Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 14:17

and at the dinner hour he sent his slave to say to those who had been invited, ‘Come; for everything is ready now.'
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Covetousness;   Feasts;   Gospel;   Jesus, the Christ;   Jesus Continued;   Kingdom of Heaven;   Opportunity;   Reproof;   Salvation;   Unbelief;   Worldliness;   Thompson Chain Reference - Absorption;   Bible Stories for Children;   Business;   Business Life;   Call, Divine;   Children;   Comes;   Divine;   God;   Home;   Invitations, Divine;   Invitations-Warnings;   Pleasant Sunday Afternoons;   Preparation;   Providence, Divine;   Religion;   Stories for Children;   The Topic Concordance - Kingdom of God;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Entertainments;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Feasts;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Food;   Grace;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Christ, Christology;   Dead Sea Scrolls;   Gospel;   Grace;   Hospitality;   Kingdom of God;   Lord's Supper, the;   Mission;   Wealth;   Work;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Exhortation;   Hospitality;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Banquet;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Banquets;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Call, Calling;   Family;   Luke, Gospel of;   Poor, Orphan, Widow;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Kingdom of God;   Matthew, Gospel According to;   Meals;   Parable;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Circumstantiality in the Parables;   Courtesy;   Discourse;   Dropsy;   Excuse;   Invitation;   Kindness (2);   Lazarus;   Luke, Gospel According to;   Marriage;   Sacraments;   Science (2);   Supper ;   Time;   Unity (2);   Wealth (2);   Worldliness (2);   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Prophet, the;   Supper;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chief parables and miracles in the bible;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Banquet;   Dinner;   Jesus Christ (Part 2 of 2);   Maimed;   Kitto Biblical Cyclopedia - Banquets;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Sent his servant - Messengers are sent to invite the guests to a Hindoo feast; when not only relations, but all persons of the same division of caste in the neighborhood, are invited. A refusal to attend is considered as a great affront.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 14:17". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-14.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Sent his servant - An invitation had been sent before, but this servant was sent at the time that the supper was ready. From this it would seem that it was the custom to announce to those invited just the time when the feast was prepared. The custom here referred to still prevails in Palestine. Dr. Thomson (“The Land and the Book,” vol. i. p. 178) says: “If a sheikh, beg, or emeer invites, he always sends a servant to call you at the proper time. This servant often repeats the very formula mentioned in Luke 14:17; Tefŭddŭlûclass="translit"> el 'asha hâderCome, for the supper is ready. The fact that this custom is mainly confined to the wealthy and to the nobility is in strict agreement with the parable, where the certain man who made the great supper and bade many is supposed to be of this class. It is true now, as then, that to refuse is a high insult to the maker of the feast, nor would such excuses as those in the parable be more acceptable to a Druse emeer than they were to the lord of this ‹great supper.‘“

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 14:17". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-14.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And he sent forth his servant at supper time to say to them that were bidden, Come; for all things are now ready.

The servant = God's messengers such as the Twelve and the Seventy

Supper time = The advent of the Messiah

Theophylact understood "the servant" to be none other than the Suffering Servant, Jesus himself; and others have supposed him to represent John the Baptist; but Trench is obviously correct. He said:

We behold in him, not the heralds who preceded, but those who accompanied the King, the evangelists and apostles ... who bade the Jews to enter on the enjoyment of those good things, no longer far off, but near.[26]

All things are now ready ... The fullness of time had come. The Messenger of the Covenant had arrived and would shortly make an atonement for sin. The first invitation (Luke 14:16) was the call of the Hebrews to be the chosen people and to receive the promises made to Abraham. This renewal of the invitation (Luke 14:17) through Christ and his apostles was the final call of Israel to the feast of the kingdom of God. Such a second invitation was customary in the East, and it would have been a serious breach of etiquette to have omitted it, a breach that Plummer described as "equivalent to canceling the more general invitation. To refuse the second invitation was an insult, equivalent among the Arab tribes to a declaration of war."[27]

[26] Ibid., p. 364.

[27] Alfred Plummer, op. cit., en loco.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 14:17". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-14.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And sent his servant at supper time,.... Either John the Baptist, the harbinger and forerunner of Christ, who declared that the kingdom of heaven, or the Gospel dispensation, was at hand; and exhorted the people to believe in Christ that should come after him; or Christ himself, who is God's servant as man, of his choosing and appointing, and whom he sent in the fulness of time in the form of a servant, as the minister of the circumcision, to the lost sheep of the house of Israel, and to call sinners to repentance; or servant may be put for servants, since in Matthew 22:3 mention is made of more; and so the Persic version here; which parable bears some likeness to this, if it is not the same; and may design the apostles of Christ, who were the servants of the most high God, and the ministers of Christ, who were first sent by him to preach the Gospel to the Jews, and to them only for a while:

to say to them that were bidden, come: this call, or invitation, was not the internal call, which is a fruit of love, and by grace, and of mighty power; to special blessings, grace, and glory; and is irresistible, effectual, and unchangeable: but external, to outward ordinances: and is often slighted and neglected; and is sometimes of persons who are neither chosen, nor sanctified, nor saved:

for all things are now ready; the Syriac version adds, "for you": righteousness, pardon of sin, peace, and reconciliation, sin put away by the sacrifice of Christ, redemption obtained, and life and salvation secured; which shows the perfection of the present dispensation, and the large provisions of the Gospel, to which nothing is, or can be brought to be added to them, or qualify for them.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:17". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-14.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

all now ready — pointing undoubtedly to the now ripening preparations for the great Gospel call. (See on Matthew 22:4.)

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 14:17". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-14.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

His servant (τον δουλον αυτουton doulon autou). His bondservant. Vocator or Summoner (Esther 5:8; Esther 6:14). This second summons was the custom then as now with wealthy Arabs. Tristram (Eastern Customs, p. 82) says: “To refuse the second summons would be an insult, which is equivalent among the Arab tribes to a declaration of war.”

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 14:17". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-14.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

The Fourfold Gospel

and he sent forth his servant at supper time to say to them that were bidden, Come; for [all] things are now ready1.

  1. And he sent forth his servant at supper time to say to them that were bidden, Come; for [all] things are now ready. The custom of sending a second invitation at the supper hour is a very old one (Esther 5:8; Esther 6:14) and is still observed.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
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J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 14:17". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-14.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

THE GREAT INVITATION

‘Come; for all things are now ready.’

Luke 14:17

There are many things that inspire one about this glorious invitation of the Gospel.

I. Its splendid note of confidence.—There is too much apologising for the Gospel in these days. The old preachers never apologised for Christianity.

II. There is something touching in the personal invitation.—God, Who made you, Who has watched over you from your very cradle, Who knows all about you, He speaks to you by name.

III. There is an intimation of the long and costly preparation.—It wanted the Son of God to come down from heaven to earth and live here; it wanted Him to take human flesh; it wanted Him to go through the agony and the bloody sweat and to die upon the Cross; it needed His going back to heaven to purchase the key and unlock, as it were, and let out the greater blessing of God. What are you waiting for—you who care nothing about the Gospel of Jesus Christ?

IV. Underneath all is the pressing note of urgency.—Whatever opportunities there may be in the other world, as far as it is revealed to us in the Bible, ‘now is the accepted time and now is the day of salvation.’

—Bishop A. F. Winnington-Ingram.

(SECOND OUTLINE)

THE SATISFACTION OF THE GOSPEL

When we hear this glorious invitation it makes us ask this question: ‘Has it been justified by results?’ There are certain things which very much tell against a confident answer. It is something which ought to oppress the soul of every good man and woman, that only eighteen out of every hundred in the great city of London go either to church or chapel. Now, that of itself is something which certainly prevents one from giving a confident answer; but those who can look back over a long experience among the dying, the sick, and the troubled, are able to say that they know that there has been satisfaction found in the Gospel of Jesus Christ for the mind and for the conscience and for the heart and for the spirit of mankind. The Gospel satisfies—

I. The mind.—Take the mind first. Do you mean to say you never thought at all why the world was made? Do you never think on a starry night, Who made these blazing suns? And what is the answer? Does any one know? Does any philosopher know? Does any astronomer know? You ask, and they will tell you they know nothing at all of Who made the stars. They can trace the stars in their courses; they can tell you how things gradually came about. But what is the centre of everything? All the old philosophers asked the question: Was there a Person in the centre of the Universe at all? And, as thinking men and women, every day it is a source of intellectual satisfaction to us that we have been told what is at the centre of the world. There is not an insensate force, but a Person, Who has made the world. Herschel said there is a mark of mind on every created atom. And is not there a mark of mind upon the universe? It is just as impossible for the atoms of the universe to throw themselves into shape as for a box of letters to throw themselves into a play of Shakespeare. I find satisfaction for my mind in this. It is the good news. I can tell what is the Centre of the universe, and I thank God on my knees that I know there is a God, a Living Person.

II. The conscience.—Then, is there no satisfaction for the conscience? The character of Jesus Christ not only satisfies the conscience, but educates it at the same time. In other words, in the character of Christ there is something far more perfect than we could have thought possible if we had sat down to think by ourselves. I say that the life of Christ has satisfied the conscience.

III. The heart.—What about the heart? In the Gospel there is satisfaction for the heart (see Illustration).

IV. The Spirit.—And what about the spirit? I speak to living spirits—you are spirits. I ask the man who has prayed for years and has been to the Holy Communion, whether he has not come back with what the Prayer Book calls a heart strengthened and refreshed by the Body and Blood of Christ; and whether in answer to his prayers he has not received the peace of God which passeth all understanding?

Then, if the mind and the conscience and the heart and the spirit are satisfied with the Gospel of Jesus Christ, are we not right when, at the end of two thousand years, we as Christian ministers stand before you, and with the same old confidence say, ‘Come; for all things are now ready’? This is a true satisfaction for the needs of men. Why are you not coming to the satisfaction of your souls?

—Bishop A. F. Winnington-Ingram.

Illustration

‘The Bishop of London has mentioned a story which illustrates the satisfaction there is in the Gospel for the heart. He was standing one day in his room in Bethnal Green, where he was rector, and he was called away to a particularly sad scene in a working man’s home. There were three children—all ill, and while they were in that room altogether the three children died, one after the other, in an hour. What had the Christian minister to say to the father? What could the clever sceptic say to him? Nothing at all; the sceptic would have had no comfort for that poor man. But, thank God, the Christian minister could tell him of the Good Shepherd Who had taken up the lambs into His bosom and taken them safely to be with Him for ever. That man had comfort in that he believed the message. In the Gospel there was satisfaction for his heart.’

(THIRD OUTLINE)

WHY MEN HESITATE

Let us consider why men hesitate to accept this glorious invitation, ‘Come; for all things are now ready.’

I. In doubt.—‘I am so much in doubt,’ says one. ‘My mind is overclouded by doubts, and that is why I do not come.’ Do you remember what Thomas did when in doubt? Did he leave the Church? Did he go away altogether from the things of God? He stayed with the Church, he stayed with the others, praying for light, and therefore he received a revelation of Christ. If you will stay with the Church, and get some help for doubts and difficulties, you too will receive the revelation from Christ Himself.

II. A wrong conscience.—But you say, ‘It is all very well to preach to me; my conscience is wrong.’ Yes; when are you going to get that conscience so that you have the answer of a good conscience before God? Get your conscience right. God is right enough; there is love enough and grace enough; and, therefore, get the conscience right. Then the conscience will see its ideal in Jesus Christ.

III. The heart is wrong.—You say the heart is wrong. ‘I love the world, I love pleasures, I love enjoyment, I have no taste for these heavenly things.’ But you must have some taste if you are to enjoy the life of heaven. When you are wondering what your future is to be, remember you make your future yourself. We carry heaven and hell with us. Take a man to-day whose whole joy is lust of the flesh and sensual pleasure. Put him in heaven. He would hate it; and therefore we have to train our liking, our hearts and characters here, that we may love the pure joys of heaven when we have them.

Come, then; that is the ending as it was the beginning. ‘Come; for all things are now ready’; make a resolution that with clear minds, with true consciences, with liberated hearts and loving spirits you will make another trial of the Gospel of Jesus Christ; and you will have this satisfaction, that not only will you live stronger, happier, brighter lives on earth, but you shall sit down at the marriage supper of the Lamb.

Bishop A. F. Winnington-Ingram.

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Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Luke 14:17". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/luke-14.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

17 And sent his servant at supper time to say to them that were bidden, Come; for all things are now ready.

Ver. 17. See Matthew 22:3.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:17". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-14.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Luke 14:17

Reasons for Embracing the Gospel.

I. You believe that the Gospel is true; perhaps upon no one point are your convictions so full and clear and decided. It matters not whence this conviction has been derived; we have the fact, and here we take our stand and make our appeal. Why not embrace it? "Come; for all things are now ready."

II. While you admit the Gospel record to be true, you at the same time approve of the entire subject-matter of its testimony. The human mind, unclouded by prejudice and unperverted by sophistry, is always in favour of the Gospel. If the Gospel is not only true, but if in all its principles and claims it is precisely what you feel it ought to be; nay, if you mean—certainly expect, sooner or later—to come upon the ground where it would put you, and be what it requires you to be,—why, we ask, in view of all that is intelligible in your convictions of the truth and reasonableness, why not embrace it?

III. Conscience, enlightened by the truth, requires you to embrace the Gospel, reproves you for not doing it, and heralds a painful retribution for refusing or neglecting to do it. Conscience may be stupid sometimes and not speak; but its voice, whenever heard, is clearly, decidedly, uniformly in favour of practical spiritual religion.

IV. You feel that the Gospel of Jesus Christ is the very thing for need; that is, as you look at it carefully, study it in its different aspects, and examine closely its provisions, it is precisely adapted to all those wants which, as unsatisfied, are the causes of your disquietude and pain. You see and feel that it is the very hope your troubled spirit needs. You have no doubt that it is a good hope, a well-founded hope; why not embrace it and let your emancipated spirit go free?

E. Mason, A Pastor's Legacy, p. 58.


Reference: Luke 14:17.—Spurgeon, Sermons, vol. xxiii., No. 1354.

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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Luke 14:17". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/luke-14.html.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

17.] The δοῦλος is one spirit, one message; but not necessarily, in the three cases, one and the same person. The three messages were delivered (1) by John the Baptist and our Lord; (2) by our Lord and the Apostles; (3) by the Apostles and those who came after. The elder prophets cannot be meant, for ἕτοιμά ἐστιν πάντα was the message, = ἤγγικεν ἡ βασ. τ. οὐρ.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 14:17". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-14.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 14:17. εἰπεῖν, to say) The successive steps of the gradation are to be observed: Luke 14:17, εἰπεῖν, to say, κεκλημένοις, to the called: Luke 14:21, εἰσάγαγε, bring in, τοὺς πτωχοῦς, the poor: Luke 14:23, ἀνάγκασον, compel, εἰς τὰς ὁδοὺς, i.e. those who are in the highways, etc. The call goes forward to those that are at a greater distance, and by its continually increasing urgency it compensates for the delay previously incurred. [The called are of Israel.—V. g.— ἤδη) already now. Herein the time of the New Testament is shown to be the present time.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 14:17". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-14.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Poole on "Luke 14:16"

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 14:17". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-14.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

званым На свадьбу, которая могла длиться целую неделю, гостей приглашали заранее и давали общее представление о времени ее начала. Когда все многочисленные приготовления, наконец, заканчивались, заранее приглашенных гостей извещали, когда она начнется. Заранее приглашенные гости – это указание на израильский народ, которому через Ветхий Завет было сказано подготовиться к приходу Мессии.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 14:17". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-14.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

To them that were bidden; to them that were regularly invited. These represent here the Jews, to whom the gospel was first offered, especially the scribes and Pharisees.

Come, for all things are now ready; the invitation to those who hear the gospel to partake of its blessings. Jesus Christ has provided, and freely offers, the richest and most abundant blessings. All excuses which men make for not accepting them are vain and wicked.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 14:17". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-14.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

17.Sent his servant at supper time—According to the custom of the East, that after the first invitation a messenger is additionally sent to give notice of the supper time.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 14:17". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-14.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 14:17. Sent his servant. This was usual in the East (comp. Matthew 22:3). As but one servant is spoken of, and but one such invitation, we must understand this as representing Christ Himself, who came to those invited, saying: come, for things are now ready, i.e., ‘the kingdom of heaven is at hand’ (Matthew 4:17). See further on Matthew 22:4. The immediate invitation is based on the fact, that preparation had been made. ‘All’ is to be omitted, but is a correct explanation of the full sense. The gospel, telling of the facts of salvation, repeats this announcement; it is always a message sent through Christ (‘His servant’).

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 14:17". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-14.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 14:17. : a second invitation according to Eastern custom still prevailing (Rosenmüller, Morgenland, ver.192; Thomson, Land and Book, vol. i. chap. ix.).

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 14:17". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-14.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

servant = bondman.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 14:17". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-14.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And sent his servant at supper time to say to them that were bidden, Come; for all things are now ready.

And sent his servant at supper time to say to them that were bidden, Come; for all things are now ready - pointing undoubtedly to the lengthened, but now ripening preparations for the great Gospel call. See the note at Matthew 22:4.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 14:17". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-14.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(17) And sent his servant.—The servant stands in this parable as the representative of the whole order of prophets and apostles—of all who, like the Baptist and the Twelve, had been sent to invite men to the Kingdom. “The time of supper” is, in the primary application, the time of our Lord’s coming, when the Kingdom of Heaven was first proclaimed as nigh at hand. All things—pardon, peace, blessedness—were now ready for those who would accept them.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 14:17". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-14.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And sent his servant at supper time to say to them that were bidden, Come; for all things are now ready.
his
3:4-6; 9:1-5; 10:1-12; Proverbs 9:1-5; Matthew 3:1-12; 10:1-4; Acts 2:38,39; Acts 3:24-26; 13:26,38,39
Come
Matthew 11:27-29; 22:3,4; John 7:37; 2 Corinthians 5:18-21; 6:1
Reciprocal: Proverbs 9:2 - mingled;  Proverbs 9:3 - sent;  Zephaniah 1:7 - he hath;  Matthew 23:37 - and ye

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 14:17". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-14.html.