Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 14:27

Whoever does not carry his own cross and come after Me cannot be My disciple.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Cross;   Discipleship;   Jesus, the Christ;   Salvation;   Seekers;   Self-Denial;   Stoicism;   Thompson Chain Reference - Discipleship;   Followers;   Self-Denial;   Self-Indulgence-Self-Denial;   The Topic Concordance - Disciples/apostles;   Hate;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Missionaries, All Christians Should Be as;   Pilgrims and Strangers;   Self-Denial;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Cross;   Disciple;   Hatred;   Teacher;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Death of Christ;   Disciple, Discipleship;   Jesus Christ;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Hospitality;   CARM Theological Dictionary - Disciple;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Ruth;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Cross, Crucifixion;   Disciples;   Family;   Luke, Gospel of;   Violence;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Cross;   Ethics;   Matthew, Gospel According to;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Ambassage;   Announcements of Death;   Christianity;   Consciousness;   Cross, Cross-Bearing;   Disciple (2);   Discipleship;   Discourse;   Example;   Fellowship (2);   Forsaking All;   Ideas (Leading);   Marks Stigmata;   Organization (2);   Paradox;   Power;   Premeditation;   Prudence;   Selfishness;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Disciple,;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Christ, Offices of;   Jesus Christ (Part 2 of 2);   Self-Surrender;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for September 7;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Doth not bear his cross - See on Matthew 10:38; (note); Matthew 16:24; (note).

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 14:27". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-14.html. 1832.

The Biblical Illustrator

Luke 14:27

And whosoever doth not bear his cross, etc

On taking up the cross

Christiani sunt cruciani, says Luther, Christians are cross-bearers.
It is in their hearts to bear the cross, whatever it be, whensoever Christ shall require it; and they do actually bear it whenever they are called to it. They do not flinch from it, nor decline it, nor turn from it, by any indirect or unlawful course.

I. WHAT IS MEANT BY THE CROSS.

1. The cross includes loss and damage, the greatest losses as well as the least; the loss of all outward things, as well as the loss of any. When Christ was nailed to the cross, He was bereaved of all, and fastened to it naked; He had not so much as His garments left; they who brought Him to the cross divided these amongst them. He that is not willing to part with all, to follow Christ, when he cannot fully and faithfully follow Him without quitting all, he is not worthy of Him, unworthy the name of a Christian.

2. It speaks shame and reproach. It was serviie supplicium, a base ignominious suffering, to which none were exposed but the vilest of men. It was a suffering proper to slaves and fugitives; there was not the meanest freeman amongst the Romans but was above it. Hence shame and the cross are joined together (Hebrews 12:2). Hence that expression, “bearing His reproach” (Hebrews 13:13), i.e., bearing the cross. No coming to Christ but in this posture, when the Lord calls to it.

3. It imports pain and torture. The cross was a most grievous and painful suffering. Ausonius calls it paenae extremum, the extremity of torture. And Cicero, crudelissimum teterrimumque supplicium, the most cruel and horrid suffering. When Ignatius was going to be exposed to the fury of wild beasts for the name of Christ, he cries, “Now I begin to be a disciple.”

4. It imports death itself. The cross was ultimum supplicium, the last thing that could be suffered. Cruelty was herein terminated, and could go no further, at least to the sense of the sufferer. It was the worst kind of death.

II. WHAT IT IS TO BEAR THE CROSS.

1. You must make account of it. Calculate what it will cost you.

2. A resolution to bear the cross, whatever it be, how heavy, or grievous, or tedious soever it may prove; a firm, and hearty, and settled resolution to bear it, is a virtual bearing of it beforehand (verse 33).

3. You must be always ready for the cross, always preparing for it, whether it seem near, or whether it seem further off. One paraphraseth the words thus, “Whosoever doth not come to Me with a preparation of mind to suffer anything rather than part with Me, he is not for My turn.” This is to bear the cross daily, as Christ requires (Luke 9:1-62.). Though every day do not afford a cross, yet every day we bear the cross by daily preparing for it 1 Corinthians 15:31). Even when the cross seems far off, much more when it is in view, you must be preparing for it, if you be Christians indeed; and the Lord will take your readiness to bear it for a bearing of it, when He sees good to prevent it.

4. It speaks actual undergoing it when it is laid on us. But when the Lord brings it to us, we must actually take it up. He is no disciple for Christ that will not do it.

III. THE MANNER OF BEARING THE CROSS.

1. A Christian endeavours to bear the cross patiently. That while the cross oppresses his outward man, he may possess his soul in patience. Not the patience of the Stoics, a senseless stupidness; nor the patience of the heathen, a mere yielding to necessity; but a due sense of the pressure, with a quiet submission to the hand of God, whoever be the instrument, without murmuring, repining, disquietment, or despondency.

2. He endeavours to bear it cheerfully. That which is bearing the cross here is taking up the cross (chap. 9.). Christ bore His cross willingly; Simon of Cyrene was compelled to bear that cross. Christ would have us come after Him, bear it as He did. It should not be a forced, but a voluntary act.

3. He endeavours to bear it fruitfully. The cross is dry wood, and so was Aaron’s rod; but as that blossomed, so does this bring forth fruit, when improved (Hebrews 12:11). This puts the followers of Christ upon seeking the sweet fruits of peace and holiness in the bowels of devouring calamities; to get spiritual gain and advantage by outward loss; to grow richer unto God by worldly impoverishment; to converse more with God when separated from friends and relations; to value more the love of Christ when they smart by the world’s hatred; to partake more of holiness when he partakes less of the ease, peace, plenty of the world; to make use of the cross for the crucifying of the flesh; to make sin more hateful and dreadful, the conscience more tender, the world less tempting, more contemptible, grace more active and lively, the word more sweet and effectual, prayer more fervent and affectionate, the appearing of Christ more lovely and desirable, the conversation more heavenly. To hear the cross as a disciple of Christ, is to bring forth more fruit in bearing of it. (D. Clarkson, B. D.)

The Christian’s cross

I. THE CROSS IS ORDINARILY THE LOT OF CHRISTIANS. Persecution and troubles have always attended the people of God. And the reasons of it are evident.

1. The malice of Satan, who knowing himself to be cast off by God, he hates God with an implacable hatred; and since the Lord is above the reach of his malice, he falls upon those who are dearest to Him, the people of God.

2. The enmity of the world. The world would be sure to cross, to afflict and persecute what it hates; and the disciples of Christ are hated by the John 15:19). Not only that part of the world which evidently lies in wickedness, but the more refined part of it which dresseth up itself in a form of godliness. Those who have no more but the form, hate those that haw the power, because this is a real reproof and conviction of the vanity and insufficiency of outward forms, how specious soever; and that which detects them is hated by them (1 John 5:19).

3. There is a necessity of the cross upon a manifold account.

II. A CHRISTIAN CANNOT ORDINARILY AVOID THE CROSS WITHOUT SINNING AGAINST CHRIST.

III. HE THAT WILL ORDINARILY SIN AGAINST CHRIST TO AVOID THE CROSS, CANNOT BE A CHRISTIAN. This being proved, it will appear an evident truth, that he that doth not, will not, bear the cross, is not, cannot be a Christian. (D. Clarkson, B. D.)

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Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Luke 14:27". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/luke-14.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

Whosoever doth not bear his own cross, and come after me, cannot be my disciple.

Long familiarity has softened the meaning of this for modern disciples, the usual notion of it being that the reference here is to a patient, submissive acceptance of the ills and misfortunes of life; but Jesus plainly meant that to be his disciple one would have to hate his own life to the extent of willingness to accept crucifixion at the hands of the Romans for the sake of fidelity to Christ. The background against which Jesus spoke these words proves this to be true. Only twenty-four years previously, about A.D. 6, "The Romans crucified hundreds of followers of the rebel, Judas the Gaulonite ... Crucifixion was a common spectacle both before and after that date."[37] Therefore, Jesus' mention of bearing a "cross" could not have failed, in the audience which heard him, to mean the most horrible of deaths.

ENDNOTE:

[37] Ibid., p. 400.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 14:27". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-14.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Whosoever doth not bear his cross,.... All reproach, afflictions, persecutions, and death itself, cheerfully and patiently; the Ethiopic version renders it, "of his death the cross"; it signifies whatever is trying and disagreeable to flesh and blood:

and come after me; bearing his cross; as Christ himself was about to do, and which doubtless he had in view;

cannot be my disciple; he is not so in reality, nor does he deserve the name.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:27". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-14.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

6 And whosoever doth not bear his cross, and come after me, cannot be my disciple.

(6) The true followers of Christ must at once build and fight, and therefore be ready and prepared to endure all types of miseries.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Luke 14:27". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/luke-14.html. 1599-1645.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

His own cross (τον σταυρον εαυτοton stauron heautoū). This familiar figure we have had already (Luke 9:23; Mark 8:34; Matthew 10:38; Matthew 16:24). Each follower has a cross which he must bear as Jesus did his. ασταζωBastazō is used of cross bearing in the N.T. only here (figuratively) and John 19:17 literally of Jesus. Crucifixion was common enough in Palestine since the days of Antiochus Epiphanes and Alexander Jannaeus.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 14:27". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-14.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

His cross

More correctly, his own. An important charge. All must bear the cross, but not all the same cross: each one his own.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 14:27". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-14.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

The Fourfold Gospel

Whosoever doth not bear his own cross, and come after me, cannot be my disciple1.

  1. Whosoever doth not bear his own cross, and come after me, cannot be my disciple. Christ must be followed and imitated even to the extremity of suffering. The costliness of discipleship is illustrated in the two brief parables which follow.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 14:27". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-14.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

27 And whosoever doth not bear his cross, and come after me, cannot be my disciple.

Ver. 27. See Matthew 10:38; Matthew 16:24.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:27". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-14.html. 1865-1868.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 14:27. Comp. Matthew 10:38; Matthew 16:24; Mark 8:34; Mark 10:21; Luke 9:23. He who does not as the bearer of his own cross follow me, etc.

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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Luke 14:27". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/luke-14.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 14:27. καὶ) “whosoever doth not bear his cross,” and yet (not, and does not come) comes, and walks after me, as ye do, as though he was wishing to be my disciple. [But Engl. Ver. takes it in the way which Beng. rejects, “Whosoever doth not bear his cross and come after me,” etc.] Comp. note, Matthew 16:24.(149)

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 14:27". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-14.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Poole on "Luke 14:25"

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 14:27". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-14.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

не несет креста Т.е. добровольно. Эти слова перекликаются с требованием возненавидеть свою собственную жизнь в ст. 26. См. пояснения к 9:23; Мф. 10:38; ср. Мк. 8:34.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 14:27". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-14.html.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

“Whoever does not bear his own cross, and come after me, cannot be my disciple.”

The second cost is with regard to manner of life. The idea here has already been dealt with in Luke 10:23-27. A man who would follow Jesus must be like a man who bears his cross on the way to execution. He leaves his past behind never to be enjoyed again. He follows Jesus wherever it may lead, even in the pathway of suffering and, if necessary, death. He renounces all his past life. He dies to himself. He is totally committed to Jesus no matter what lies ahead. All those present of mature age would have seen what happened to men who took up their crosses, and many were seen as having been patriots. They had chosen the way of the cross once they had become insurgents, whether they eventually ended up there or not. Jesus’ disciples must be willing to take it too.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 14:27". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-14.html. 2013.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

27.Bear his cross—See note on Matthew 10:38.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 14:27". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-14.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 14:27. See on Matthew 10:38; Matthew 16:24; Mark 8:34; Luke 9:23. While our Lord had foretold His death, He had not announced that He would be crucified; so that this saying must have sounded strangely to the multitude. Notice that both verses speak of being a disciple, not simply becoming one. The permanent requirement of discipleship is stated.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 14:27". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-14.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 14:27 = Matthew 10:38, with the idea of ability substituted for the idea of worth.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 14:27". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-14.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

his = his own.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 14:27". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-14.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(27) Whosoever doth not bear his cross . . .—See Note on Matthew 10:38. As now uttered, however, the words had a fresh significance as interpreted by what the disciples had heard from their Master’s lips between Peter’s confession and the Transfiguration (Luke 9:22-23). That “bearing of the cross” was becoming every day more clear and terrible in its growing nearness.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 14:27". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-14.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And whosoever doth not bear his cross, and come after me, cannot be my disciple.
doth
9:23-25; Matthew 10:38; 16:24-26; Mark 8:34-37; 10:21; 15:21; John 19:17; 2 Timothy 3:12
cannot
Matthew 13:21; Acts 14:22; 2 Timothy 1:12
Reciprocal: Exodus 13:17 - the people repent;  Deuteronomy 21:13 - and bewail;  Matthew 18:8 - if;  Luke 23:26 - that;  Acts 15:38 - who;  2 Timothy 4:10 - having;  1 Peter 2:21 - even;  Revelation 2:3 - hast borne;  Revelation 3:15 - thou

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 14:27". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-14.html.