Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 14:26

"If anyone comes to Me, and does not hate his own father and mother and wife and children and brothers and sisters, yes, and even his own life, he cannot be My disciple.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Affections;   Discipleship;   Jesus, the Christ;   Life;   Marriage;   Salvation;   Seekers;   Self-Denial;   Stoicism;   Scofield Reference Index - Hate;   Thompson Chain Reference - Discipleship;   Self-Denial;   Self-Indulgence-Self-Denial;   The Topic Concordance - Disciples/apostles;   Hate;   Love;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Affections, the;   Husbands;   Life, Natural;   Missionaries, All Christians Should Be as;   Pilgrims and Strangers;   Proselytes;   Self-Denial;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Hate;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Disciple;   Hatred;   Teacher;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Disciple, Discipleship;   Hate, Hatred;   Jesus Christ;   Love;   Soul;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Hospitality;   Judgment, Last;   CARM Theological Dictionary - Disciple;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Hatred;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Elisha;   Levi;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Disciples;   Family;   Hate, Hatred;   Luke, Gospel of;   Violence;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Ethics;   God;   Hatred;   Matthew, Gospel According to;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Ambassage;   Ambition;   Asceticism (2);   Attributes of Christ;   Celibacy (2);   Children;   Claim;   Coming to Christ;   Common Life;   Communion (2);   Consciousness;   Death (2);   Disciple (2);   Discipleship;   Discourse;   Divinity of Christ;   Enthusiasm;   Example;   Family (Jesus);   Fellowship (2);   Following;   Forsaking All;   Hating, Hatred;   Hatred;   Ideas (Leading);   Life ;   Love (2);   Marriage (Ii.);   Mercy;   Metaphors;   Mother (2);   Paradox;   Parents (2);   Poet;   Power;   Prudence;   Self- Denial;   Self-Denial;   Selfishness;   Sisters;   Soul;   Trinity (2);   Turning;   Wealth (2);   Womanliness;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Disciple,;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Hate;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Abstinence;   Hate;   Jesus Christ (Part 2 of 2);   Life;   Love;   Self-Surrender;   Sister;  
Devotionals:
Chip Shots from the Ruff of Life - Devotion for September 22;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

And hate not - Matthew, Matthew 10:37, expresses the true meaning of this word, when he says, He who loveth his father and mother More than me. In Matthew 6:24, he uses the word hate in the same sense. When we read, Romans 9:13, Jacob have I loved, but Esau have I hated, the meaning is simply, I have loved Jacob - the Israelites, more than Esau - the Edomites; and that this is no arbitrary interpretation of the word hate, but one agreeable to the Hebrew idiom, appears from what is said on Genesis 29:30, Genesis 29:31, where Leah's being hated is explained by Rachel's being loved more than Leah. See also Deuteronomy 21:15-17; and Bishop Pearce on this place. See also the notes on Matthew 10:37; (note).

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 14:26". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-14.html. 1832.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

If any man come to me,.... Not in a corporeal, but in a spiritual way; nor barely to hear him preach; but so come, as that he believes in him, applies to him for grace, pardon, righteousness, life, and salvation; professes to be his, submits to his ordinances, and desires to be a disciple of his;

and hate not his father and mother, and wife and children, and brethren and sisters, yea, and his own life also, he cannot be my disciple: not that proper hatred of any, or all of these, is enjoined by Christ; for this would be contrary to the laws of God, to the first principles of nature, to all humanity, to the light of nature, to reason and divine revelation: but that these are not to be preferred to Christ, or loved more than he, as it is explained in Matthew 10:37 yea, these are to be neglected and forsaken, and turned from with indignation and resentment, when they stand in the way of the honour and interest of Christ, and dissuade from his service: such who would be accounted the disciples of Christ, should be ready to part with their dearest relations and friends, with the greatest enjoyment of life, and with life itself, when Christ calls for it; or otherwise they are not worthy to be called his disciples. The Ethiopic version inserts, "his house", into the account.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:26". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-14.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

If any [man] come to me, and d hate not his father, and mother, and wife, and children, and brethren, and sisters, yea, and his own life also, he cannot be my disciple.

(d) If anything stands between God and him, as Theophylact says: and therefore these words are spoken in a comparative way, and not by themselves.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Luke 14:26". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/luke-14.html. 1599-1645.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Hateth not (ου μισειou misei). An old and very strong verb μισεωmiseō to hate, detest. The orientals use strong language where cooler spirits would speak of preference or indifference. But even so Jesus does not here mean that one must hate his father or mother of necessity or as such, for Matthew 15:4 proves the opposite. It is only where the element of choice comes in (cf. Matthew 6:24) as it sometimes does, when father or mother opposes Christ. Then one must not hesitate. The language here is more sharply put than in Matthew 10:37. The ουou here coalesces with the verb μισειmisei in this conditional clause of the first class determined as fulfilled. It is the language of exaggerated contrast, it is true, but it must not be watered down till the point is gone. In mentioning “and wife” Jesus has really made a comment on the excuse given in Luke 14:20 (I married a wife and so I am not able to come).

And his own life also (ετι τε και την πσυχην εαυτουeti te kai tēn psuchēn heautou). Note τε καιte kai both - and. “The τεte (B L) binds all the particulars into one bundle of renuncianda ” (Bruce). Note this same triple group of conjunctions (ετι τε καιeti te kai) in Acts 21:28, “And moreover also,” “even going as far as his own life.” Martyrdom should be an ever-present possibility to the Christian, not to be courted, but not to be shunned. Love for Christ takes precedence “over even the elemental instinct of self-preservation” (Ragg).

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 14:26". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-14.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

If any man come to me, and hate not his father, and mother, and wife, and children, and brethren, and sisters, yea, and his own life also, he cannot be my disciple.

If any man come to me, and hate not his father — Comparatively to Christ: yea, so as actually to renounce his field, oxen, wife, all things, and act as if he hated them, when they stand in competition with him. Matthew 10:37.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:26". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-14.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

If any man cometh unto me, and hateth not his own father, and mother, and wife, and children, and brethren, and sisters1, yea, and his own life also, he cannot be my disciple2.

  1. If any man cometh unto me, and hateth not his own father, and mother, and wife, and children, and brethren, and sisters. "Hateth", as used here, is an example of phenomenal speech, or speaking from appearances. In the cases supposed, the person would "appear" to hate those whom he abandoned for Christ. It is like repent, anger, etc., when spoken of God. To construe the passage literally as enjoining hatred would be contrary to the fifth commandment as re-enacted at Ephesians 6:1-3; Colossians 3:20 and also contrary to our Lord's own example (John 19:25-27). Seeing the number of those adherents which now surrounded him, Jesus made use of this striking statement that he might startle each hearer, and impress upon him the wide difference between a mere outward appearance upon him and a real, disciple-like adhesion to him.

  2. Yea, and his own life also, he cannot be my disciple. The latter requires that we be ready to sacrifice all, even our animal life, in so far as it tends to separate from Christ (Acts 20:24; Romans 12:11).

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 14:26". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-14.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Hate not his father, &c.; be not willing to give up his dearest earthly friends.

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Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Luke 14:26". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/luke-14.html. 1878.

Scofield's Reference Notes

hate

All terms which define the emotions or affections are comparative. Natural affection is to be, as compared with the believer's devotedness to Christ, as if it were hate. See Matthew 12:47-50 where Christ illustrates this principle in His own person. But in the Lord the natural affections are sanctified and lifted to the level of the divine love (cf); John 19:26; John 19:27; Ephesians 5:25-28.

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These files are considered public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available in the Online Bible Software Library.
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Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Luke 14:26". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/luke-14.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

26 If any man come to me, and hate not his father, and mother, and wife, and children, and brethren, and sisters, yea, and his own life also, he cannot be my disciple.

Ver. 26. And hate not his father, &c.] {a} Much more his farm and his oxen. It was not these, but the inordinate love of these, that detained them, as Christ here intimateth. Your house, home, and goods, yea, life, and all that ever ye have (saith that martyr), God hath given you as love tokens, to admonish you of his love, to win your love to him again. Now will he try your love, whether ye set more by him or by his tokens.

{a} μισει, ex מאס ex odio reprobavit, respuit.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:26". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-14.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Luke 14:26. And hate not his father, &c.— Strictly speaking, to hate our nearest relations, and our own lives, would be unnatural wickedness, and equally contrary to the dictates of humanity, and the genius of the gospel. But it is well known, that one thing is said to be loved and another hated in scripture, when the former is much preferred; and especially when out of regard to it, the latter is neglected or forsaken. Compare Genesis 29:31. Deuteronomy 21:15-17. Malachi 1:3. Romans 9:13. Matthew 6:24. Father and mother, and other relations were particularly mentioned by our Lord, because, as affairs then stood, the profession of the gospel was apt to set a man at variance with his nearest relations.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Luke 14:26". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/luke-14.html. 1801-1803.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 14:26. [ εἴ τις, if any man) Wherever the greatest multitude of men flocked together, there at times Jesus used especial sternness of language.—V. g.]— οὐ μισεῖ τὸν πατέρα αὐτοῦ, doth not hate his father) viz. hate his father, etc., in that respect, in which he is bound to hate himself ( τὴν εἁυτοῦ ψυχήν), namely, whereinsoever father, etc., or self are inconsistent with love to Christ [are averse from Christ]. This text applies to that time especially, in which few were really following Christ: many hated, who deserved to be hated themselves. This hatred must be understood not merely in the comparative [hate, i.e. love less] or conditional and qualified sense, but even absolutely: For whoever hath derived from Christ a ripened knowledge, taste, and appetite for God and heavenly good things (Luke 14:16, the viands of the “great supper”), has also a contempt and hatred of self and of the whole creature that [of the whole creation, so far as it] is subject to vanity, a hatred that is at once high-spirited and yet at the same time removed from all bitterness of feeling. Comp. note, John 12:25.— ἀδελφοὺς, brethren) Comp. Luke 14:12.— ἔτι δὲ, yea besides his own life) What is dearest to man, himself. Often he who has seemed to attain to a lower degree of this holy hatred, proves wanting in a higher degree of it.— τὴν εἁυτοῦ ψυχὴν, his own soul or life) i.e. himself.— μαθητὴς εἶναι, my disciple he cannot be) The order is reversed in the following verse, εἶναι μαθητὴς, be my disciple. In both passages the accent in pronunciation falls upon the word which stands first.(148)

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 14:26". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-14.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Poole on "Luke 14:25"

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 14:26". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-14.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

не возненавидит Подобное утверждение в Мф. 10:37 является ключом к пониманию этого трудного повеления. Требующаяся здесь «ненависть» – это, на самом деле, меньшая любовь. Иисус призывал Своих учеников взращивать такую преданность Ему, в сравнении с которой их привязанность к чему-то еще, включая их собственную жизнь, будет казаться ненавистью. См. 16:13 и Быт. 29:30, 31 для понимания подобного употребления слова «ненавидеть».

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 14:26". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-14.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Hate not; if he be not willing for my sake to leave father and mother. Matthew 10:37.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 14:26". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-14.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

“If any man comes to me, and does not love less than me, his own father, and mother, and wife, and children, and brethren, and sisters, yes, and his own life also, he cannot be my disciple.”

The first cost was with regard to family. As He had demonstrated earlier, now that He was fulfilling His ministry His own family, who had actually sought to interfere with that ministry, even though He loved them, counted as less to Him than His new spiritual family, which consisted of those who heard the word of God that He spoke, and did it (Luke 8:19-21; Mark 3:31-35).

In the same way those who ‘come to Him’ in order to follow Him must recognise that He must then mean more to them than their families. They must respond to His way of life and His words. They must love their families less than they love Him. This very claim reveals that Jesus saw Himself as more than simply a man, that He saw Himself as having the right to claim a man’s total submission.

The word used here is regularly translated in modern versions as ‘hate’ and that is what it does often mean. But we must beware. No word in one language translates exactly into another. Thus miseo does not always mean ‘hate. It can mean ‘love with a lesser love’. Consider the following examples:

· In Genesis 29:30-31 LXX we read of Jacob that ‘he loved Rachel more than Leah’, and it goes on to say ‘and when the Lord saw that Leah was ‘hated’, (that is ‘not loved like Rachel was’). Thus the comparison is between two levels of love.

· In Deuteronomy 21:15-17 a man has two wives, one of whom he loves more than the other. The point is not that he hates the second wife, but that he does not love her like he does the other.

· In 2. Samuel Luke 19:6 the charge is made that David loves those who loved him less than he loved Absalom. It could hardly be thought that he was seen as hating them. The charge is that he does not love them as he ought.

· In Proverbs 13:24 we are told that ‘he who spares the rod hates his son.’ Taken literally that would be nonsense. If he hated him he would not spare the rod. The point being made is that a loving father should punish the son whom he loves, because he loves him and wants him to grow up rightly. If he does not he is demonstrating that he has a lesser love.

· In Romans 9:13 we read, ‘Jacob I loved and Esau I hated’ because the latter would serve the former. Again the idea is not that the Lord hated Esau. Rather it is that His love for Jacob was the stronger because He had chosen him, while he had put Esau in second place. He had a lesser love for him, although it was still great enough to bless him (Genesis 27:39-40).

In the same way it is quite clear that ‘hate’ is not what is meant here. Even if there were no other argument to prove that it becomes clear from the fact that Jesus includes the man as ‘hating’ Himself. But if the word is taken literally no normal, rational man would ever really do such a thing, however much he may hate his own selfishness, and the sin that sometimes possesses him. He simply loves himself less. And this meaning is confirmed in that Jesus has already told His hearers to love their enemies and not only those who love them (Luke 6:27; Luke 6:32; Luke 6:35).

So the Old Testament LXX background indicates quite clearly that ‘hate’ is not always the correct translation for miseo. When it speaks of God loving Jacob and ‘hating’ Esau this simply means that He has set His love on Jacob and not on Esau, because Jacob is His chosen one, His beloved. Esau is not loved in the same way, and is ‘loved less’. In the same way for people to ‘love Jesus’ is to set their love on Him and choose to follow Him. By it they have made Him their chosen Master. To ‘hate’ their families indicates that they leave them, however reluctantly, in order to follow Jesus, and that they will not allow their lesser commitment to their families interfere with their greater commitment to Jesus. Given the choice they, however grievingly, turn their backs on their families (compare Luke 9:59-62). If they are faced with a choice between obedience to Jesus and obedience to their families, they will choose obedience to Jesus. For they ‘love’ Him, and their families they ‘love less’. And the point here is that this is what following Jesus calls for.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 14:26". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-14.html. 2013.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

26.If any man come to me—With a true and earnest coming; not an excited chasing of my footsteps.

Hate not—With a moral and holy repulsion.

Father—The relatives, the ties, the interests that stand in the way of his entire surrender to me.

His own life—When to love it would make him an apostate and cheat him of the martyr’s crown.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 14:26". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-14.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 14:26. See on Matthew 10:37. Which was addressed to the Twelve.

Hate not. The demand is for supreme love to Christ: father, and mother, etc., are placed here as objects which may and often do interfere with this supreme love. In so far as they do this, they are to be hated, not actively and personally, but generally. The meaning will best appear, if we notice the crowning thought: yea, and his own life also. This cannot, of course, mean that a man should actively hate his life or soul, for then he must kill himself to become a Christian. All belonging solely to the sphere of the lower life, as opposed to the life of the Spirit, must be opposed in heart, i.e., actually hated. The power to love implies the power to hate. Alford: ‘This hate is not only consistent with, but absolutely necessary to the very highest kind of love. It is that element in love which makes a man a wise and Christian friend,—not for time only but for eternity.’

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 14:26". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-14.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 14:26. , cometh to me, with a view to close and permanent discipleship.— : a stronger word than that used in Mt., where it is a question of loving less; surprising in Lk., whose general habit is to soften hard sayings. But the logion is presented in different lights in the two Gospels. In Mt. it is a question of being a disciple worthy of the Master ( ); in Lk. of being an effective disciple ( ). Love of friends makes discipleship difficult or impossible; on the other hand, hatred makes it easy. It is easy to be devoted to a master or cause when you hate all rival masters or interests. Therefore “hates” is the appropriate word here, but the practical meaning is love less, which in experience signifies: hating other objects of affection in so far as they present themselves as hindrances to the supreme love of the Master.— , (not in Mt.): to be most “hated” just because most loved, and excercising the most entangling influence.— , and moreover. The ([119] [120]) binds all the particulars named into one bundle of renuncianda.— , life, oneself, most loved of all, therefore forming the climax, and also determining the sense of . The disciple is to hate friends as he can hate himself—“secundam eam partem, secundum quam se ipsum odisse debet, a Christo aversam” (Bengel). This last item in the list of things to be hated represents the idea contained in Matthew 10:39.

[119] Codex Vaticanus (sæc. iv.), published in photographic facsimile in 1889 under the care of the Abbate Cozza-Luzi.

[120] Codex Regius--eighth century, represents an ancient text, and is often in agreement with and B.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 14:26". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-14.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Hate not, &c. The law of Christ does not allow us to hate even our enemies, much less our parents: but the meaning of the text is, that we must be in the at disposition of soul so as to be willing to renounce and part with every thing, how near or dear soever it may be to us, that would keep us from following Christ. (Challoner) --- The word hate is not to be taken in its proper sense, but to be expounded by the words of Christ, (Matthew x. 37.) that no man must love his father more than God, &c. (Witham) --- Christ wishes to shew us what dispositions are necessary in him who desires to become his disciple; (Theophylactus) and to teach us that we must not be discouraged, if we meet with many hardships and labours in our journey to our heavenly country. (St. Gregory) --- And if for our sakes, Christ even renounced his own mother, saying, Who is my mother, and who are my brethren? why do you wish to be treated more delicately than your Lord? (St. Ambrose) --- He wished also to demonstrate to us, that the hatred he here inculcates, is not to proceed from any disaffection towards our parents, but from charity for ourselves; for immediately he adds, and his own life also. From which words it is evident, that in our love we must hate our brethren as we do ourselves.

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Luke 14:26". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/luke-14.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

If any. The case being assumed. App-118.

hate not. See Matthew 10:37.

life = soul. See App-110.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 14:26". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-14.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(26) If any man come to me, and hate not his father.—Like words had been spoken before, as in Matthew 10:37-39, where see Notes. Here they appear in a yet stronger form, “not hating” taking the place of “loving more,” and they are spoken, not to the Twelve only, but to the whole multitude of eager would-be followers. Self-renunciation, pushed, if necessary, to the extremest issues, is with Jesus the one indispensable condition of discipleship. He asks for nothing less than the heart, and that cannot be given by halves.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 14:26". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-14.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

If any man come to me, and hate not his father, and mother, and wife, and children, and brethren, and sisters, yea, and his own life also, he cannot be my disciple.
any
Deuteronomy 13:6-8; 33:9; Psalms 73:25,26; Matthew 10:37; Philippians 3:8
hate
Genesis 29:30,31; Deuteronomy 21:15; Job 7:15,16; Ecclesiastes 2:17-19; Malachi 1:2,3; John 12:25; Romans 9:13
yea
Acts 20:24; Revelation 12:11
Reciprocal: Genesis 12:1 - Get;  Genesis 22:3 - GeneralExodus 32:27 - slay every man;  Leviticus 21:11 - his father;  Numbers 10:30 - GeneralDeuteronomy 13:9 - But;  Deuteronomy 21:13 - and bewail;  Ruth 1:15 - return;  1 Samuel 2:29 - and honourest;  Psalm 45:10 - forget;  Psalm 139:22 - hate them;  Proverbs 13:24 - GeneralProverbs 23:26 - give;  Ecclesiastes 3:8 - a time to hate;  Daniel 6:10 - when;  Zechariah 13:3 - and his;  Matthew 4:22 - GeneralMatthew 13:21 - for;  Matthew 18:8 - if;  Matthew 19:29 - or brethren;  Mark 1:20 - they left;  Mark 8:34 - follow;  Mark 9:47 - thine;  Luke 6:47 - cometh;  Luke 9:23 - If;  Luke 9:58 - Jesus;  Luke 9:61 - but;  Luke 11:29 - when;  Luke 14:20 - GeneralLuke 14:33 - GeneralLuke 16:13 - hate;  Luke 18:29 - There;  John 14:2 - if;  Acts 5:13 - of;  Philippians 2:21 - all;  Philippians 3:7 - GeneralColossians 3:19 - love;  2 Timothy 3:12 - shall;  2 Timothy 4:10 - having;  Hebrews 12:1 - let us lay;  1 Peter 2:21 - even

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 14:26". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-14.html.

Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible

Luke 14:26

"If anyone comes to me and does not hate his father and mother, his wife and children, his brothers and sisters—yes, even his own life—he cannot be my disciple. And anyone who does not carry his cross and follow me cannot be my disciple."Luke 14:26-27

There is no middle path to heaven—there is no intermediate state between hell and heaven; no purgatory for that numerous class who think themselves hardly good enough for heaven, yet hardly bad enough for hell. No; there is no intermediate road nor state. We must win Christ as our own most blessed Jesus, and with him enjoy the happiness and glory of heaven, or sink down to hell with all our sins upon our head beneath his most terrible frown. The soul then that has been charmed with the beauty and blessedness of Jesus longs to win him, and that not for a day, month, or year, but for eternity; for in obtaining him, it obtains all that God can give the soul of man to enjoy as created immortal and for immortality.

Under the influence of his grace, it feels at times, even here below, all its immortal powers springing forth into active, heavenly life, and looks forward in faith and hope to a glorious eternity, where it will be put into possession of the highest enjoyment which God can give to Prayer of Manasseh, even union with himself by virtue of union with his dear Song of Solomon, according to those wonderful words of the Redeemer himself—"That they all may be one; as you, Father, are in me, and I in you, that they also may be one in us" ( John 17:21).

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Philpot, Joseph Charles. "Commentary on Luke 14:26". Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jcp/luke-14.html.