Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 15:18

I will get up and go to my father, and will say to him, "Father, I have sinned against heaven, and in your sight;
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Afflictions and Adversities;   God Continued...;   Jesus, the Christ;   Jesus Continued;   Joy;   Penitent;   Prodigal Son;   Readings, Select;   Repentance;   Salvation;   Servant;   Sin;   Young Men;   Thompson Chain Reference - Bible Stories for Children;   Children;   Confession of Sin;   Home;   Humble;   Humility;   Humility-Pride;   Pleasant Sunday Afternoons;   Prodigal Son;   Religion;   Sin;   Son;   Stories for Children;   The Topic Concordance - Losing and Things Lost;   Salvation;   Seeking;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Afflictions Made Beneficial;   Anger of God, the;   Mercy;   Mercy of God, the;   Parables;   Repentance;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Parable;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Grace;   Heaven;   Kingdom of god;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Christ, Christology;   Gospel;   Guilt;   Kingdom of God;   CARM Theological Dictionary - Parable;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Gospels;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Harmony of the Gospels;   Imagery;   Jesus, Life and Ministry of;   Luke, Gospel of;   Parables;   Prodigal Son;   Repentance;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Confession;   Love, Lover, Lovely, Beloved;   Parable;   Repentance;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Brotherhood (2);   Children of God;   Confession (of Sin);   Father, Fatherhood;   Gospel (2);   Justice (2);   Love (2);   Luke, Gospel According to;   Man (2);   Parable;   Quotations (2);   Reconciliation;   Religious Experience;   Repentance (2);   Righteous, Righteousness;   Sanctify, Sanctification;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chief parables and miracles in the bible;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Children of God;   Forgiveness;  
Devotionals:
Chip Shots from the Ruff of Life - Devotion for November 6;   Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for January 25;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Against heaven - Εις τον ουρανον ; that is, against God. The Jews often make use of this periphrasis in order to avoid mentioning the name of God, which they have ever treated with the utmost reverence. But some contend that it should be translated, even unto heaven; a Hebraism for, I have sinned exceedingly - beyond all description.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 15:18". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-15.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

I will arise - This is a common expression among the Hebrews to denote “entering on a piece of business.” It does not imply that he was “sitting,” but that he meant immediately to return. This should be the feeling of every sinner who is conscious of his guilt and danger.

To My father - To his father, although he had offended him, and treated him unkindly, and had provoked him, and dishonored him by his course of conduct. So the sinner. He has nowhere else to go but to “God.” He has offended him, but he may trust in his kindness. If “God” does not save him he cannot be saved. There is no other being that has an arm strong enough to deliver from sin; and though it is painful for a man to go to one whom he has offended - though he cannot go but with shame and confusion of face - yet, unless the sinner is willing to go to “God” and confess his faults, he can never be saved.

I have sinned - I have been wicked, dissipated, ungrateful, and rebellious.

Against heaven - The word “heaven” here, as it is often elsewhere, is put for God. I have sinned against “God.” See Matthew 21:25. It is also to be observed that one evidence of the genuineness of repentance is the feeling that our sins have been committed chiefly against “God.” Commonly we think most of our offences as committed against “man;” but when the sinner sees the true character of his sins, he sees that they have been aimed chiefly against “God,” and that the sins against “man” are of little consequence compared with those against God. So David, even after committing the crimes of adultery and murder after having inflicted the deepest injury on “man” - yet felt that the sin as committed against “God” shut every other consideration out of view: “Against thee, thee only, have I sinned,” etc., Psalm 2:4.

Before thee - This means the same as “against” thee. The offences had been committed mainly against God, but they were to be regarded, also, as sins against his “father,” in wasting property which he had given him, in neglecting his counsels, and in plunging himself into ruin. He felt that he had “disgraced” such a father. A sinner will be sensible of his sins against his relatives and friends as well as against God. A true penitent will be as ready to “acknowledge” his offences against his fellow-men as those against his Maker.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 15:18". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-15.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

I will arise and go to my father, and will say unto him, Father, I have sinned against heaven, and in thy sight: I am no more worthy to be called thy son: make me as one of thy hired servants.

A good resolution is the beginning of a better life; and all of the ultimate restoration of this prodigal turned upon this resolution and his prompt execution of it.

I have sinned against heaven ... There is a great depth of perception in this. Sin has a dreadful recoil against the sinner, being against himself, and also against his family, against society and against every good and beautiful thing on earth; but primarily sin is "against God." It was the perception of Joseph that the suggested sin with the wife of Potiphar was not so much against his master, or against the master's wife, as it was against God. "How then can I do this great wickedness and sin against God?" (Genesis 39:10).

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 15:18". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-15.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

I will arise,.... This is the resolution which at last, through divine grace, he came into: he determines to quit the country, and his companions; he had left his harlots, and his old course of living before, but was in the same country still; for this a man may do, and yet remain unregenerate: but he is now for leaving the country itself, and his new acquaintance; he is now determined to drop his legal preacher, to be gone out of his fields, and from under his ministry, and to leave his swine and husks;

and go to my father: not to his old companions in debauchery and sin; nor to his elder brother, the Pharisees; he had made trial of both these to his cost already; nor to his father's servants, but to his father himself; to which he was moved and encouraged, from his being ready to perish, from the fulness of bread in his father's house and from the relation he stood in to him; notwithstanding, all that had passed, he was his father, and a kind and merciful one: this shows, that he knew him as his father, having now the Spirit of adoption sent down into him; and the way unto him, which lies through Christ the mediator:

and will say unto him, father; or, "my father", as the Syriac and Persic versions read:

I have sinned against heaven; by preferring earthly things to heavenly ones; and have sinned openly in the face of the heavens, who were witnesses against him; and against God, who dwells in heaven. It was usual with the Jews to call God, שמים, "heaven"; See Gill on Matthew 21:25. They have this very phrase;

"there is a man, (sayF2Midrash Kohclet, in c. 9. 12. fol. 79. 4. they), who sins against earth, and he does not הטא בשמים, "sin against heaven"; against heaven, and he does not sin against earth: but he that speaks with an ill tongue sins against heaven and earth, as it is said, Psalm 73:9 "they set their mouth against the heavens and their tongue walketh through the earth."'

And so the sense is, that he had sinned against God himself, and not merely against men, and human laws. All sin is a transgression of the law of God; and the thought of sin being committed against a God of infinite holiness, justice, goodness, grace, and mercy, is cutting to a sensible sinner: and this being the case, this man determined to go to God his Father, and him only, for the pardon of his sin, against whom it was committed. It is added,

and before thee; for he was now convinced of his omniscience. Sin may be committed against a man, and not before him, or he not know it; but whatever is committed against God, is before him, it is in his sight, he knows it: he is God omniscient, though sinners take no notice of this perfection of his, but go on in sin, as if it was not seen, known, and observed by God. But when God works powerfully and effectually upon the heart of a sinner, he convinces him of his omniscience, as this man was convinced: hence he determined to go to God, and acknowledge his sin before him; and that it was committed before him, and was in his sight; and that he could not be justified in his sight by any righteousness of his own; and therefore humbly desires pardon at his hands. This man's sense of sin and sorrow for it, and confession of it, appear very right and genuine, which he determined to express; they appear to be the convictions of the Spirit of God: it was not a sense of sin, and sorrow for it, as done before men, but God; and the concern was not so much for the mischief that comes by sin, as for the evil that was in it; and this did not drive him to despair, as in the cases of Cain and Judas, but brought him home to his father; and his confession appears to be hearty, sincere, and without excuse.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 15:18". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-15.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

I will arise and go to my father, and will say unto him, Father, I have sinned against b heaven, and before thee,

(b) Against God, because he is said to dwell in heaven.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Luke 15:18". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/luke-15.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

I will arise and go to my FATHER — The change has come at last, and what a change! - couched in terms of such exquisite simplicity and power as if expressly framed for all heart-broken penitents.

Father, etc. — Mark the term. Though “no more worthy to be called his son,” the prodigal sinner is taught to claim the defiled, but still existing relationship, asking not to be made a servant, but remaining a son to be made “as a servant,” willing to take the lowest place and do the meanest work. Ah! and is it come to this? Once it was, “Any place rather than home.” Now, “Oh, that home! Could I but dare to hope that the door of it would not be closed against me, how gladly would I take any place and do any work, happy only to be there at all.” Well, that is conversion - nothing absolutely new, yet all new; old familiar things seen in a new light and for the first time as realities of overwhelming magnitude and power. How this is brought about the parable says not. (We have that abundantly elsewhere, Philippians 2:13, etc.). Its one object is to paint the welcome home of the greatest sinners, when (no matter for the present how) they “arise and go to their Father.”

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 15:18". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-15.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

I will arise and go (αναστας προρευσομαιanastas proreusomai). This determination is the act of the will after he comes to himself and sees his real condition.

I did sin (ημαρτονhēmarton). That is the hard word to say and he will say it first. The word means to miss the mark. I shot my bolt and I missed my aim (compare the high-handed demand in Luke 15:12).

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 15:18". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-15.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

I will arise and go to my father, and will say unto him, Father, I have sinned against heaven, and before thee,

I will arise and go to my father — How accurately are the first steps of true repentance here pointed out! Against Heaven - Against God.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 15:18". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-15.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

But when he came to himself1 he said, How many hired servants of my father's have bread enough and to spare, and I perish here with hunger!

  1. But when he came to himself. His previous state had been one of delusion and semi-madness (Ecclesiastes 9:3); in it his chief desire had been to get away from home, but returning reason begets a longing to return thither.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 15:18". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-15.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Scofield's Reference Notes

sinned

Sin. (See Scofield "Romans 3:23").

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Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Luke 15:18". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/luke-15.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

18 I will arise and go to my father, and will say unto him, Father, I have sinned against heaven, and before thee,

Ver. 18. Against heaven and before thee] That is, I have not only thee, but the whole heaven for a swift witness against me of mine offences and outbursts. "The heaven doth declare mine iniquity, and the earth riseth up against me," Job 20:27.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 15:18". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-15.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Luke 15:18

I. Note the awaking or arising of the soul out of sheer worldliness into a condition of godliness. A life of worldliness is unmanly, for it falls short of that for which man's capacities plainly indicate that he was born. It is undutiful, for it withholds from the Father of our spirits the trust and love and gratitude we owe to Him It is perilous, for even if we make no account of the direct retributions of the great day of judgment, the spirit of the worldly man is being trained and moulded into a character which will be lasting as his being, and will render him for ever unfit for the society of God and His Holy One.

II. I will arise out of this condition of estrangement, and seek reconciliation with my Father. God is the Creator, we are His creatures. He is the King, we are His subjects. But above all He is the Father, we are His children. It is no longer a philosophic and wild speculation, but the most certain and of practical truths, that God and man are Father and child. But it is likewise a truth certified by many signs, and above all, by our own consciousness, that the tie between this Father and child has been somehow broken. That we do not trust, that we do not love, that we do not obey, we know too well. We are in a state of estrangement from our Father, and such a state must ever be both criminal and miserable. Its consequences, if not averted by a timely healing of the breach, must be eternally disastrous. Say, with the Son in the parable, "I have sinned." The Father whom you have wronged so grievously, whose deep displeasure you have incurred, has not ceased to love you. He sees the misery to which you have reduced yourselves; He waits and watches for the first sign of your awaking to a sense of your sin, and He will welcome you back to His home.

J. Kennedy, Christian World Pulpit, vol. ix., p. 289.


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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Luke 15:18". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/luke-15.html.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

18. ἀναστάς] See Luke 15:24, νεκρὸς ἦν καὶ ἀνέζησεν [it was truly a resurrection from the dead]. This resolution is a further step than his last reflection. In it he no where gives up his sonship: this, and the πάτερ, lie at the root of his penitence:—it is the thought of having sinned against (in the parable itself, Heaven and) Thee, which works now in him. And accordingly he does not resolve to ask to be made ἕνα τῶν μισθ. but ὡς ἕνα τ. μ.:—still a son, but as an hireling. “And what is it that gives the sinner now a sure ground of confidence, that returning to God he shall not be repelled, nor cast out? The adoption of sonship which he received in Christ Jesus at his baptism, and his faith that the gifts and calling of God are without repentance or recall.” Trench, Par. in loc.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 15:18". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-15.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 15:18. ἀναστὰς, having arisen) The first steps of repentance are herein accurately indicated.— πάτερ, Father) The name, Father, remains the same [His willingness to receive us in that character, as our Father, remains], even though the sons he degenerate.— εἰς τὸν οὐρανὸν, against heaven) Comp. Luke 15:7 [which implies that the inhabitants of heaven have a concern in the sinner’s recovery, and therefore also in the fall of the sinner, who accordingly in part sins against them].

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 15:18". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-15.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Ver. 18-20. The way of a sinner’s returning to God must be by arising, going to the Father, confessing his sins with the aggravations of them, disclaiming any goodness, any righteousness in himself, humbling himself to God’s footstool.

I will arise (saith the prodigal) and go to my father, and will say unto him, Father, I have sinned against heaven, and before thee, and am no more worthy to be called thy son: make me as one of thy hired servants. And he arose, and came to his father. He arose from the sleep and bed of sin, and came unto his father. We are not here told by whose strength, or in whose assistance, he arose and came. We must remember that our Saviour is here representing a spiritual notion by an ordinary human action; now men have an innate power to natural motions, though not to spiritual actions. We are elsewhere told, that no man cometh to the Father, but by Christ, nor doth any man come unto the Son, but he whom the Father draweth. Every one as he is taught of the Father cometh unto the Son. And again, that though we be saved by faith, yet it is not of ourselves, it is the gift of God; and, it is given to us in the behalf of Christ to believe, Philippians 1:29. These are but several expressions signifying, by the tender affections and gracious reception of earthly parents of a returning prodigal son, the exceeding readiness of our heavenly Father to receive penitent sinners; he is so far from discouraging great sinners from taking up thoughts of returning unto him, that he cherisheth the embryos of such resolutions: I said, (saith the psalmist), I will confess my transgressions unto the Lord; and thou forgavest the iniquity of my sin, Psalms 32:5. God seeth the first good motions and stirrings of our hearts towards him, and he needs must do so, for he stirreth them up in us; there is no sacred fire upon our altar, but first cometh down from heaven. While yet the soul is far off from believing, and closing with Christ actually, and hath but some thoughts of that tendency, God looks upon it, encourages it, meeteth it as it were half way; and indeed if he did not, our goodness would be but like a morning dew, which would quickly pass away; our first inclinations would perish like an untimely birth, before it hath seen the light.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 15:18". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-15.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

скажу ему Он тщательно обдумал, что он скажет, и учел все возможные последствия своего покаяния (ст. 19).

согрешил против неба Эвфемизм, означающий, что он согрешил против Бога. Он не только осознал бесполезность своего положения, он также понял серьезность своих прегрешений против отца.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 15:18". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-15.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Against heaven; against God as well as against his father.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 15:18". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-15.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

18.I have sinned—Very different from his bold address, (Luke 15:12,) Give me the portion. Confession is good for the soul.

Against heaven—Against the divine authority of God as Creator, and against the law of right and nature.

And before thee—It was from the former, heaven, that the famine came upon the land. It was from the latter, thee, that the son wandered, and to whom he was now returning, 19. As one of thy hired servants—This son embodies in himself all classes of wanderers and aliens from God, both Jew and Gentile. As Jew he has a natural born sonship. But as Gentile, though he has also a natural born sonship in the back ground, he now takes position as an alien. And then when the father forthwith restores him to sonship, he who is in symbol even the alien, becomes a true son in the Gospel acceptance.

No more worthy to be called thy son—He says truth. He has forfeited his birthright.

If a man by free voluntary sin lose the grace to which he is born, and which meets him from the atonement at the threshold of life, being symbolized in his circumcision or baptism, he is only a son as all others are sons, and must return to God as a returned alien. It is the mercy of God which restores his sonship.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 15:18". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-15.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 15:18. I will arise. Correct reflection led to remembrance of the father, that feeling led to resolve and corresponding action. The will is turned: he proposes to leave the far country.

I have sinned. There can be no return to God which does not include the confession of sin.

Against heaven and in thy sight (as in Luke 15:21), in relation to this. The two are separated in the parable, but are to be identified in the interpretation. He alone really confesses his sins, who has regarded them mainly as sins against God, against a higher, heavenly order of things; and this is the best sign that a sinner has come to himself.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 15:18". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-15.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 15:18. : a bright hope gives energy to the starving man; home! Said, done, but the motive is not high. It is simply the last resource of a desperate man. He will go home and confess his fault, and so, he hopes, get at least a hireling’s fare. Well to be brought out of that land, under home influences, by any motive. It is in the right direction. Yet though bread is as yet the supreme consideration, foretokens of true ethical repentance appear in the premeditated speech:— : some sense of the claims that long-disused word implies— , I erred; perception that the whole past has been a mistake and folly— , against heaven, God— , in thy sight, in thy judgment (Hahn)—he knows quite well what his father must think of his conduct; what a fool he must think him (Psalms 73:22)— , etc. (Luke 15:19), fully conscious that he has forfeited all filial claims. The omission of suits the emotional mood.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 15:18". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-15.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

merciful is the Almighty, who, though so much offended, still does not disdain the name of father. --- I have sinned. These are the first words of a sinner's confession to the author of nature. God knows all things; still does he expect to hear the voice of your confession. It is in vain to think of concealing your sins from the eyes of him whom nothing can escape; and there can be no danger of acknowledging to him what his infinite knowledge has already embraced. Confess then that Christ may intercede for you, the Church pray for you, the people pour forth their tears for you. Fear not that you cannot obtain pardon, for pardon is promised to you; grace, and a reconciliation with a most tender parent, are held out to you. (St. Ambrose) --- Before thee, &c. By this does our Redeemer shew, that the Almighty is here to be understood by the name of father: for the all-seeing eye of God only beholds all things, from whom even the secret machinations of the heart cannot be concealed. (St. John Chrysostom in St. Thomas Aquinas)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Luke 15:18". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/luke-15.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

to. Greek. pros. App-104.

sinned. App-128.

against. Greek. eis. App-104.

heaven. Singular with Art. See notes on Matthew 6:9, Matthew 6:10. "Heaven" put by Figure of speech Metonymy (of Subject), App-6, for God Himself.

before. Greek. enopion. Same word as in Luke 15:10 "in the presence of".

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 15:18". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-15.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

I will arise and go to my father, and will say unto him, Father, I have sinned against heaven, and before thee,

I will arise and go to my father. The change has come at last, and what a change!-couched in terms of such exquisite simplicity and power as expressly framed for all heart-broken penitents.

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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 15:18". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-15.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(18) I will arise and go to my father.—This, then, was the firstfruits of repentance. He remembers that he has a father, and trusts in that father’s love; but he dares not claim the old position which he had so recklessly cast away. He is content to be as one of the “hired servants.” Spiritually, the first impulse of the contrite heart is to take the lowest place, to wish for the drudgery of daily duties, or even menial service, if only it may be near its Father in heaven, and by slow degrees regain His favour and earn the wages of His praise.

I have sinned . . .—More strictly, I sinned, as going back in thought to the first act of sin as virtually including all that grew out of it.

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 15:18". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-15.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

I will arise and go to my father, and will say unto him, Father, I have sinned against heaven, and before thee,
will arise
1 Kings 20:30,31; 2 Kings 7:3,4; 2 Chronicles 33:12,13,19; Psalms 32:5; 116:3-7; Jeremiah 31:6-9; 50:4,5; Lamentations 3:18-22,29,40; Hosea 2:6,7; 14:1-3; Jonah 2:4; 3:9
Father
11:2; Isaiah 63:16; Jeremiah 3:19; 31:20; Matthew 6:9,14; 7:11
I have
18:13; Leviticus 26:40,41; 1 Kings 8:47,48; Job 33:27,28; 36:8-10; Psalms 25:11; Psalms 32:3-5; 51:3-5; Proverbs 23:13; Matthew 3:6; 1 John 1:8-10
against
21; Daniel 4:26
Reciprocal: Exodus 32:30 - Ye have;  Deuteronomy 32:6 - thy father;  1 Samuel 7:6 - We have sinned;  1 Chronicles 21:8 - I have sinned;  2 Chronicles 6:37 - We have sinned;  2 Chronicles 12:7 - the Lord;  Job 40:4 - Behold;  Job 42:6 - I;  Psalm 126:6 - shall doubtless;  Proverbs 5:13 - GeneralProverbs 21:29 - he directeth;  Proverbs 28:13 - whoso;  Ecclesiastes 7:14 - but;  Isaiah 65:24 - GeneralJeremiah 3:13 - acknowledge;  Jeremiah 14:20 - for;  Lamentations 1:20 - for;  Lamentations 3:42 - transgressed;  Ezekiel 18:28 - he considereth;  Daniel 9:15 - we have sinned;  Micah 7:9 - bear;  Zechariah 1:3 - Turn;  Matthew 15:27 - Truth;  Matthew 21:29 - he repented;  Luke 15:17 - How;  Luke 20:4 - from;  Luke 23:41 - we indeed;  1 Corinthians 11:31 - General2 Thessalonians 3:14 - that he

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 15:18". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-15.html.