Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 15:2

Both the Pharisees and the scribes began to grumble, saying, "This man receives sinners and eats with them."
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Bigotry;   Jesus, the Christ;   Jesus Continued;   Pharisees;   Repentance;   Salvation;   Self-Righteousness;   Thompson Chain Reference - Censoriousness;   Charitableness-Uncharitableness;   Christ;   Fault-Finding;   Outcasts Received;   The Topic Concordance - Repentance;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Humility of Christ, the;   Jews, the;   Murmuring;   Pharisees, the;   Shepherds;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Parables;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Forgiveness;   Sin;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Heifer, Red;   Parable;   Pharisees;   Publican;   Zacchaeus;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Gospel;   Jesus, Life and Ministry of;   Luke, Gospel of;   Mammon;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Love, Lover, Lovely, Beloved;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Character;   Children of God;   Courage;   Father, Fatherhood;   Gospel (2);   Ideas (Leading);   Liberty (2);   Mission;   Murmur, Murmuring ;   Nationality;   Perfection (of Jesus);   Reality;   Reconciliation;   Sinners;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Eating;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Grudge;   Justification;   Murmur;   Parable;   Sinner;  
Devotionals:
Every Day Light - Devotion for November 14;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Receiveth sinners - Προσδεχεται . He receives them cordially, affectionately - takes them to his bosom; for so the word implies. What mercy! Jesus receives sinners in the most loving, affectionate manner, and saves them unto eternal life! Reader, give glory to God for ever!

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 15:2". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-15.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Murmured - They affected to suppose that if Jesus treated sinners kindly he must be fond of their society, and be a man of similar character. “They” considered it disgraceful to be with them or to eat with them, and they, therefore, brought a charge against him for it. They “would” not suppose that he admitted them to his society for the purpose of doing them good; nor did they remember that the very object of his coming was to call the wicked from their ways and to save them from death.

Receiveth sinners - Receives them in a tender manner; treats them with kindness; does not drive them from his presence.

And eateth with them - Contrary to the received maxims of the scribes. By eating with them he showed that he did not despise or overlook them.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 15:2". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-15.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And the Pharisees and Scribes murmured,.... When they saw the easy access these wicked men had to Christ; and that he stopped and stayed with them, and very freely imparted instructions to them: saying,

this man receiveth sinners. The Persic version reads, "publicans and sinners", as in the preceding verse: the word "man" is not in the original text, it is only "this"; which is to be understood not by way of eminence, as this great person, this prophet, this master in Israel; but by way of diminution and reproach, this fellow; as it is sometimes supplied: the word "man" be very rightly inserted, for they took him to be a mere man; though it is certain he was more than a man, even the true and mighty God; and therefore was able to save those sinners that came to him: and great condescension and grace did he show in receiving them who were "sinners", not only by nature, but by practice; and not merely guilty of common infirmities, but were notorious sinners, covetous, extortioners, oppressors of the poor, and very debauched persons; and such as these Christ "receives": hence no man should be discouraged from coming to Christ, on account of sin; all that do come to him, should come as sinners, for he receives them as such; nor does he receive any for any worthiness there is in them: these persons he received first at his Father's hand, as he did all the elect, as his portion, and to be preserved and saved by him; with all gifts, grace, blessings, and promises for them; and in consequence of this, he receives them upon their coming to him as sinners, into his open love and affection, into his arms; which denotes communion and protection; into his house and family, and not only to hear him preach, or preached, but to converse and eat with him at his table, and even to live by faith upon him; and when he has freed them from all their sins, he will receive them to himself in glory. And there is the greatest reason imaginable to believe, that Christ still does, and will receive sinners; since he came to save the chief of sinners; and has bore their sins, and died for them; and now makes intercession for transgressors; and by the ministers of the word calls sinners to repentance.

And eateth with them; as he did in the houses of Matthew the publican, and of Zaccheus; see Matthew 9:10 each of which occasioned great murmurings among the Pharisees; and who therefore traduced him as a friend of publicans and sinners; and he is indeed so in the best sense: and not only did he eat with them corporeally, but in a spiritual sense, as he still does; admitting them into his house to eat of the provisions of it, to live on him the bread of life, to sup with him, and he with them; and feeding and delighting himself in the exercise of those graces, which he himself is the donor and author of, in them.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 15:2". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-15.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

murmured, saying, etc. — took it ill, were scandalized at Him, and insinuated (on the principle that a man is known by the company he keeps) that He must have some secret sympathy with their character. But oh, what a truth of unspeakable preciousness do their lips, as on other occasions, unconsciously utter., Now follow three parables representing the sinner:

(1)in his stupidity;

(2)as all-unconscious of his lost condition;

(3)knowingly and willingly estranged from God [Bengel].

The first two set forth the seeking love of God; the last, His receiving love [Trench].

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 15:2". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-15.html. 1871-8.

People's New Testament

Pharisees. The orthodox leaders.

Scribes. Primarily copyists, but also the great theologians.

Eateth with them. That he should be on social terms with sinners the Pharisees could not overlook.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on Luke 15:2". "People's New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/luke-15.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Both  …  and (τε καιte  …  διεγογγυζονkai). United in the complaint.

Murmured (διαγογγυζωdiegogguzon). Imperfect active of διαdiagogguzō late Greek compound in the lxx and Byzantine writers. In the N.T. only here and Luke 19:7. The force of ουτοςdia here is probably between or among themselves. It spread (imperfect tense) whenever these two classes came in contact with Jesus. As the publicans and the sinners were drawing near to Jesus just in that proportion the Pharisees and the scribes increased their murmurings. The social breach is here an open yawning chasm.

This man (προσδεχεταιhoutos). A contemptuous sneer in the use of the pronoun. They spoke out openly and probably pointed at Jesus.

Receiveth (προσδεχομαιprosdechetai). Present middle indicative of the common verb υπεδεχατοprosdechomai In Luke 12:36 we had it for expecting, here it is to give access to oneself, to welcome like και συνεστιει αυτοιςhupedexato of Martha‘s welcome to Jesus (Luke 10:38). The charge here is that this is the habit of Jesus. He shows no sense of social superiority to these outcasts (like the Hindu “untouchables” in India).

And eateth with them (αυτοιςkai sunesthiei autois). Associative instrumental case (συνautois) after πιλοςsun - in composition. This is an old charge (Luke 5:30) and a much more serious breach from the standpoint of the Pharisees. The implication is that Jesus prefers these outcasts to the respectable classes (the Pharisees and the scribes) because he is like them in character and tastes, even with the harlots. There was a sting in the charge that he was the “friend” (philos) of publicans and sinners (Luke 7:34).

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 15:2". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-15.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

The Fourfold Gospel

And both the Pharisees and the scribes murmured, saying, This man receiveth sinners, and eateth with them.

  1. And both the Pharisees and scribes murmured. In answer to their murmuring, Jesus spoke three parables, in which he set forth the yearnings of redemptive love. Having thus replied to the Pharisees, Jesus continued his discourse, adding two other parables, concerning the right employment of worldly goods, and ending with some teaching concerning offenses, etc. We defer comparing the parables until we have discussed them.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 15:2". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-15.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Eateth with them; lives familiarly with them.

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Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Luke 15:2". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/luke-15.html. 1878.

Scofield's Reference Notes

sinners

Sin. (See Scofield "Romans 3:23").

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Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Luke 15:2". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/luke-15.html. 1917.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

PENITENCE AND COMMUNION

‘This Man receiveth sinners.’

Luke 15:2

Among the many devices of the Enemy, against which the Christian has to be put upon his guard, one of the most dangerous is that of making mistakes as to right and wrong. No sooner does Satan find that we begin to resist open temptations than he seeks to make us go wrong through deception. Especially is this the case with humble and penitent souls, men who are sorry for what they have done wrong and are wishing to do right, but are afraid of themselves and hardly dare consider themselves Christians at all. And, perhaps, the thing above all others that Satan sets himself to deceive them about is that which they most need—the help and comfort of Holy Communion.

Let us consider some of those points of connection between the blessings of Holy Communion and the condition and needs of the penitent. That there is such a connection we all know. Our Prayer Book, our Communion Service, brings it into special prominence.

I. Who are they that are invited to Holy Communion?—‘Ye that do truly and earnestly repent you of your sins …’ This is its Invitation. And then, when we accept the Invitation and draw near to the Holy Mysteries, how, and in what words, do we accept it? We reply, ‘We do earnestly repent, and are heartily sorry,’ etc. So, then, the Invitation is sent forth to the penitent, and it is the penitent who accepts it. It is only as penitent men and women that we venture to accept it. There must, therefore, be some special connection between the Holy Communion and penitence. What follows then? Clearly this:—

II. That it is a tremendous mistake to imagine that Holy Communion is intended to be kept back as the peculiar privilege of the advanced Christian.

III. That it is intended for the comfort of the penitent.

IV. That none, not even the best of men, the purest and the holiest, can ever approach this Holy Feast except in the character of a penitent.—It is only those who in this life wear the robe of penitence who will wear the wedding garment of Christ’s righteousness at the marriage supper of the Lamb hereafter.

Thus, then, our Communion Service makes it clear and certain that Holy Communion is for the penitent, and the penitent for the Holy Communion. Here we have an application of our text, ‘This Man receiveth sinners.’

Illustration

‘Let me tell you how Charles Simeon lost the burden of his sin by casting it in faith on the Redeemer, and how he found, to his endless comfort, that Christ receives sinners. When he was a young man of about twenty, at Cambridge, he was for some months in great distress about his soul, which, as he says, might well have continued for years; but, as he tells us himself, “in Easter week, as I was reading Bishop Wilson on the Lord’s Supper, I met with an expression to this effect: ‘That the Jews knew what they did when they transferred their sin to the head of their offering.’ The thought rushed into my mind: What! May I transfer all my guilt to another? Has God provided an Offering for me, that I may lay my sins on His head? Then, God willing, I will not bear them on my own soul one moment longer. Accordingly I sought to lay my sins on the sacred head of Jesus; and on the Wednesday began to have a hope of mercy; on the Thursday that hope increased; on the Friday and Saturday it became more strong; and on the Sunday morning (Easter Day) I awoke early with these words upon my heart and lips, ‘Jesus Christ is risen to-day; Hallelujah! Hallelujah!’ From that hour peace flowed in rich abundance into my soul; and at the Lord’s Table in our chapel I had the sweetest access to God through my Blessed Saviour.”’

(SECOND OUTLINE)

CHRIST RECEIVETH SINFUL MEN

‘This Man receiveth sinners.’ I rejoice to know my Saviour was Man. God is so great and holy that I should fear Him, stained as I am with sin. But the Face of Jesus Christ gives me confidence and joy.

I. He receives them into His heart to be forgiven.—If you have read the Pilgrim’s Progress you will remember that when Christian got to the ‘wicket-gate’ he said, ‘Here is a poor burdened sinner. I am come from the City of Destruction, but am going to Mount Zion, that I may be delivered from the wrath to come. I would therefore, sir, since I am informed that by this gate is the way thither, know if you are willing to let me in?’ Then Christ answered, ‘I am willing with all My heart,’ and with that He opened the gate. Yes, indeed, with all His heart of untold love Jesus receives sinners. So willing is He that, as George Whitfield said, ‘He even receives the devil’s castaways!’

II. He receives them into His school to be trained.—He educates them, and teaches them by His Spirit. He opens their understanding to understand the Scriptures. He is so patient, so loving, so gentle.

III. He receives them into His home.—‘In My Father’s house are many mansions’ (many abiding-places). ‘I go to prepare a place for you’ (John 14:2). He knows how we shrink from death and the world beyond the grave; therefore He calls it home. His Apostle assures all believers when they are absent from the body they are ‘at home with the Lord’ (2 Corinthians 5:8, R.V.). No one fears going home. And every Christian may say, ‘I am going home; I am going home.’

—Rev. F. Harper.

Illustration

‘He will receive the rich—Joseph of Arimathea, an example.

He will receive the poor—Lazarus, the beggar, an example.

He will receive the learned—Dionysius, the Areopagite, an example.

He will receive physicians—Luke, an example.

He will receive soldiers—the Roman centurion, an example.

He will receive fishermen—Peter, etc., examples.

He will receive extortioners—Zacchæus, an example.

He will receive tax-gathers—publicans, examples.

He will receive thieves—the dying robber, an example.

He will receive harlots—the woman who was a sinner, an example.

He will receive adulterers—the woman of Samaria, an example.

He will receive persecutors and murderers—Saul, an example.

He will receive persons possessed of devils—many examples.

He will receive backsliders—Peter, an example.

He will receive persons in trade—Lydia, a seller of purple, an example.

He will receive statesmen and courtiers—the eunuch of Ethiopia, an example.

He will receive families—that of Bethany, an example.

He will receive whole multitudes—those at the day of Pentecost, an example.’

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Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Luke 15:2". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/luke-15.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 And the Pharisees and scribes murmured, saying, This man receiveth sinners, and eateth with them.

Ver. 2. But the scribes and Pharisees] Being sick of the devil’s disease, and doing his lusts, John 8:44.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 15:2". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-15.html. 1865-1868.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

2.] προσδέχ., into His circle of adherents— συνεσθ., allows them to sit at meat with Him;—on the journey, or at entertainments, as in Matthew 9:10. Stier remarks (iii. 214, edn. 2) that this ἁμαρτ. προσδέχ. is an important and affecting testimony, from the mouth of the enemies of our Lord, to His willingness to receive sinners.

The διεγόγγ. implies either throughout the journey;—or rather, one to another,—responsively.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 15:2". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-15.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 15:2. διεγόγγυζον, murmured among one another.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 15:2". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-15.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Poole on "Luke 15:2"

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 15:2". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-15.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

роптали Буквально «сильно ворчали», «выражали недовольство» в толпе. Их ропот вызвал три притчи, предназначенные для иллюстрации радости Бога о покаянии грешников.

Он принимает грешников Эта фраза – ключ к трем последующим притчам. Христос не стыдился того, что Его знали как «друга мытарям и грешникам» (7:34).

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 15:2". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-15.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Murmured; found fault with him for associating with vicious persons, or permitting them to approach him. He therefore spoke three parables, showing that God receives and rejoices over sinners who return to him, however wicked they have been; and that it was highly proper that the Saviour of sinners should do the same. Murmuring when sinners come to Christ, and uneasiness at his reception of them, are evidences of a selfish, wicked spirit, which, without a great change, can never join in the employment or partake of the bliss of heaven.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 15:2". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-15.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘And both the Pharisees and the scribes murmured, saying, “This man receives sinners, and eats with them.’

It is clear that Jesus welcomed these ‘public servants and sinners’ openly (compare Luke 5:30; Mark 2:15-16) and was willing to eat among them, quite probably often in a kind of picnic situation (as when the five thousand were fed), although no doubt sometimes being invited to people’s houses. And this was so much so that the Pharisees muttered among themselves at what they saw to be His ‘irreligious behaviour’. As they do not suggest otherwise, however, it is probable that even when doing so Jesus went to the trouble of proper cleansing in spite of the conditions. He still sought to avoid offence wherever He could. But that did not satisfy them. For even close association with such people was frowned on, and no Pharisee would have mixed with them.

It should be noted that the Pharisees and Scribes must not be seen as all bad. They would have welcomed these people one by one if they had come privately and had ‘repented’ and had been determined to follow their ways, but they would never have sought them out, and such a one would first have had to follow very rigorous procedures in order to be finally welcomed after appropriate cleansing. They therefore totally disapproved of Jesus lax approach.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 15:2". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-15.html. 2013.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

2.Pharisees and scribes—This would seem to imply that our Lord was in some populous town, where numbers of these classes were to be found. And the reply of Jesus, of which Luke doubtless gives us but an abbreviated sketch is still so full, as well as so regular and symmetrical, as to induce us to suppose that it was a public and even a synagogue discourse. It cannot be a mere collection by Luke of parables brought together by classification, but must be accepted as a threefold unit.

This man receiveth sinners—Accepts them as followers and even apostles, as Matthew.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 15:2". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-15.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 15:2. What is this that I hear of thee, i.e., explain this report.

Render the account of thy stewardship. No previous reckoning had been made: regular statements were then unusual.

Canst no longer be steward. The correctness of the report is implied. The reference is to the certainty that each must render account at death to God. Death in every case is the consequence of the wasting of the Lord’s goods. The prudence on the part of the steward began when he regarded his dismissal as certain, but took place before the dismissal itself. The reference to mammon as the lord is by no means so apt.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 15:2". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-15.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 15:2. : the conveys the idea of a general pervasive murmuring. This is probably not an instance illustrating Hermann’s remark (ad Viger., p. 856) that this preposition in compound verbs often adds the notion of striving ( , certare bibendo).— .: the ([126] [127] [128]) binds Pharisees and scribes together as one: as close a corporation as “publicans and sinners” (equivalent to “sinners” in their conception. , Luke 15:2). Note the order, Pharisees and scribes; usually the other way. Pharisees answers to sinners, scribes to publicans; the two extremes in character and calling: the holiest and unholiest; the most reputable and the most disreputable occupations. And Jesus preferred the baser group!— , receives, admits to His presence; instead of repelling with involuntary loathing.— : not only admits but also eats with them. That was the main surprise and offence, and therefore just the thing done, because the thing which, while offending the Pharisees, would certainly gain the “sinners”. Jesus did what the reputedly good would not do, so winning their trust.

[126] Codex Sinaiticus (sæc. iv.), now at St. Petersburg, published in facsimile type by its discoverer, Tischendorf, in 1862.

[127] Codex Vaticanus (sæc. iv.), published in photographic facsimile in 1889 under the care of the Abbate Cozza-Luzi.

[128] Codex Regius--eighth century, represents an ancient text, and is often in agreement with and B.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 15:2". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-15.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Pharisees. See App-120. This settles the scope of all that follows.

murmured = were muttering. The word implies subdued threatening. Occurs only here and Luke 19:7.

sinners. See on Matthew 9:10.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 15:2". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-15.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And the Pharisees and scribes murmured, saying, This man receiveth sinners, and eateth with them.

And the Pharisees and scribes murmured, saying, This man receiveth sinners, and eateth with them.

They were scandalized at His procedure, and insinuated-on the principle that a man is known by the company he keeps-that He must have some secret sympathy with their character. But what a truth of unspeakable preciousness do their lips, as on other occasions, unconsciously utter! And Jesus will show them how divine the deed is. Here, accordingly, follow three parables, illustrating the principle on which He drew them to Himself and hailed any symptoms in them of return to God. The three parables, though the same in their general import, present the sinner each of them under a different aspect. The first, as Bengel acutely and laconically remarks, represents him, in his stupidity, as a silly sheep going astray; the second, like lost property, as 'unconscious of his lost condition;' the third, as 'knowingly and willfully estranged from God.' The first two, as Trench well observes, set forth the seeking love of God; the last His receiving love.

This parable occurs again, and is recorded in Matthew 18:12-14; but there it is to show how precious one of his sheep is to the good Shepherd; here, to show that the shepherd, though it stray never so widely, will seek it out, and when he hath found, will rejoice over it.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 15:2". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-15.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

2. The Pharisees and the teachers of the Law. The Pharisees were the orthodox religious leaders. The teachers of the Law were the theologians. And even eats with them! No strict Jew could eat with Gentiles, and these people were classed in with the Gentiles. The Pharisees felt they could not close their eyes to this.

 

 

 

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Bibliographical Information
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Luke 15:2". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/luke-15.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(2) And the Pharisees and scribes . . .—Here, too, we may well believe that the speakers were some of the guests of Luke 14:15. They had followed Him to see what He would do, and were at once startled and shocked to find the Teacher who had spoken so sternly to those who were professedly godly, not only talking to, but eating with, those who were, at any rate, regarded as ungodly and sinful.

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 15:2". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-15.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And the Pharisees and scribes murmured, saying, This man receiveth sinners, and eateth with them.
29,30; 5:30; 7:34,39; 19:7; Matthew 9:11; Acts 11:3; 1 Corinthians 5:9-11; Galatians 2:12
Reciprocal: Psalm 51:17 - thou;  Isaiah 65:5 - Stand;  Matthew 9:9 - named;  Matthew 11:19 - a friend;  Matthew 20:11 - they murmured;  Matthew 21:31 - the publicans;  Mark 2:16 - How;  Mark 14:5 - And they;  Luke 3:12 - GeneralLuke 5:17 - that there;  Luke 15:28 - he;  Luke 18:9 - and despised;  John 6:41 - murmured;  John 9:24 - a sinner;  Romans 15:7 - as;  Hebrews 12:3 - contradiction

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 15:2". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-15.html.