Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 21:28

But when these things begin to take place, straighten up and lift up your heads, because your redemption is drawing near."
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Earth;   Jesus, the Christ;   Jesus Continued;   Righteous;   Watchfulness;   The Topic Concordance - Coming of the Lord Jesus Christ;   End of the World;   Kingdom of God;   Redemption;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Head;   Jerusalem;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Day of the lord;   Redemption;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Paul the Apostle;   Redeem, Redemption;   War, Holy War;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Luke, Gospel of;   Salvation;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Kingdom of God;   Luke, Gospel According to;   Peter, Second Epistle of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Discourse;   Impossibility;   Luke, Gospel According to;   Redemption;   Redemption (2);   Salvation Save Saviour;   Supremacy;   1910 New Catholic Dictionary - parousia;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chief parables and miracles in the bible;   Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Head;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Lift;  

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And when these things begin to come to pass,.... When the first of these signs appears, or any one of them:

then look up and lift up your heads; be cheerful and pleasant; do not hang down your heads as bulrushes, but erect them, and put on a cheerful countenance, and look upwards, from whence your help comes; and look out wistfully and intently, for your salvation and deliverance:

for your redemption draweth nigh; not the redemption of their souls from sin, Satan, the law, the world, death, and hell; for that was to be obtained, and was obtained, before any of these signs took place; nor the redemption of their bodies at the last day, in the resurrection, called the day of redemption; for this respects something that was to be, in the present age and generation; see Luke 21:32 but the deliverance of the apostles and other Christians, from the persecutions of the Jews, which were very violent, and held till these times, and then they were freed from them: or by redemption is meant, the Redeemer, the son of man, who shall now come in power and glory, to destroy the Jews, and deliver his people; and so the Ethiopic version renders it, "for he draws nigh who shall save you".

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 21:28". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-21.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

redemption — from the oppression of ecclesiastical despotism and legal bondage by the total subversion of the Jewish state and the firm establishment of the evangelical kingdom (Luke 21:31). But the words are of far wider and more precious import. Matthew (Matthew 24:30) says, “And then shall appear the sign of the Son of man in heaven,” evidently something distinct from Himself, mentioned immediately after. What this was intended to mean, interpreters are not agreed. But as before Christ came to destroy Jerusalem, some appalling portents were seen in the air, so before His personal appearing it is likely that something analogous will be witnessed, though of what nature it is vain to conjecture.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 21:28". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-21.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Look up (ανακυπσατεanakupsate). First aorist active imperative of ανακυπτωanakuptō to raise up. Here of the soul as in John 8:7, John 8:10, but in Luke 13:11 of the body. These the only N.T. examples of this common verb.

Redemption (απολυτρωσιςapolutrōsis). Act of redeeming from απολυτροωapolutroō The final act at the second coming of Christ, a glorious hope.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 21:28". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-21.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Look up

See on Luke 13:11. Graphic, as implying being previously bowed down with sorrow.

Redemption ( ἀπολύτρωσις )

See on lettest depart, Luke 2:29.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 21:28". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-21.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And when these things begin to come to pass, then look up, and lift up your heads; for your redemption draweth nigh.

Now when these things — Mentioned Luke 21:8,10, etc., begin to come to pass, look up with firm faith, and lift up your heads with joy: for your redemption out of many troubles draweth nigh, by God's destroying your implacable enemies.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 21:28". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-21.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

But when these things begin to come to pass, look up, and lift up your heads; because your redemption draweth nigh1.

  1. But when these things begin to come to pass, look up, and lift up your heads; because your redemption draweth nigh. The preliminary death-throes of this present physical universe, which will strike terror to the souls of those who have limited themselves to material hopes, will be to the Christian a reassuring sign, since he looks for a new heaven and a new earth.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 21:28". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-21.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Scofield's Reference Notes

redemption

(See Scofield "Romans 3:24"), See Scofield "Romans 8:19", See Scofield "Romans 8:23"

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These files are considered public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available in the Online Bible Software Library.
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Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Luke 21:28". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/luke-21.html. 1917.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

REDEMPTION

‘And when these things begin to come to pass, then look up, and lift up your heads; for your redemption draweth nigh.’

Luke 21:28

Redemption dawns, as order out of chaos, and rides triumphant on the storm of a shattered world. Is not this the way of God? ‘He knoweth whereof we are made; He remembereth that we are but dust.’ The infinite pathos of life appeals irresistibly to His infinite pity. And they run ever side by side—wrath and redemption, punishment and pity, doom and restitution.

I. Redemption!Note the expression. It is a word with which we are familiar in the writings of St. Paul—as the paying of purchase-money to secure the captive’s liberty; and it emphasises the fact, which we are so apt to miss, that a purpose of God runs through all which seems to be most turbulent and irresponsible in the dealings of men. And, further, it declares to us that the help we look for is from above, that the life and death of Jesus Christ are not so many lessons on which the reformer may base his precepts, but the working out of a Divine purpose and the extension of Divine help to meet the sore needs of human trouble.

II. It may be true that anxious times are before us in Church and State, but if so there is redemption behind them.—There are anxious questions whichever way we turn, portents and signs of wickedness, of immorality, clever enough to steer clear of criminality, and more deadly because more clever; of heartless luxury, of indifference, of the shaking of great principles and the abandonment of fundamental beliefs. And yet here, too, there are signs of coming redemption, the timid leaves of better things are starting forth. It is an immense thing, for instance, to be able to feel that there is a real growth in sincerity. If there is far less official religion than there used to be, or a respectful conformity with despised traditions, there is an immense growth in earnestness. The man who belongs to no party may enjoy the cynical contempt of the gods of Olympus looking down on a struggle which they despise and avoid, but he will carry no weight nor get a hearing for his message. There is a bright side even to the restlessness which is such a characteristic of our times. Those of us who know least of the writings of St. Augustine know the famous passage in his Confessions where he says, ‘We were made, O Lord, for Thee, and our heart is restless until it rests in Thee.’

—Rev. Canon Newbolt.

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Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Luke 21:28". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/luke-21.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

28 And when these things begin to come to pass, then look up, and lift up your heads; for your redemption draweth nigh.

Ver. 28. Look up] You that shall then be found alive shall soon be caught up, 1 Thessalonians 4:14-18, and fully freed from all evils and enemies.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 21:28". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-21.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Luke 21:28. Then look up, "Look upwards, and lift up your heads with joy and assurance; for as soon as you see the first appearance of these sights, you may comfortably conclude that your redemption draweth nigh." As the resurrection is the time when we shall in fact be fully redeemed, or delivered from all the sad consequences of sin,—and therefore is called, The redemption of our bodies; (Romans 8:23 compare Hosea 13:14.) so, in a less proper sense, the deliverance from the toilsandsorrows,temptationsandinfirmitiesofthissinfuland calamitous life, may on the like principles be called redemption: and if we may judge of the length of the apostles' lives by the extent of their labours, though we know not thetime when many of them died, there is reasonto conjecture, that it was not till about this period; which, bythe way, would be an argument, that they were now most of them young men. The expression, Look up, in this verse, admirably suits the load of labour and sufferings, under which the apostles would be depressed in this afflicted state.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Luke 21:28". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/luke-21.html. 1801-1803.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

28.] ἀπολ., i.e. the completion of it by My appearing.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 21:28". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-21.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 21:28. ἀρχομένων, when these things are beginning) Comp. the expression, “the beginning,” in Matthew 24:8. For this reason refer these things to Luke 21:8-10, et seqq.: and in this passage He is treating of the preparation for nearer events; but ( δὲ) in Luke 21:34-35, He is treating of the preparation for the last events of all.— ἀνακύψατε καὶ ἐπάρατε, look up, and lift up your heads) in order that as soon as possible ye may perceive the event answering to your expectation, and may with joy embrace it (welcome it). Comp. ch. Luke 24:5 [Not as the disciples after the resurrection, who, with “faces bowed down to the earth,” “sought the living among the dead”]; Job 10:15 [If I be righteous, yet will I not lift up my head]. In the LXX. Version ἀνακύψαι is used to express, “to lift up the head;” also ἆραι κεφαλὴν, Judges 8:28.— ἀπολύτρωσις, deliverance [redemption) from many miseries, Luke 21:12; Luke 21:16-17. Deliverance from the miseries which befell the Jews. [So long, to wit, as the shadows of the Levitical law, along with the City and Temple, were standing, the kingdom of GOD, or the free exercise of the Christian religion, did not as yet enjoy unrestricted scope. This is compared to the loveliness of the summer, Luke 21:30-31 : but old things must first be taken away,—V. g.]

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 21:28". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-21.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Poole on "Luke 21:27"

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 21:28". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-21.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

поднимите головы ваши Ужасные скорби и знамения, которые характеризуют последние дни, для истинного верующего являются основанием для ожидания скорой радости и торжества.

избавление Т.е. окончательная полнота искупления, когда искупленные навечно воссоединятся со Христом.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 21:28". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-21.html.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

The Parable of the Fig-tree, Luke 21:28-33.

28.These things.—The these things of the apostles’ question, Matthew 24:3, namely, the destruction of the temple and city.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 21:28". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-21.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

“But when these things begin to come about, look up, and lift up your heads, because your redemption draws near.”

So the final consequence of the sufferings and tragedies of the ages will be the coming of Christ to receive His own, and to bring His final judgment on the world. And the result is that as we become aware of such things it should cause us to lift up our heads, recognising that our final redemption draws ever closer. While he suffers with those who suffer, the Christian is not surprised at what is coming on the world, indeed he expects it. Whether it be earthquake, volcanic eruption, hurricane, tsunami, human bombs or whatever, he sees it as a reminder of man’s sinfulness and judgment, and as God’s reminder that His Son will be coming ‘soon’, to take His own to be with Himself, and to bring on the world a judgment which in Scripture is constantly pictured in terms of all these tragedies, and much, much more.

‘Look up.’ The verb means to raise oneself from a stooping position, to stand upright, and therefore to look with confidence and elation. Out of the trial that will come on him the Christian continually looks up in order to visualise the One Who is coming. He is able to lift up his head because he looks to his coming deliverance by Him.

‘Your redemption.’ The final release from the bondage of sin and of the world, which has become a possibility because He gave His life a ransom for many (Mark 10:45), paying the price for sin (1 Corinthians 6:20; 1 Peter 1:18-19). See also Luke 22:37.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 21:28". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-21.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

These calamities should have the result that believers living then will realize that the Second Coming is very near. Consequently they should prepare to meet the Lord. The approach of their redemption refers to the approach of the final stage of their redemption, namely, their entering the safety of the kingdom (cf. Psalm 111:9; Isaiah 63:4; Daniel 4:34). When Jesus returns, He will remove believers from the Tribulation by ending it. This verse contains encouragement for believers. Lifting up the head is symbolic of hope and rejoicing (cf. Judges 8:28; Job 10:15; Psalm 24:7; Psalm 83:3).

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Luke 21:28". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/luke-21.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 21:28. But when these things, 1e,, those spoken of in Luke 21:25-26, since the coming of the Son of man (Luke 21:27) would be instantaneous.

Begin to come to pass. This suggests their continuance, but the close of the verse indicates a brief period.

Look up. The word means to raise one’s self from a stooping posture, and is here applied to those previously bowed under tribulations. The idea of joyful hope is of course implied, as in the other phrase: lift up your heads, which however suggests more strongly the idea of expectation.

Because your redemption (completed at and by Christ’s appearing) draweth nigh. The same events which terrified the world (Luke 21:25-26) are to awaken these feelings in Christians. This is to be our comfort also during the intervening period, if we are cast down by the prospect, or fact, of a general rejection of Christ.

Luke 21:29-33 are the same as in the parallel passages.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 21:28". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-21.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 21:28". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-21.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

look up. Greek. anakupto = watching with outstretched neck. Occurs only here, Luke 13:11, and John 8:7, John 8:10.

for = because.

redemption = deliverance from the tribulation. See Zechariah 14:1-4.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 21:28". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-21.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(28) Look up.—The Greek word, literally, bend up, or turn up, meets us here and in Luke 13:11, and nowhere else in the New Testament, except in the doubtful passage of John 8:7; John 8:10.

Redemption.—The word, familiar as it is to us, is, in the special form here used, another of those characteristic of St. Paul’s phraseology (Romans 3:24; Romans 8:23; 1 Corinthians 1:30; Ephesians 1:7, et al.). It occurs also in Hebrews 9:15; Hebrews 11:35. In its primary meaning here it points to the complete deliverance of the disciples from Jewish persecutions in Palestine that followed on the destruction of Jerusalem. The Church of Christ was then delivered from what had been its most formidable danger.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 21:28". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-21.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And when these things begin to come to pass, then look up, and lift up your heads; for your redemption draweth nigh.
look
Psalms 98:5-9; Isaiah 12:1-3; 25:8,9; 60:1,2
redemption
Romans 8:19,23; Ephesians 1:14; 4:30
Reciprocal: 2 Kings 15:37 - began;  Isaiah 35:4 - behold;  Jeremiah 51:46 - lest;  Matthew 16:28 - see;  Luke 21:7 - what;  Luke 21:9 - but;  Romans 13:11 - for now;  1 Thessalonians 4:18 - Wherefore

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 21:28". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-21.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Luke 21:28.And when these things begin to take place. Luke expresses more clearly the consolation by which Christ animates the minds of his followers; for, though this sentence contains nothing different from the words of Matthew, which we have just now explained, yet it shows better for what purpose the angels will come, as we are told, to gather the elect. For it was necessary to contrast the joy of the godly with the general sorrow and distress of the world, and to point out the difference between them and the reprobate, that they might not view with horror the coming of Christ. We know that Scripture, when it speaks not only of the last judgment, but of all the judgments which God executes every day, describes them in a variety of ways, according as the discourse is addressed to believers or to unbelievers.

To what purpose is the day of the Lord to you?
says the prophet Amos, (
Amos 5:18.)

It is a day of darkness and gloominess, (154) not of light; of sorrow, not of joy; of destruction, not of salvation. On the other hand, Zechariah (Zechariah 9:9) bids the daughter of Zion rejoice on account of thecoming of her King; and justly, for—as Isaiah (Isaiah 35:4) tells us—the same day which brings wrath and vengeance to the reprobate brings good-will and redemption to believers.

Christ therefore shows that, at his coming, the light of joy will arise on his disciples, that they may rejoice in the approaching salvation, while the wicked are overwhelmed with terror. Accordingly, Paul distinguishes them by this mark, that they wait for the day or coming of the Lord, (1 Corinthians 1:7) for that which is their crown, and perfect happiness, and solace, is delayed till that day, (2 Timothy 4:8.) It is therefore called here (as in Romans 8:23) redemption; because we shall then obtain truly and perfectly the consequences of the deliverance obtained through Christ. Let our ears therefore be awake to the sound of the angel’s trumpet, which will then sound, not only to strike the reprobate with the dread of death, but to arouse the elect to a second life; that is, to call to the enjoyment of life those whom the Lord now quickens by the voice of his Gospel; for it is a sign of infidelity, to be afraid when the Son of God comes in person for our salvation.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on Luke 21:28". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/luke-21.html. 1840-57.