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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 6:5

And He was saying to them, "The Son of Man is Lord of the Sabbath."

The Biblical Illustrator

Luke 6:5

That the Son of Man is Lord also of the Sabbath

A spiritual man Lord of the Sabbath

When is a son of man lord of the Sabbath-day?
To whom may the Sabbath safely become a shadow? I reply, he that has the mind of Christ may exercise discretionary lordship over the Sabbath-day. He who is in possession of the substance may let the shadow go. A man in health has done with the prescriptions of the physician. But for an unspiritual man to regulate his hours and amount of rest by his desires, is just as preposterous as for an unhealthy man to rule his appetites by his sensations. Win the mind of Christ--be like Him--and then in the reality of rest in God, the Sabbath form of rest will be superseded. Remain apart from Christ, and then you are under the law again--the fourth commandment is as necessary for you as it was for the Israelite; the prescriptive regimen which may discipline your soul to a sounder state. It is at his peril that the worldly man departs from the
rule of the day of rest. Nothing can make us free from the law but the Spirit. (F. W. Robertson, M. A.)

Jesus and the two ideals

I. THE TITLE HE GIVES HIMSELF. Son of Man. We find Him both humbled and exalted as the Son of Man. As the Son of Man He hath not where to lay His head; and as the Son of Man He claims authority to forgive sin, and is Lord even of the Sabbath-day. He applied this phrase to Himself in all the different aspects of His great life. In Him, as the Son of Man, humanity is again in its Sonship of God.

II. THE CLAIM HE MAKES ON HIS OWN BEHALF, as Lord even of the Sabbath-day. The perfection of God and the perfection of man, as depicted in the Bible, are two distinct, and, out of their own spheres, incompatible ideals. These two ideals seem to have met in the Christ. He is humble and self-assertive, receptive and full. Authority and obedience meet in Him and blend. (J. Ogrnore Davies.)

The Sabbath, a saving economy

Sunday is God’s special present to the working man; and one of its chief objects is to prolong his life, and to preserve efficient his working tone. In the vital system it acts like a compensation pond; it replenishes the spirits, the elasticity and vigour which the last six days have drained away, and supplies the force which is to fill the six days succeeding. In the economy of life it answers the same purpose as, in the economy of income, is answered by a savings-bank. The frugal man who puts asides a pound to-day, and another pound next month, and who, in a quiet way, is always putting by his stated pound from time to time, when he grows old and frail gets not only the same pounds back again, but a good many pounds besides. And the conscientious man who husbands one day of existence every week--who, instead of allowing the Sunday to be trampled and torn in the hurry and scramble of life, treasures it devoutly up--will find that the “ Lord of the Sabbath “ keeps it for him, and in length of days and a hale old age gives it back with usury. The savings-bank of human existence is the weekly Sunday. (North British Review.)


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Luke 6:5". The Biblical Illustrator. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/luke-6.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

And he said unto them, The Son of man is lord of the sabbath.

There were a number of arguments by which Jesus responded to the Pharisees' false charge.

(1) He showed the biased and unprincipled motives of those making the charge, as evidenced by their approval of a real violation on the part of David, and yet alleging against the Son of David a "violation" founded on their hair-splitting interpretations!

(2) He showed that "on the sabbath day the priests in the temple profane the sabbath, and are guiltless," and that "one greater than the temple" was among them (Matthew 12:5,6). Jesus, the true and greater temple, of which the old temple was merely a type, was being served by his disciples; and, even if their actions were illegal (although they were not) they would have been sanctified by the holy purpose of serving the greater temple. In the old temple, priests continually did things which were not allowed otherwise than in temple service.

(3) He showed that the spirit of the ancient law of God should have been heeded, not merely the letter of it. "If ye had known what this meaneth, I desire mercy, and not sacrifice, ye would not have condemned the guiltless" (Matthew 12:7). This quotation from Hosea 6:6 reveals that the Pharisees had failed to read their own scriptures. To make the conveyance of a spoonful of wheat to the mouth a violation of God's sabbath, as carrying a burden, was contrary to the spirit of God's law; and, if the Pharisees had heeded the spirit of it, they would not have condemned Jesus' innocent disciples.

(4) Jesus also taught that keeping the sabbath day "holy" was not intended to be fulfilled merely by what men did not do on that day, but by what they actually did. Jesus asked, "Is it lawful on the sabbath to do good, or to do harm? to save life, or destroy it?" (see under Luke 6:9).

(5) Jesus claimed absolute lordship of the sabbath, as in the verse before us.

In the Greek, "Lord" comes first in the sentence, and so is emphatic. He controls the sabbath instead of being controlled by it. In the Jewish mind, this was tantamount to claiming deity. Jesus did not in these words set aside the law. He interpreted it in its true meaning.[7]

The sabbath ordinance, rightly understood, was an expression of Jesus' own will; and, therefore, his expression of lordship over it was not in order to violate it, but to uplift it and free it from the folly of human abuse, and to restore it as a blessing to mankind. "The true sabbath rest," as Lamar said, "is found in him; it begins here in rest for the soul, and ends hereafter in the eternal rest."[8]

(6) "The sabbath was made for man and not man for the sabbath" (Mark 2:27). What is true of the sabbath is true of all of God's laws. They were not given to hinder and limit men, but to free and bless men. Jesus in this statement called attention to God's intention in the giving of his holy laws; and it is not a statement that men may do as they please with regard to God's laws, violating them when they wish to do so, on the grounds of "human need." A somewhat fuller treatment of this question has been offered here because, of all the passages in the New Testament, this has become the most popular in the theology of those who would reduce Christianity to a basic humanism, the major premise of which is this: "If human needs are restricted by God's law, it is God's law that should be set aside; and, of course, `human needs' refers actually to `human WANTS'!" This is the great error of our generation.

[7] Herschel H. Hobbs, op. cit., p. 111.

[8] J. S. Lamar, The New Testament Commentary (Cincinnati, Ohio: Chase and Hall, 1877), Vol. II, p. 103.


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 6:5". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-6.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And he said unto them,.... He adds this at the close of the instances he gave, at the end of his vindication of his disciples, and discourse with the Pharisees, as a full answer to their cavils;

that the son of man is Lord also of the sabbath; and may do what he will, and suffer his disciples to do whatever he pleases on that day; See Gill on Matthew 12:8.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 6:5". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-6.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Lord also — rather “even” (as in Matthew 12:8).

of the sabbath — as naked a claim to all the authority of Him who gave the law at Mount Sinai as could possibly be made; that is, “I have said enough to vindicate the men ye carp at on My account: but in this place is the Lord of the law, and they have His sanction.” (See Mark 2:28.)


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 6:5". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-6.html. 1871-8.

Vincent's Word Studies

Lord of the Sabbath

See on Matthew 12:6.

sa40


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The text of this work is public domain.

Bibliography
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 6:5". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-6.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

The Fourfold Gospel

And he said unto them, The Son of man is lord of the sabbath1.

  1. The Son of man is Lord of the sabbath. See .


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 6:5". "The Fourfold Gospel". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-6.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Is Lord also of the Sabbath; that is, as David, the anointed king of Israel, was Lord of the sacred preparations of the tabernacle.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Luke 6:5". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/luke-6.html. 1878.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

5 And he said unto them, That the Son of man is Lord also of the sabbath.

Ver. 5. See Matthew 12:3-4, Mark 2:24.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 6:5". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-6.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Luke 6:5. Lord also of the sabbath. Lord even, &c.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Luke 6:5". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/luke-6.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Poole on "Luke 6:1"


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 6:5". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-6.html. 1685.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

5. καὶ ἔλεγεν. Marking a weighty addition to the subject, see Luke 5:36. The following utterance is one of Christ’s great intimations of Christian freedom from mere legalism.

κύριοςκαὶ τοῦ σαββάτου. ‘Lord even of the Sabbath,’ though you regard the Sabbath as the most important command of the whole Law. In St Mark we have further, “the Sabbath was made for man, and not man for the Sabbath.”

This was one of no less than six great occasions on which the fury of the Pharisees had been excited by the open manner in which our Lord set aside as frivolous and unauthoritative the burdens which the Oral Law had attached to the Sabbath. The other instances are the healing of the cripple at Bethesda (John 5:1-16); the healing of the withered hand (Luke 6:1-11); of the blind man at Siloam (John 9:1-41); of the paralytic woman (Luke 13:14-17); and of the man with the dropsy (Luke 14:1-6). In laying His axe at the root of a proud and ignorant Sabbatarianism, He was laying His axe at the root of all that “miserable micrology” which they had been accustomed to take for religious life. They had turned the Sabbath from a holy delight into a revolting bondage. The Apocryphal Gospels are following a true tradition in the prominence which they give to Sabbath healing, as a charge against Him on His trial before the Sanhedrin.

In the famous Cambridge Manuscript (D), the Codex Bezae, there is here added the following passage: τῇ αὐτῇ ἡμέρᾳ θεασάμενός τινα ἐργαζόμενον τῷ σαββάτῳ εἶπεν αὐτῷ· ἄνθρωπε εἰ μὲν οἶδας τί ποιεῖς μακάριος εἶ· εἰ δὲ μὴ οἶδας ἐπικατάρατος καὶ παραβάτης εἶ τοῦ νόμου. “On the same day, observing one working on the Sabbath, He said to him O man, if indeed thou knowest what thou doest, thou art blessed: but if thou knowest not, thou art accursed, and a transgressor of the Law.” This very remarkable addition cannot be accepted as genuine on the authority of a single MS., and can only be regarded as one of the agrapha dogmata, or ‘unrecorded traditional sayings’ of our Lord. The meaning of the story is that ‘if thy work is of faith,—if thou art thoroughly persuaded in thy own mind—thou art acting with true insight; but if thy work is not of faith, it is sin.’ See Romans 14:22-23; 1 Corinthians 8:1. What renders the incident improbable is that no Jew would dare openly to violate the Law by working on the Sabbath, an act which rendered him legally liable to be stoned. The anecdote, as Grotius thought, may have been written in the margin by some follower of Marcion, who rejected the inspiration of the Old Testament.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
"Commentary on Luke 6:5". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/luke-6.html. 1896.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘And he said to them, “The Son of man is lord of the sabbath.” ’

And this was because as the Son of Man He was Lord of the Sabbath, that is, He was the overall authority who could make declarations of what was lawful to be done on the Sabbath Day. It was basically a claim to be the heaven appointed and heaven enthroned Messiah, thus setting Him up before God as having a higher authority than the Scribes, the Jewish teachers and arbiters of the Law.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 6:5". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-6.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Jesus" second point was that the Son of Man (cf. Luke 5:24), because of who He Isaiah , has the right to violate the Sabbath. Jesus was not violating the Sabbath by doing what He did, but He had the right to do so. This was another claim to divine authority, an emphasis that we have seen running through this part of Luke"s Gospel. God is greater than the laws He has imposed, and He can change them when He chooses to do so.

"David did not allow cultic regulations to stand in the way of fulfilling his divine calling of becoming king of Israel. Jesus has a similar mission which makes him "Lord of the Sabbath," one who is authorized to decide when Sabbath regulations must be set aside to fulfill a greater divine purpose." [Note: Tannehill, 1:174-75.]

This incident elevates the readers" appreciation of Jesus" authority to new heights in Luke.


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These files are public domain.
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Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Luke 6:5". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/luke-6.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 6:5. In one of the old manuscripts, this verse is placed after Luke 6:10, and instead of it here words to this effect: ‘Observing on the same day one laboring on the Sabbath, He said to him: if thou knowest what thou doest, thou art blessed; if thou knowest not, thou art cursed and a transgressor of the law.’ But it is improbable that any one would have been thus laboring, or that our Lord would thus create needless opposition and misunderstanding.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 6:5". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-6.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 6:5. καὶ ἔλεγεν: in Lk. this important logion about the Son of Man’s Lordship over the Sabbath is simply an external annex to what goes before = and He said: instead of arising out of and crowning the argument, as in Mt., and partly in Mk., though the latter uses the same phrase in introducing the logion peculiar to him about the Sabbath being made for man. If Lk. had Mk. before him, how could he omit so important a word? Perhaps because it involved a controversial antithesis not easily intelligible to Gentiles, and because the Lordship of the Son of Man covered all in his view. How did he and his readers understand that Lordship?


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 6:5". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-6.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

the Son of man. See App-98.

also of the sabbath = of the sabbath also.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 6:5". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-6.html. 1909-1922.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And he said unto them, That the Son of man is Lord also of the sabbath.
Matthew 11:5-8; Mark 2:27; 9:7; Revelation 1:10

Copyright Statement
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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 6:5". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-6.html.


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Wednesday, November 21st, 2018
the Week of Proper 28 / Ordinary 33
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