Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 15:1

Now all the tax collectors and the sinners were coming near Him to listen to Him.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Jesus, the Christ;   Jesus Continued;   Pharisees;   Repentance;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Humility of Christ, the;   Pharisees, the;   Publicans;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Prostitution;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Hospitality;   Sin;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Frugality;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Parable;   Publican;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Brothers;   Conversion;   Gospel;   Joy;   Luke, Gospel of;   Mammon;   Prodigal Son;   Sheep;   Sinner;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Love, Lover, Lovely, Beloved;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Character;   Children of God;   Claims (of Christ);   Cosmopolitanism;   Demon, Demoniacal Possession, Demoniacs;   Discourse;   Endurance;   Father, Fatherhood;   Following;   Gospel (2);   Hearing;   Ideas (Leading);   Mission;   Perfection (of Jesus);   Personality;   Presentation ;   Publican ;   Reality;   Reconciliation;   Sinners;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Publican;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Pharisees;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Matthew;   Parable;   Tax;  
Devotionals:
Every Day Light - Devotion for November 14;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Publicans and sinners - Τελωναι και ἁμαρτωλοι, tax-gatherers and heathens; persons who neither believed in Christ nor in Moses. See the note on Luke 7:36. Concerning the tax-gatherers, see the note on Matthew 5:46.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 15:1". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-15.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Publicans and sinners - See the notes at Matthew 9:10.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 15:1". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-15.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

This, one of the most beloved chapters of the word of God, is an account of what was probably a single discourse of Jesus Christ, the whole theme of which was "The Lost." First there was the lost sheep (Luke 15:1-7), then the lost coin (Luke 15:8-10), and finally the two lost sons. It was the Saviour who rescued the lost sheep, the church (under the figure of a woman) who sought the lost coin, and the Father who patiently awaited the return of the prodigal, reinstated him with honor, and then went out and entreated the older brother. Since the church is the temple of the Holy Spirit (1 Corinthians 6:19), the activity of the entire Godhead appears here as engaged in the redemption of the lost.

There are four ways to become lost, and all of them are evident in this remarkable sermon. The sheep was lost by wandering away from the flock, the coin was lost through no fault of its own, but through the inability or carelessness of the woman. The prodigal was lost by overt and willful disobedience; and the elder brother was lost through pride, selfishness, and self-righteousness.

Now all the publicans and sinners were drawing near unto him to hear him. And both the Pharisees and scribes murmured, saying, this man receiveth sinners, and eateth with them. (Luke 15:1-2)

"Jesus had already expounded the reasons for his moving "into the streets and lanes of the city" (Luke 14:21) to include the sinners and publicans as objects of the divine mercy; and, in this great chapter, the rationale behind his holy actions was revealed. Even a single sheep, or a single coin, was something of eternal value in the eyes of the Father. God loves every man.

This man receiveth sinners ... Unconsciously, his enemies spoke in these words the Master's highest praise. Intended by them as a slander, the words have been treasured by the church of all ages as glorious and eternal truth. Set to music, and sung in ten thousand congregations of worshipers, these words have blessed millions.

Sinners Jesus will receive; Sound this word of grace to all Who the heavenly pathway leave, All who linger, all who fall.

Sing it o'er and o'er again: Christ receiveth sinful men; Make the message clear and plain: Christ receiveth sinful men![1]SIZE>

And eateth with them ... See under Luke 9:19 for an extended list of the slanders against Jesus. The attitude of those self-righteous leaders of the people who held themselves to be so far above the common class of sinners was in itself the worst of sins, and Jesus made it the climax of this sermon on the lost, as exemplified by the older brother in the third parable.

ENDNOTE:

[1] Translated from Neumeister, "Sinners Jesus Will Receive," Great Songs of the Church (Cincinnati, Ohio: Standard Publishing Company, 1937), No. 210.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 15:1". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-15.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Then drew near to him,.... To "Jesus", as the Persic and Ethiopic versions express it: this was on the sabbath day, and either when he was in the Pharisee's house, where he was invited to dinner, Luke 14:1 or rather when he came out of it, when the multitude, who could not come near him whilst there, took the opportunity of gathering about him;

even all the publicans and sinners; whom the Pharisee would not admit into his house, it being contrary to their traditions to eat, and drink, and converse with persons of such an infamous character; See Gill on Matthew 9:10, Matthew 9:11 The word "all" is omitted in the Vulgate Latin, Syriac, Persic, and Ethiopic versions; but the Arabic version has it, and the Greek copies; and signifies that there were a very large number of them, even all that were in that place, and in the adjacent cities and towns, that got together

for to hear him, or "from him", as the Arabic version; or "doctrine" from him, as the Persic version adds: these having heard much of him; and it may be, might be under some remorse of conscience on account of their vicious lives, came to hear him preach.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 15:1". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-15.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Then drew near unto 1 him a all the publicans and sinners for to hear him.

(1) We must not give up on those who have gone out of the way, but according to the example of Christ we must take great pains for them.

(a) Some publicans and sinners came to Christ from all areas.

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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Luke 15:1". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/luke-15.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Luke 15:1-32. Publicans and sinners welcomed by Christ - Three parables to explain this.

drew near  …  all the publicans and sinners, etc. — drawn around Him by the extraordinary adaptation of His teaching to their case, who, till He appeared - at least His forerunner - might well say, “No man careth for my soul.”

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 15:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-15.html. 1871-8.

People's New Testament

All the publicans and sinners were drawing near. At the period of his ministry these classes were flocking in great numbers to hear him.

Publicans. Gatherers of the Roman tribute, generally corrupt, universally despised, usually Jews by birth.

Sinners. Persons excommunicated from the synagogues and usually held as outcasts.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on Luke 15:1". "People's New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/luke-15.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

All the publicans and sinners (παντες οι τελωναι και οι αμαρτωλοιpantes hoi telōnai kai hoi hamartōloi). The two articles separate the two classes (all the publicans and the sinners). They are sometimes grouped together (Luke 5:30; Matthew 9:11), but not here. The publicans are put on the same level with the outcasts or sinners. So in Luke 14:2 the repeated article separates Pharisees and scribes as not quite one. The use of “all” here may be hyperbole for very many or the reference may be to these two classes in the particular place where Jesus was from time to time.

Were drawing near unto him (ησαν αυτωι εγγιζοντεςēsan autōi eggizontes). Periphrastic imperfect of εγγιζωeggizō from εγγυςeggus (near), late verb.

For to hear (ακουεινakouein). Just the present active infinitive of purpose.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 15:1". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-15.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

All the publicans - That is, all who were in that place. It seems our Lord was in some town of Galilee of the Gentiles, from whence he afterward went to Jerusalem, Luke 17:11 .
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 15:1". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-15.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

Now all the publicans1 and sinners2 were drawing near unto him to hear him.
    SECOND GREAT GROUP OF PARABLES. (Probably in Perea.) A. INTRODUCTION. Luke 15:1,2

  1. The publicans. See Luke 15:1,2.

  2. Sinners. The Pharisees classed as "sinners" all who failed to observe the traditions of the elders, and especially their traditional rules of purification. It was not so much the wickedness of this class as their legal uncleanness that made it wrong to eat with them. Compare Galatians 2:12,13. Also see Galatians 2:12,13.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
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J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 15:1". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-15.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

1 Then drew near unto him all the publicans and sinners for to hear him.

Ver. 1. All the publicans and sinners] Christ familiarized himself with these despised persons, and thereby much won upon them. Affability easily allureth, austerity discourageth; as it did that honest citizen, which having in himself a certain conflict of conscience, came to Master Hooper the martyr’s door for counsel; but being abashed at his austere behaviour, dared not come in, but departed, seeking remedy of his troubled mind at other men’s hands.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 15:1". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-15.html. 1865-1868.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

The publicans and sinners, as they had done several times before, came to hear our Saviour's instructions; he treated them very kindly, and conversed familiarly with them; at this the Pharisees were displeased and murmured, censured our Saviour for too much familiarity with those men, whom they looked upon as scandalous to converse with; not considering that he conversed with them as their physician, not as their companion; and therefore his proper work and employment lay among his patients: and that he might give all possible encouragement to the repentance of the greatest sinners, he sets forth at once the tender care of God in recovering such lost sinners, and the inexpressible joy that is found in heaven at the welcome news of their recovery; for thus it follows in the parables.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Luke 15:1". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/luke-15.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

1.] ἦσαν ἐγγ., were busied in drawing nearwere continually about Him, struck perhaps with penitence,—found, by His seeking them:—having come from the husks of a life of sin, to the bread of life;—so the three parables seem to imply.

πάντες, a general term, admitting of course of exceptions, see ch. Luke 13:33 and note.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 15:1". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-15.html. 1863-1878.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

Lu 15

Contents

The Lord is here teaching by Parables. Here are three contained in this Chapter; namely, the Lost Sheep, the Lost Piece of Money, and the Prodigal Son.

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Luke 15:1". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/luke-15.html. 1828.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 15:1. πάντες, all) Not merely very many; all who were in the place. [It is evident from this passage in what way the Saviour afforded to those who flocked together to Him, and joined themselves eagerly to Him, that very advantage, which He would have afforded to the people of Jerusalem, had they for their part been willing; namely, after the image of a hen, which protects and cherishes her young brood under her wings, so He cherished them.—Harm., p. 415.]

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 15:1". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-15.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

LUKE CHAPTER 15

Luke 15:1,2 The Pharisees murmur at Christ for receiving sinners.

Luke 15:3-7 The parable of the lost sheep,

Luke 15:8-10 and piece of silver,

Luke 15:11-32 and of the prodigal son.

Ver. 1,2. I have so often taken notice, that the term all in the New Testament is very often used to signify, not all the individuals of that species, or order of men, to which it is applied, but only a great and considerable number of them, that it is needless again to repeat it. None can imagine, that every individual publican and sinner in those parts, where Christ now was, came to hear Christ, but only many of them, or some of every sort. Thus publicans and harlots entered into the kingdom of God, while the children of the kingdom, and such as appeared to lie fairer for it, were cast out. The scribes, who were the interpreters of the law, and the Pharisees, who were the rigid observers of their decrees and interpretations, murmured, they were disturbed and troubled at it; thinking that because the law appointed no sacrifice for bold and presumptuous sinners, therefore there was no mercy in God for them, or those of whom they had such a notion, and that they were ipso jure excommunicated, and therefore Christ sinned in eating or drinking with them, or in any degree receiving of them; and from hence concluding he was no prophet: as if because ordinarily persons are known by their companions with whom they converse, therefore it had been a general rule; as if one might have concluded, that their doctorships were ignorant, because they conversed with them that were so, for their instruction; or could conclude, that the physician is sick, because his converse is with the sick, for their cure and healing. A man is not to be judged to be such as he converses with necessarily, or in order to their good, which was the end of all our Saviour’s converse with these sinners. Besides, were they themselves without sin? The root of their uncharitableness was their opinion of their own righteousness, from the works of the law, according to their own jejune interpretation of it. But let us hear our Saviour’s reply.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 15:1". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-15.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

мытари и грешники См. пояснения к 14:21; Мф. 5:46; 21:32. Несмотря на трудность восприятия проповедей Христа (14:25-35), изгои общества тянулись к Нему, в то время как иудейские вожди все более и более укреплялись в желании убить Его. Ср. 1 Кор. 1:26-29.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 15:1". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-15.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Publicans and sinners. Matthew 9:10.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 15:1". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-15.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘Now all the public servants and sinners were drawing near to him to hear him.’

Gathered in the crowds around Jesus were large numbers of public servants and ‘sinners’. The ‘public servants were those who served the Romans in one way or another, either under Herod or under Pilate, both of whom represented Rome. They would include a large number of tax and toll collectors, men, often brutal men, who had taken advantage of the system to enrich themselves, and they would be as unwelcome to the sinners as they were to the Pharisees. We must not just ignore the truth about them. The ‘sinners’ were those who did not in Pharisaic eyes sufficiently follow the laws of cleanness and uncleanness, the laws of tithing, and so on. They would include those guilty of all kinds of sins, some mild, others more serious. But all shared one common position. They were despised by the Pharisees. Yet their presence here indicated that in their hearts there was a desire for the truth, and a recognition that their present lives were unsatisfactory. Jesus welcomed them as those who were seeking to change, not as those who would stay as they were. And while to the Pharisees their presence was an offence, to Heaven it was a joy.

‘Were drawing near.’ The verb is used similarly of crowds in Matthew 15:8, and the tense probably indicates their continual drawing near over a period of time. It was during this period of regular association with the crowds that the Pharisees and Scribes began to mouth their criticisms.

‘To hear Him.’ This suggests a certain attentiveness about their listening, (compare Luke 14:35). They were listening, ‘the Pharisees and Scribes’ (for the order compare Luke 5:30; Mark 7:1; Mark 7:5; Matthew 15:1) were not. This idea of listening is important in Luke, see Luke 5:1; Luke 5:15; Luke 6:17; Luke 6:27; Luke 6:47; Luke 6:49; Luke 7:29; Luke 8:8-18; Luke 8:21; Luke 9:35; Luke 10:16; Luke 10:24; Luke 10:39; Luke 11:28; Luke 11:31. He wants us to know that it is important that we genuinely ‘hear’.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 15:1". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-15.html. 2013.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

The TRIAD OF PARABLES in, behalf of the Peraean Publicans and Sinners.

1.Then drew near—We suppose these transactions to have taken place in the Peraean ministry of our Lord, of which Bethabara was probably the rallying point. This, being near Jericho and the fords of the Jordan, with their custom-houses, many publicans and sinners would be in the neighborhood, to whom the preaching of our Lord presented powerful attractions. This section too was more plentifully stocked with aliens and Gentiles, who, mingling with the irreligious Jews, constituted in all probability the sinners here named in connection with the publicans. We therefore do not quite coincide with Stier and Alford, who understand Luke as merely affirming a general fact that publicans and sinners were in the habit in different places of attending the Lord’s ministry. On the contrary, we rather hold that the discourses of this entire chapter and the next took place on a very special day, namely, the closing day of his ministry in Peraea. See note on Luke 13:32. It forms, indeed, a key to the entire passage, Luke 15:1 to Luke 17:10, to note that among the Gentile and publican population in this region there was a general turning toward Christ, and that he is earnestly sustaining them against the cavils and sneers of the Pharisees. So also chapters 14 and Luke 18:9-14.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 15:1". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-15.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 15:1. To the disciples. To the body of the disciples, including the publicans for whom the parable had a special adaptation. That the Pharisees also heard what He said appears from Luke 15:14.

A certain rich man. This represents God, the Possessor of all things. To none other do men really stand in the relation of stewards. The only objection to this interpretation, arising in Luke 15:8, is answered by that verse itself, which indicates that the whole parable is borrowed from the actions of ‘the sons of this world,’ and only partially applicable to ‘the sons of the light’ The view that mammon is meant involves great difficulties. A reference to Satan is far fetched. Existing political circumstances may have suggested some points in the parable, but a direct application to these things is out of the question. (For example: some think the Romans are represented by the rich man, the publicans by his steward; others that the former represents the Emperor, the latter a governor like Pilate, etc.) Other views seem to imply that our Lord spoke the parable to puzzle His hearers.

A steward. Such stewards were often slaves, but this one was evidently free. He represents Christ’s disciples, but especially then the publicans, who, being in many cases rich, needed such instruction. (Zacchaeus may have heard of the lesson, see chap. Luke 19:8).

Was accused. The accusation was true (Luke 15:3), but probably malicious also.

As wasting his goods. He led a life of luxury on his lord’s means. In how many ways is this accusation true of Christ’s disciples!—The plain statement, that the property of the master was wasted, opposes the explanation that he had added a profit for himself to the rents, etc., of the tenants and debtors. According to this, the transaction in Luke 15:5-7 was simply an alteration to the fair rent. But this would be no real restitution. The view that mammon is the lord, involves, here the strange idea that this waste is equivalent to entering the service of Christ, since they could not ‘serve God and mammon.’ And so throughout the whole, this interpretation compels us to take the worst acts in the parable as representing the best in the application.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 15:1". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-15.html. 1879-90.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Luke 15:1. Then drew near unto him all the publicans and sinners — That is, some of all the different classes of publicans, or all those of that place, and some other notorious sinners; for to hear him — Being influenced to do so through the condescension and kindness which he manifested toward all descriptions of persons, the most abandoned not excepted. Some suppose they came by a particular appointment from all the neighbouring parts. But as Luke goes on in the story, without any intimation of a change, either in the time or the scene of it, it is most probable that these discourses were delivered the same day that Christ dined with the Pharisee, which, being the sabbath day, would give the publicans, who on other days were employed in their office, a more convenient opportunity of attending. And the Pharisees and scribes murmured, &c. — Thinking this behaviour of our Lord inconsistent with the sanctity of a prophet, they were much displeased with him for it, and murmured at that charitable condescension, which ought rather to have given them joy.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Luke 15:1". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/luke-15.html. 1857.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Then drew near = Then were drawing near.

all. Put by Figure of speech Synecdoche (of the Part), App-6, for a large number.

publicans = tax-gatherers.

for to hear = to hear.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 15:1". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-15.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Then drew near unto him all the publicans and sinners for to hear him.

Then - but when, is not stated and cannot be determined. See remarks prefixed to Luke 9:51.

Drew near, [ eesan (Greek #1510) de (Greek #1161) engizontes (Greek #1448)]. The phrase implies something habitual. See the note at the same imperfect tense in Luke 1:22, etc.

Unto him all the publicans and sinners for to hear him. Strange auditory for such a Preacher! In fact, among the marvels of this most marvelous History, none is more marvelous than the fact that the most sunken classes of society-we might almost say, its refuse and scum-seem, as by some spell, to have been attracted to the Holy, Harmless, Undefiled One, the Separate from sinners! What could the secret of this be? What but the discovery in Him of a compassion for their case against which they had found every other breast steeled. 'Abandoned of men, we had thought ourselves much more so of God: Heaven and earth seemed alike shut against us, and we were ready to conclude that, as outcasts from both, we must live on the wretched life we are living, and then lie down and die without hope. But compassion for the chief of sinners beams in that Eye, and streams forth from those Lips; God is in that Heart, Heaven in that Voice; Never man spake like this Man: As He speaks, God, Himself seems to draw near even to us, and say to us in accents of melting love, Return unto Me, and I will return unto you: Who and what He is, we are too ignorant to tell; but we feel what He is to us; when He is with us, we seem to be in the precincts of heaven.' How far these were the thoughts and feelings of that class would of course depend on the extent to which they were sick of their evil ways, and prepared to welcome divine encouragement to turn from them and live. But that what drew to Him "all the publicans and sinners for to hear Him" must have something of this nature-that of Him and Him alone, if we except His like-minded Forerunner, they saw clearly it could not be said, "No man careth for my soul" - will be evident from the sequel.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 15:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-15.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

1. One time many tax collectors and outcasts. These people came to Jesus in great numbers. Tax collector. They worked for the Roman Occupation Army, and were thought of as traitors to their fellow Jews. Most had been dishonest and made themselves rich. Outcasts. People who had been “suspended” and no longer allowed to be part of the synagogue.

 

 

 

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Bibliographical Information
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Luke 15:1". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/luke-15.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

XV.

(1) Then drew near unto him . . .—Better, and all the publicans and the sinners were drawing near to hear Him. There is not quite the same direct sequence in the Greek as in the English, but what follows comes naturally after the mention of the “multitudes” in Luke 14:25. Publicans and sinners knew that Jesus had turned, as in indignation, from the house of the Pharisee, and this, it may be, gave them courage to approach Him.

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 15:1". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-15.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Then drew near unto him all the publicans and sinners for to hear him.
5:29-32; 7:29; 13:30; Ezekiel 18:27; Matthew 9:10-13; 21:28-31; Romans 5:20; 1 Timothy 1:15
Reciprocal: Exodus 33:21 - place by;  Matthew 5:46 - publicans;  Matthew 9:9 - named;  Matthew 9:11 - Why;  Matthew 11:19 - a friend;  Matthew 18:17 - a publican;  Matthew 21:31 - the publicans;  Mark 2:15 - GeneralLuke 3:12 - GeneralLuke 5:30 - GeneralActs 2:38 - Repent;  James 1:19 - let;  1 Peter 4:18 - the sinner

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 15:1". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-15.html.