Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Revelation 15:3

And they *sang the song of Moses, the bond-servant of God, and the song of the Lamb, saying, "Great and marvelous are Your works, O Lord God, the Almighty; Righteous and true are Your ways, King of the nations!
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - God;   God Continued...;   Jesus Continued;   Lamb of God;   Meteorology and Celestial Phenomena;   Music;   Praise;   Song;   Truth;   Thompson Chain Reference - Divine;   God's;   Hymns;   Justice;   Justice-Injustice;   King;   Kingship, Divine;   Lamb of God;   Lamb, Christ the;   Music;   Names;   New;   Saviour, Christ Our;   Sin-Saviour;   Singing;   Song, New;   Songs;   Sovereignty of God;   Sufferings of Christ;   Titles and Names;   Victory;   Ways;   Wonderful;   Works;   Works of God;   The Topic Concordance - God;   Government;   Greatness;   Justice;   Servants;   Truth;   Ways;   Wrath;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Christ, the King;   Titles and Names of Christ;   Truth of God, the;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Exodus;   Justice;   King;   Quotations;   Singing;   Type, typology;   Way;   Work;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - King, Christ as;   Servant, Service;   Time;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Jesus Christ;   Order;   Wisdom of God;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Songs;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Isaiah;   Moses;   Revelation of John, the;   Wilderness of the Wanderings;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Revelation, the Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Moses;   World;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Angels (2);   Doxology ;   God;   Hymn;   Justice (2);   King;   Minister Ministry;   Moses ;   Numbers;   Praise (2);   Righteous, Righteousness;   Righteousness;   Type;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - God;   Hymns;   Lamb;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Names titles and offices of christ;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Age;   Glass, Sea of;   King, Christ as;   Marvel;   Moses;   Moses, Song of;   Omnipotence;   Persecution;   Praise;   Print;   Retribution;   Revelation of John:;   Spiritual Songs;   Truth;   Worship;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Emet We-Yaẓ;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for December 14;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

They sing the song of Moses - That which Moses sang, Exodus 15:1, when he and the Israelites, by the miraculous power of God, had got safely through the Red Sea, and saw their enemies all destroyed.

And the song of the Lamb - The same song adapted to the state of the suffering, but now delivered Christians.

Great and marvellous are thy works - God's works are descriptive of his infinite power and wisdom.

Lord God Almighty - Nearly the same as Jehovah, God of hosts.

Just and true are thy ways - Every step God takes in grace or providence is according to justice, and he carefully accomplishes all his threatenings and all his promises; to this he is bound by his truth.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Revelation 15:3". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/revelation-15.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And they sing the song of Moses the servant of God - A song of thanksgiving and praise, such as Moses taught the Hebrew people to sing after their deliverance from Egyptian bondage. See Revelation 5:9-10, Revelation 5:12-13.

Saying, Great and marvelous are thy works - See the notes on Revelation 15:1. The meaning is, that great power was evinced in redeeming them; and that the interposition of the divine goodness in doing it was marvelous, or was such as to excite wonder and admiration.

Lord God Almighty - This would seem to mean the same thing as the expression so common in the Old Testament, “Yahweh, God of hosts.” The union of these appellations give solemnity and impressiveness to the ascription of praise, for it brings into view the fact, that he whose praise is celebrated is Lord - Yahweh - -the uncreated and eternal One; that he is God the creator, upholder, and sovereign of all things; and that he is Almighty - having all power in all worlds. All these names and attributes are suggested when we think of redemption; for all the perfections of a glorious God are suggested in the redemption of the soul from death. It is the Lord the Ruler of all worlds; it is God - the Maker of the race, and the Father of the race, who performs the work of redemption; and it is a work which could be accomplished only by one who is Almighty.

Just and true - The attributes of justice and truth are brought prominently into view also in the redemption of man. The fact that God is just, and that in all this work he has been careful to maintain his justice Romans 3:26; and the fact that he is true to himself, true to the creation, true to the fulfillment of all his promises, are prominent in this work, and it is proper that these attributes should be celebrated in the songs of praise in heaven.

Are thy ways - Thy ways or dealings with us, and with the enemies of the church. That is, all the acts or “ways” of God in the redemption of his people had been characterized by justice and truth.

Thou King of saints - King of those who are holy; of all who are redeemed and sanctified. The more approved reading here, however, is “King of nations” - ὁ βασιλεὺς τῶν ἐθνῶν ho basileus tōn ethnōn- instead of “King of saints” - τὼν ἁγιῶν tōn hagiōnSo it is read in the critical editions of Griesbach, Tittmann, and Hahn. The sense is not materially affected by the difference in the reading.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Revelation 15:3". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/revelation-15.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And they sing the song of Moses the servant of God, and the song of the Lamb, saying, Great and marvelous are thy works, O Lord God, the Almighty; righteous and true are thy ways, thou King of the ages.

And they sing the song of Moses ... and ... the Lamb ... Morris said of this, "They sing (presumably to their own harp accompaniment)."[26] At least, Morris named such a conclusion what it is; namely, a presumption, a presumption which we do not allow for a moment as in any sense valid. The notion of literal harps is simply not in this passage. The text says "they sing."

Of Moses and of the Lamb ... Perhaps no more is meant by this than the unity of the saints of both the Old Testament and the New Testament. Moses was the grand Old Testament type of Christ. See extensive development of this in my Commentary on Hebrews, pp. 67-69. The song is that of redemption.

Great and marvelous are thy works, O Lord God, the Almighty ... Significantly, this song, made up of a blended collection of Old Testament texts, deals not with the overcoming of the saints, but with the mighty works of God. "There is not a single word about their own achievement."[27] Self is at last forgotten; selfishness is finally destroyed. In heaven, the song of Moses and the Lamb is exclusively an anthem of loving praise to the Almighty.

The Almighty ... "This title, which is ascribed to God nine times in Revelation, is found but once elsewhere in the New Testament (2 Corinthians 6:18)."[28]

Thou King of the ages ... The KJV has "King of the saints," and the ASV margin has "King of the nations." The passage is true, however it may be rendered.

[26] Leon Morris, op. cit., p. 188.

[27] William Barclay, The Revelation of John (Philadelphia: The Westminster Press, 1976), p. 120.

[28] Robert H. Mounce, Commentary on the New Testament, Revelation (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1977), p. 288.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Revelation 15:3". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/revelation-15.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And they sing the song of Moses the servant of God,.... Not that in Deuteronomy 32:1 but that in Exodus 15:1 and the sense is, either that they observed the law of Moses, which he as a servant in the Lord's house faithfully delivered, and kept it distinct from the Gospel, and did not blend them together, as in the times before; or rather, that they sung a song like that of Moses, and on a like occasion. Pharaoh was the very picture of the pope of Rome; his oppression and cruel usage of the Israelites represent the tyranny and cruelty of the Romish antichrist; and the deliverance of Israel out of Egypt, and the destruction of the Egyptians at the Red sea, which occasioned the song of Moses, were an emblem of God's bringing his people out of antichristian bondage, and of the ruin of antichrist, upon which this song is sung; and Rome, in this book, is called Egypt, Revelation 11:8. The Jews have a notion, that the very song of Moses itself will be sung in the world to come, in the days of the Messiah; for they say, there are in it the times of the Messiah, and of Gog and Magog, and of the resurrection of the dead, and the world to comeF12Zohar in Exod. fol. 23. 2. & 24. 3, 4. & 25. 2. & T. Bab. Sanhedrin, fol. 91. 2. . And this song was sung by the Levites in the daily serviceF13Maimon. Tamidim, c. 6. sect. 9. .

And the song of the Lamb; the Lamb of God, who was slain for the sins of men; the same song of which mention is made, Revelation 5:9 the song of redeeming love, a song of praise for the blessings of grace which come through him, and of deliverance by him:

saying, great and marvellous are thy works, Lord God Almighty; Christ is in this song addressed as a divine person, as Lord of all, God over all, blessed for ever, the Almighty God, as his works declare him to be; his works of creation, providence, and redemption, which are all great and marvellous, particularly the accomplishment of the glorious things spoken of his church, and the destruction of his enemies, which are here designed:

just and true are thy ways, thou King of saints: made so by his Father, and acknowledged by all his people, and especially at this time, when his kingdom will more visibly and gloriously appear: the Alexandrian copy, one of Stephens's, the Complutensian edition, and Arabic version, read, King of nations, as in Jeremiah 10:7 from whence this, and the beginning of the next verse, seem to be taken; the Vulgate Latin and Syriac versions read, "King of ages", an everlasting King, as in Jeremiah 10:10 but the generality of copies read as we have it: and the ways of this King are just and true; his purposes, decrees, and counsels of old, are faithfulness and truth; all his proceedings towards his own people, his subjects, are mercy and truth; his precepts and ordinances, his worship and service, are just and true, in opposition to every false way; and all his judgments upon his enemies, which are intended, are just, being what their sins deserved, and are true, being agreeably to his word and threatenings.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Gill, John. "Commentary on Revelation 15:3". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/revelation-15.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And they sing 7 the song of Moses the a servant of God, and the song of the Lamb, saying, 8 Great and marvellous [are] thy works, Lord God Almighty; just and true [are] thy b ways, thou King of saints.

(7) That song of triumph, which is (Exodus 15:2).

(a) So is Moses called for honour's sake, as it is set forth in (Deuteronomy 34:10). {(8)} This song has two parts: one a confession, both particular, in this verse, and general, in the beginning of the next verse (Revelation 15:4), another, a narration of causes belonging to the confession, of which one kind is eternal in itself, and most present to the godly, in that God is both holy and alone God: another kind is future and to come, in that the elect taken out of the Gentiles (that is, out of the wicked ones and unbelieving: as in (Revelation 11:2) were to be brought to the same state of happiness, by the magnificence of the judgment of God, in (Revelation 15:4).

(b) Thy doings.

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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Revelation 15:3". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/revelation-15.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

and  …  the Lamb — The New Testament song of the Lamb (that is, the song which the Lamb shall lead, as being “the Captain of our salvation,” just as Moses was leader of the Israelites, the song in which those who conquer through Him [Romans 8:37 ] shall join, Revelation 12:11) is the antitype to the triumphant Old Testament song of Moses and the Israelites at the Red Sea (Exodus 15:1-21). The Churches of the Old and New Testament are essentially one in their conflicts and triumphs. The two appear joined in this phrase, as they are in the twenty-four elders. Similarly, Isaiah 12:1-6 foretells the song of the redeemed (Israel foremost) after the second antitypical exodus and deliverance at the Egyptian Sea. The passage through the Red Sea under the pillar of cloud was Israel‘s baptism, to which the believer‘s baptism in trials corresponds. The elect after their trials (especially those arising from the beast) shall be taken up before the vials of wrath be poured on the beast and his kingdom. So Noah and his family were taken out of the doomed world before the deluge; Lot was taken out of Sodom before its destruction; the Christians escaped by a special interposition of Providence to Pella before the destruction of Jerusalem. As the pillar of cloud and fire interposed between Israel and the Egyptian foe, so that Israel was safely landed on the opposite shore before the Egyptians were destroyed; so the Lord, coming with clouds and in flaming fire, shall first catch up His elect people “in the clouds to meet Him in the air,” and then shall with fire destroy the enemy. The Lamb leads the song in honor of the Father amidst the great congregation. This is the “new song” mentioned in Revelation 14:3. The singing victors are the 144,000 of Israel, “the first-fruits,” and the general “harvest” of the Gentiles.

servant of God — (Exodus 14:31; Numbers 12:7; Joshua 22:5). The Lamb is more: He is the SON.

Great and marvelous are thy works, etc. — part of Moses‘ last song (Deuteronomy 32:3, Deuteronomy 32:4). The vindication of the justice of God that so He may be glorified is the grand end of God‘s dealings. Hence His servants again and again dwell upon this in their praises (Revelation 16:7; Revelation 19:2; Proverbs 16:4; Jeremiah 10:10; Daniel 4:37). Especially at the judgment (Psalm 50:1-6; Psalm 145:17).

saints — There is no manuscript authority for this. A, B, Coptic, and Cyprian read, “of the NATIONS.” C reads “of the ages,” and so Vulgate and Syriac. The point at issue in the Lord‘s controversy with the earth is, whether He, or Satan‘s minion, the beast, is “the King of the nations”; here at the eve of the judgments descending on the kingdom of the beast, the transfigured saints hail Him as “the King of the nations” (Ezekiel 21:27).

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 15:3". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/revelation-15.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

The song of Moses (την ωιδην του Μωυσεωςtēn ōidēn tou Mōuseōs). Exodus 14:31; 15:1-19. A song of victory like that of Moses after crossing the Red Sea.

And the song of the Lamb (την ωιδην του αρνιουtēn ōidēn tou arniou). A separate note of victory like that of Moses, though one song, not two. Charles finds it impossible to reconcile the two expressions, if genuine, but it is a needless objection. The words come from the O.T.: “great” (μεγαλαmegala) from Psalm 111:2, “wonderful” (ταυμασταthaumasta) from Psalm 139:14, “O Lord God the Almighty” (Κυριε ο τεος ο παντοκρατωρKurie ho theos ho pantokratōr) from Amos 4:13 (Revelation 4:8), “righteous and true” (δικαιαι και αλητιναιdikaiai kai alēthinai) from Deuteronomy 32:4, “Thou King of the ages” (ο βασιλευς των αιωνωνho basileus tōn aiōnōn) like Jeremiah 10:10; 1 Timothy 1:17. Some MSS. have “the king of the saints” and some “the king of the nations,” like Jeremiah 10:7. John thus combines in Hebraic tone the expressions of the old and the new in the song to the Glorified Messiah.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Revelation 15:3". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/revelation-15.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

The song of Moses

See Deuteronomy 32; to which some refer this allusion.

The servant of God

See Exodus href="/desk/?q=ex+14:31&sr=1">Exodus 14:31; Numbers 12:7; Psalm 105:26; Hebrews 3:5.

The song of the Lamb

There are not two distinct songs. The song of Moses is the song of the Lamb. The Old and the New Testament churches are one.

Great and marvellous are Thy works

Psalm 111:2; Psalm 139:14; 1 Chronicles 16:9.

Just and true are Thy ways

Rev., righteous for just. See Deuteronomy 32:4.

King of saints ( βασιλεὺς τῶν ἁγίων )

The readings differ. Some read for saints, ἐθνῶν ofthe nations; others αἰώνων ofthe ages. So Rev. Compare Jeremiah 10:7.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 15:3". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/revelation-15.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And they sing the song of Moses the servant of God, and the song of the Lamb, saying, Great and marvellous are thy works, Lord God Almighty; just and true are thy ways, thou King of saints.

And they sing the song of Moses — So called, partly from its near agreement,with the words of that song which he sung after passing the Red Sea, Exodus 15:11, and of that which he taught the children of Israel a little before his death, Deuteronomy 32:3,4. But chiefly because Moses was the minister and representative of the Jewish church, as Christ is of the church universal. Therefore it is also termed the sons of the Lamb. It consists of six parts, which answer each other: - 1.Great and wonderful are thy2.For thou only art gracious. works, Lord God Almighty3.Just and true are thy ways, O4.For all the nations shall come King of the nations. and worship before thee5.Who would not fear thee, O6.For thy judgments are made Lord, and glorify thy name? manifest. We know and acknowledge that all thy works in and toward all the creatures are great and wonderful; that thy ways with all the children of men, good and evil, are just and true.

For thou only art gracious — And this grace is the spring of all those wonderful works, even of his destroying the enemies of his people. Accordingly in Psalm 136:1-26., that clause, "For his mercy endureth for ever," is subjoined to the thanksgiving for his works of vengeance as well as for his delivering the righteous.

For all the nations shall come and worship before thee — They shall serve thee as their king with joyful reverence. This is a glorious testimony of the future conversion of all the heathens. The Christians are now a little flock: they who do not worship God, an immense multitude. But all the nations shall come, from all parts of the earth, to worship him and glorify his name. For thy judgments are made manifest - And then the inhabitants of the earth will at length learn to fear him.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Revelation 15:3". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/revelation-15.html. 1765.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

The song of Moses; a song expressive of the same sentiments with those of the song which Moses sung after his deliverance from the Egyptians. (Exodus 15:1-19.)

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Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Revelation 15:3". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/revelation-15.html. 1878.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

THE CHURCH TRIUMPHANT

‘And they sing the song of Moses the servant of God, and the song of the Lamb, saying, Great and marvellous are Thy works, Lord God Almighty; just and true are Thy ways, thou King of saints.’

Revelation 15:3

I. The Church Triumphant.—When the song of the triumphant Church is called ‘the song of Moses the servant of God’ the reference is to the Church of the Israelites and their leaders when Pharaoh and His hosts had been buried in the waters. The song was not only of thanksgiving to the Lord, but exultation over the wicked, rejoicing in their destruction. ‘The song of the Lamb’ is a song of which even now we can strike some notes. It may be considered as that ‘new song’ the burden of which is the ‘worthiness’ of the Redeemer. The ‘thousand times ten thousand of thousands’ which are ‘round about the throne’ were heard by St. John saying with a loud voice, ‘Worthy is the Lamb that was slain to receive power, and riches, and wisdom, and strength, and honour, and glory, and blessing.’

II. The Song.—‘Great and marvellous are Thy works, Lord God Almighty; just and true are Thy ways, Thou King of saints.’ It celebrates the greatness of the plan of God as displayed in the occurrences of the Judgment Day.

(a) It will bea great and marvellous work’ when the ‘tares shall have been separated from the wheat,’ all unrighteousness detected and exposed, the wicked banished and the faithful exalted.

(b) The Church affirms God’swaysto bejust and true,’ as well as His ‘works great and marvellous’; and this is a most important assertion when considered as called forth by the transactions of the judgment. The judgment will include in its searchings and sentences the heathen world as well as the Christian—men who have had none but the scantiest portion of revelation and those who have been blessed with its fulness.

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Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Revelation 15:3". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/revelation-15.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

3 And they sing the song of Moses the servant of God, and the song of the Lamb, saying, Great and marvellous are thy works, Lord God Almighty; just and true are thy ways, thou King of saints.

Ver. 3. And they sing] There cannot but be music in the temple of the Holy Ghost.

The song of Moses] As being delivered out of spiritual Egypt.

And the song of the Lamb] That mentioned Revelation 14:3, and the same in effect with that of St Paul, 1 Timothy 1:15; 1 Timothy 1:17.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Revelation 15:3". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/revelation-15.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Revelation 15:3

The Song of the Triumphant Church.

Our text suggests two topics of discourse; for it gives what may be called a definition of the song which the triumphant Church sings, and it then furnishes the words of which that song is composed. We have, therefore, in the first place, to examine the language by which the song is described: "the song of Moses the servant of God, and the song of the Lamb"; we have then, in the second place, to consider the language employed: "Great and marvellous are Thy works, Lord God Almighty; just and true are Thy ways, thou King of saints."

I. Now it admits of no dispute that when the song of the triumphant Church is called "the song of Moses the servant of God" the reference is to the Church of the Israelites and their leaders when Pharaoh and his hosts had been buried in the waters. And it is very observable, and in some respects almost mysterious, that it should be this "song of Moses" to which glorified saints still strike their harps. The song was not only of thanksgiving to the Lord, but exultation over the wicked, rejoicing in their destruction. The song of the triumphant Church is described not only as "the song of Moses," but as that also of "the Lamb." "They sing the song of Moses the servant of God, and of the Lamb." Now we may be said to feel more at home with "the song of the Lamb" than with that of Moses, for this is a song of which even now we can strike some notes; whereas we look on that of Moses with a kind of awe and dread, as though it were not suited to such minstrelsy as ours. "The song of the Lamb," which the Evangelist heard, may be considered as that "new song" which is given in other parts of the book of Revelation, the burden of which is the "worthiness" of the Redeemer. The "thousand times ten thousand of thousands" which are "round about the throne" were heard by St. John saying with a loud voice, "Worthy is the Lamb that was slain to receive power, and riches, and wisdom, and strength, and honour, and glory, and blessing." There is something similar to this in the strain which mingles with that of lofty exultation as the Church beholds her overthrown enemies. And if, therefore, "the song of Moses" be one which shows such subjugation or refinement of human feeling as is almost unintelligible, at least "the song of the Lamb" is in thorough harmony with what is now felt and chanted by believers; it is the song of grateful confession that we owe everything to the Redeemer, and that His blood and righteousness have been the alone procuring cause of our deliverance from ruin and our title to immortality.

II. "Great and marvellous are Thy works, Lord God Almighty; just and true are Thy ways, thou King of saints." Such is a portion of the lofty anthem. Taking this anthem in its largest application, we may say that it celebrates the greatness of the plan of God as displayed in the occurrences of the judgment-day. And it is well worthy our attention that these two characteristics should be finally declared to distinguish the whole business of the judgment. It will be "a great and marvellous work" when the "tares shall have been separated from the wheat," all unrighteousness detected and exposed, the wicked banished and the faithful exalted. And this is not the whole of the chorus. The Church affirms God's "ways" to be "just and true," as well as His "works great and marvellous"; and this is a most important assertion when considered as called forth by the transactions of the judgment. The judgment will include in its searchings and sentences the heathen world as well as the Christian—men who have had none but the scantiest portion of revelation and those who have been blessed with its fulness. And even in a Christian community there is the widest difference between the means and opportunities afforded to different men; some being only just within sound of the Gospel, whilst others are continually placed within sound of its messages. All this seems to invest with great difficulty the business of the judgment. It shows that there must be various standards: one standard for the heathen and another for the Christian; one for this heathen or this Christian and another for that. And there is something overwhelming in the thought that the untold millions of the human population will undergo an individual scrutiny; that they will come man by man to the bar of their Judge, each to be tried by his own privileges and powers. We can hardly put from us the feeling that in so enormous an assize there will be cases comparatively overlooked, in which due allowance will not be made, or in which sentence will not be founded on a full estimate of the circumstances. But whatever our doubts and suspicions beforehand, "just and true are Thy ways, thou King of saints," is the confession, which will follow the judgment. It is a confession, we are bound to say, in which the lost will join with the redeemed. The feeling of every condemned man shall be that, had there been none but himself to be tried, his case could not have received a more patient attention or a more equitable decision. The praise which is chanted on the glassy and fiery sea tells us that God will be justified when He speaketh, and clear when He judgeth.

H. Melvill, Penny Pulpit, No. 1656.

References: Revelation 15:3.—Spurgeon, Sermons, vol. iii., No. 136; Homilist, 3rd series, vol. iv., p. 20; H. Wonnacott, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xiv., p. 186.

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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Revelation 15:3". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/revelation-15.html.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Revelation 15:3. (174) βασιλεὺς τῶν ἐθνῶν, King of nations) An august and befitting title: comp. Revelation 15:4, and Jeremiah 10:7; and yet it has been variously changed by the copyists.(175)

(174) τὴν ᾠδὴν τοῦ ἀρνίου, the song of the Lamb) The Lamb sings that song in honour of His Father in the great congregation; Psalms 22:23-26.—V. g.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Revelation 15:3". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/revelation-15.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

And they sing the song of Moses the servant of God; the song which Moses sang upon God’s delivery of the Israelites from the danger of Pharaoh, which we have, Exodus 15:1-27; not that they sang those words, but to the same sense.

And the song of the Lamb; a song to the honour of Christ, to the same sense that Moses sang, and upon a much like occasion.

Saying, Great and marvellous are thy works, Lord God Almighty; admiring the greatness and marvellousness of what God had done in their deliverance, and giving him the glory of his Almighty power.

Just and true are thy ways, thou King of saints; acknowledging, that all the acts of his providence were both just, God in them giving to every one their due, and true, God by them but justifying his promises and threatenings. These words are taken out of Psalms 145:17.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Revelation 15:3". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/revelation-15.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

песнь Моисея Песнь, которую пели израильтяне сразу после перехода через Чермное море и избавления от египетской конницы (Исх. 15:1-21; ср. Втор. 32:1-43). Это была песня победы и освобождения, которую с радостью будут петь искупленные, победившие антихриста и его систему.

песнь Агнца См. 5:8-14. Эти две песни прославляют два великих события спасения: 1) освобождение Богом Израиля из Египта через Моисея и 2) освобождение Богом грешников от греха через Христа.

велики и чудны дела Твои Это предложение из песни Агнца превозносит великие дела Божьи по созданию вселенной и по сохранению ее таким чудесным образом (ср. Пс. 138:14).

Вседержитель! Бог всесилен (ср. Ам. 4:13).

Царь святых! Бог – владыка над всеми спасенными из каждой нации (ср. Иер. 10:7).

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Revelation 15:3". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/revelation-15.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

The song of Moses-and-of the Lamb; praising and adoring God for his deliverance of his people from Egyptian bondage by Moses, and from the bondage of sin by Christ, and for his victories over all their foes.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Revelation 15:3". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/revelation-15.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Foy E. Wallace's Commentary on the Book of Revelation

(2) The song of Moses and the Lamb--15:3-4.

1. Great and marvellous are thy works, Lord God Almighty; just and true are thy ways, thou King of saints --15:3. The song of Moses had long been incorporated in the temple services, which the temple worshippers sang in choruses. This visional victory song of the saints, as previously stated, was patterned after the Old Testament exodus song of Moses, led by Miriam; but here the phrase and the Lamb was added--the song of Moses and the Lamb.

The rhetoric of the song enhances the supreme excellence and glory of the object of its praise--the Lord God Almighty, and the Lamb of God. The comparison of the irreverent familiarity of present times in addressing God, as if He were on equality with man is an inadvertent profanation. The eulogies of the song are sublime, as should be all prayer to God. The supreme title Lord God Almighty expressed omnipotence; the tribute great and marvellous was exclamatory of matchless majesty; the attributes just and true, were the acknowledgment of submission to His righteous judgment; the coronation name, thou King of saints, included the saints of all ages, hence has been variously translated thou King of the ages; and it ascribed to Him eternal existence and the Sovereign of all saints, through whose power they were freed from the dominion of the imperial beast.

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Wallace, Foy E. "Commentary on Revelation 15:3". "Foy E. Wallace's Commentary on the Book of Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/foy/revelation-15.html. 1966.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

These martyrs sang two Song of Solomon, as seems clear from the repetition of the words "the song." Moses recorded two songs in praise of God"s faithfulness and deliverance of the Israelites. Of these the one in Exodus 15 seems slightly more appropriate for these martyrs to echo than the one in Deuteronomy 32because it is a song of victory. Nevertheless they both contain similar emphases. The song of the Lamb seems to be a song not recorded elsewhere in Scripture, though some commentators have suggested several different Psalm. Probably this song follows in Revelation 15:3-4. In the case of both Song of Solomon, the genitive "of" is probably subjective: Moses and the Lamb were responsible for these Song of Solomon, not the subjects of them.

"Moses celebrated a deliverance by the Lord which adumbrated a greater deliverance to come. The greater redemption eclipsed the former by a similar degree as the second redeemer transcended the first. Moses and the Lamb are no more to be bracketed than the promised land of Israel is to be equated with the kingdom of God. The unity of God"s purpose and the continuity of God"s people under both covenants include a disjunction of his action in Christ and of his people"s experience of redemption." [Note: Beasley-Murray, p235.]

The first part of this song extols God"s works and ways. Specifically, God"s works in judging His enemies are in view. His might makes judgment possible. His ways of judging are just and faithful. His sovereignty makes His judgment necessary and certain.

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 15:3". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/revelation-15.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Revelation 15:3. Not only do they harp: they mingle song with their harping.

They sing the song of Moses the servant of God and the song of the Lamb, saying. The epithet ‘servant of God’ applied to Moses awakens the remembrance of all that God did for Israel through Moses the great representative of the Old Testament Dispensation. The Lamb is not less clearly the sun and centre of the New Testament Dispensation. Or the matter may be otherwise looked at. Moses delivered men from the first head of the beast, i.e under him began that deliverance out of a persecuting world which is finished in Christ. The song, therefore, includes everything that God had done for His people alike in Old and New Testament times. How clearly does it appear that the beast cannot be Nero! Only one generation, not the whole Church, could sing of deliverance from him. There is nothing to indicate that the song is similar to that of Israel at the Red Sea, Exodus 15, or to that of Deuteronomy 22, yet in all probability the former was in the Seer’s view.

In the words of the song it seems only necessary to notice that for the reading ‘king of saints’ of the Authorised Version king of the nations is to be substituted. The change is important, as throwing light upon that aspect of the Almighty which is here thought of. Not His love towards His ‘saints,’ but His terror towards His enemies is celebrated. He beautifies His people with salvation, but He visits the ‘nations’ with His wrath. Revelation 15:4. In this verse the song begun in Revelation 15:3 is continued in the following words, Who shall not fear, O Lord, and glorify thy name, for thou only art holy? for all the nations shall come and worship before thee, for thy righteous acts have been made manifest. The ‘righteous acts’ of God referred to are not such as have been exhibited alike in the publication of His Gospel and in the destruction of His enemies. The whole context imperatively requires that we shall understand them of the latter alone. If so, we are guided to the true meaning of the word ‘worship’ in this verse, and we have at the same time a striking illustration of the manner in which, throughout the Apocalypse (and the Fourth Gospel), we meet with a double marvelling and a double worship, that of faith upon the one hand, and of fear upon the other. It may be at once allowed that there is no passage in the Apocalypse which seems to speak so strongly of the conversion of the world as that now before us. Yet there is a ‘worship’ of awe, of terror, and of trembling, as well as a ‘worship ‘of faith and love; and the whole analogy of this book (as well as of the Fourth Gospel, which in this respect most strikingly resembles it) leads directly to the conclusion, that the former alone is spoken of when the worship of the ungodly is referred to. So in Philippians 2:10 ‘things under the earth’ bow the knee and confess that Jesus is Lord. However, therefore, we may be at times disposed to think that mention is made in this book of the conversion of the wicked, it will we believe always appear upon more attentive consideration that nothing of the kind is really spoken of. Yet we are not on this account to conclude that the Apocalypse dooms to everlasting ruin all but the selected number who constitute in its pages the true Church of Christ. Its language appears only to be founded on that style of thought which meets us in the Old Testament when the Prophets speak of the enemies of Israel. Israel shall conquer and overthrow, but not necessarily destroy, them. Through their very subjugation they may receive a blessing. Thus may it be in the case before us. All that we urge is, that in the words of this verse judgment alone is in view. If judgment lead to penitence it is well; but the eye of the Seer does not travel so far into the future.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Revelation 15:3". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/revelation-15.html. 1879-90.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

And singing. This sea of glass and fire may also represent the sea which Moses passed in leaving Egypt; and the memory of this famous event, in every respect so similar to the deliverance of the saints from the persecutions to which they had been exposed during their lives, affords them the opportunity of singing the canticle of Moses, at the conclusion of which, they join in the praises of the Almighty for their own particular deliverance. (Calmet) --- O King of ages. In the common Greek is now read, O king of saints. (Witham)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Revelation 15:3". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/revelation-15.html. 1859.

Gary Hampton Commentary on Selected Books

They use what God has given them to sing a song of victory and praise. The song of Moses was sung to rejoice over Israel"s deliverance from the Egyptians through the Red Sea. Pharaoh"s army had been drowned in the sea and God would bring his people to their promised inheritance. (Exodus 15:1-21) The song of the Lamb would be one of triumph in salvation and over all the evil Satan and his forces had brought against them. Since both songs are sung, it may be these are the redeemed of both covenants. Appropriately, God is given all the praise for the victory. A better rendering at the end of this verse would either make God king of ages or nations, as in the margin.

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Hampton, Gary. "Commentary on Revelation 15:3". "Gary Hampton Commentary on Selected Books". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ghc/revelation-15.html. 2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

song of Moses. See Exodus 15:1-19. Deuteronomy 32:1-43.

song. Greek. ode. See Revelation 5:9.

servant. App-190.

and the song, &c. Two songs are specified in this verse In connection with this "song of the Lamb" compare Psalms 86:9-12. Isaiah 66:15, Isaiah 66:16, Isaiah 66:23. Zephaniah 2:11. Zechariah 14:16, Zechariah 14:17, &c. "Great . . . made manifest "(verses: Revelation 3:4). These are the words of the song of the Lamb; distinct from, but the complement of, the song of Moses.

LORD = O LORD.

Almighty = the Almighty. App-98.

just. App-191.

true. App-175. See p. 1511.

saints. The texts read "nations".

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Revelation 15:3". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/revelation-15.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And they sing the song of Moses the servant of God, and the song of the Lamb, saying, Great and marvellous are thy works, Lord God Almighty; just and true are thy ways, thou King of saints.

The song of Moses ... and ... the Lamb. The New Testament song which the Lamb shall lead, "the Captain of our salvation" (as Moses was leader of Israel), and in which those who conquer through Him (Romans 8:37) join (Revelation 12:11), is antitype to the triumphant Old Testament song of Moses and Israel at the Red Sea, (Ex

15.) The Old and New Testament churches are essentially one in conflicts and triumphs. The two appear joined in this phrase, as in the "twenty-four elders." Isaiah 12:1-6 foretells the song of the redeemed (Israel foremost) after the antitypical exodus and deliverance at the Egyptian sea. The passage through the Red Sea under the pillar of cloud was Israel's baptism, to which the believer's baptism in trials corresponds (1 Corinthians 10:1). The elect after their trials (especially those from the beast) shall be taken up before the vials of wrath be poured on the breast and his kingdom. So Noah and his family were taken out of the doomed world before the deluge; Lot out of Sodom before its destruction; the Christians escaped by a special interposition of Providence to Pella, before the destruction of Jerusalem. As the pillar of cloud and fire interposed between Israel and the Egyptian foe, so that Israel safely landed on the opposite shore before the Egyptians were destroyed, so the Lord, coming with clouds and in flaming fire, shall first catch up His elect people "in the clouds to meet Him an the air," then shall with fire destroy the enemy. The Lamb leads the song in honour of the Father amidst the great congregation (Psalms 22:25). This is the "new song," Revelation 14:3. The singular victors are the 144,000 of Israel, "the first-fruits," and the "harvest" of the Gentiles.

Servant of God - (Exodus 14:31; Numbers 12:7.) The Lamb is more: He is the SON (Hebrews 3:5-6).

Great and marvelous are thy works ... Part of Moses' last song. God's vindication of His justice, that He may be glorified, is His grand end. Hence, His servants again and again dwell upon this (Revelation 14:7; Revelation 19:2; Proverbs 16:4; Jeremiah 10:10; Daniel 4:37). Especially at the judgment (Psalms 1:1-6; Psalms 145:17).

Saints. A B, Coptic, Cyprian, read, 'of the NATIONS' 'Aleph (') C, 'of the ages;' so Vulgate and Syriac. The point at issue in the Lord's controversy with the earth is, whether He, or Satan's minion, the beast, is 'King of the nations;' here, at the eve of judgments descending on the kingdom of the beast, the transfigured saints hail Him as 'King of the nations' (Ezekiel 21:27).

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 15:3". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/revelation-15.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(3) And they sing the song of Moses the servant of God, and the song of the Lamb.—They join their voices to the music of their harps. The song of Moses was a pæan of victory over Pharaoh and his hosts (Exodus 14:26-31; Exodus 15:1-21). Israel stood on the margin of the Red Sea and saw the tokens of the overthrow of the great world-power of that day; so these saints stand by the border of the fire-blent sea of glass, and sing the song of triumph over the doom of the great world-powers of every age. The cases are parallel, the songs are alike; and it would not be out of place were the words of that other song of Moses, the man of God, to be heard from those who are made glad according to the days of their affliction, and who are clothed with the beauty of the Lord their God (Psalms 90:1; Psalms 90:15; Psalms 90:17). They also sing the song of the Lamb. The Apocalypse is full of Christ; the Lamb is the axis on which the world of its scenery moves; He is the key of earth’s history; the victory of the saints is in Him (Revelation 12:11); their song of triumph is of Him who put a new song in their mouth and in whom all things are reconciled (Ephesians 1:10; Philippians 2:10-11).

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Revelation 15:3". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/revelation-15.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And they sing the song of Moses the servant of God, and the song of the Lamb, saying, Great and marvellous are thy works, Lord God Almighty; just and true are thy ways, thou King of saints.
sing the song
Exodus 15:1-18; Deuteronomy 31:30; 32:1-43
the servant
Deuteronomy 34:5; 1 Chronicles 6:49; 2 Chronicles 24:6; Nehemiah 9:14; Daniel 6:20; 9:11; John 1:17; Hebrews 3:5
and the song
5:9-13; 7:10,11; 14:3,8
Great
Exodus 15:11; Job 5:9; Deuteronomy 32:4; Psalms 78:12; 105:5; 111:2; 118:22,23; 139:14; Psalms 145:6; Daniel 4:2,3
Lord God Almighty
4:8; 11:17; Genesis 17:1
just
16:5-7; 19:2; Deuteronomy 32:4; Psalms 85:10,11; 99:4; 100:5; 145:17; Isaiah 45:21; Hosea 14:9; Micah 7:20; Zephaniah 3:5
thou
Isaiah 9:6,7; 32:1,2; 33:22; Zechariah 9:9
saints
or, nations. or, ages.
17:14; 19:16
Reciprocal: Exodus 15:2 - song;  Exodus 15:21 - Sing ye;  Judges 5:1 - Sang Deborah;  2 Samuel 22:31 - his way;  1 Chronicles 16:25 - great;  Job 8:3 - Almighty;  Job 13:11 - Shall;  Job 36:3 - ascribe;  Job 37:5 - great;  Psalm 9:1 - show;  Psalm 17:7 - Show;  Psalm 18:30 - his way;  Psalm 19:9 - judgments;  Psalm 21:13 - so will;  Psalm 22:6 - a reproach;  Psalm 27:6 - I will;  Psalm 28:7 - with;  Psalm 32:7 - songs;  Psalm 33:5 - He;  Psalm 34:9 - fear;  Psalm 46:10 - I will be;  Psalm 48:1 - greatly;  Psalm 51:4 - when;  Psalm 57:11 - GeneralPsalm 65:5 - righteousness;  Psalm 66:6 - there;  Psalm 68:25 - the players;  Psalm 77:14 - the God;  Psalm 89:7 - GeneralPsalm 89:14 - Justice;  Psalm 92:5 - O Lord;  Psalm 94:15 - But;  Psalm 95:1 - sing;  Psalm 98:1 - for he;  Psalm 99:3 - for it;  Psalm 101:1 - I will sing;  Psalm 105:2 - Sing unto;  Psalm 107:31 - his wonderful;  Psalm 111:7 - works;  Psalm 111:8 - are done;  Psalm 119:27 - so shall I talk;  Psalm 119:137 - GeneralPsalm 136:4 - who alone;  Psalm 145:3 - Great;  Psalm 145:7 - sing;  Psalm 147:5 - Great;  Psalm 150:2 - for his mighty;  Isaiah 2:10 - for fear;  Isaiah 5:16 - God that is holy;  Isaiah 6:3 - Holy;  Isaiah 12:1 - O Lord;  Isaiah 12:5 - Sing;  Isaiah 24:16 - glory;  Isaiah 25:1 - thou hast;  Isaiah 30:29 - Ye shall;  Isaiah 49:26 - and all;  Lamentations 1:18 - Lord;  Ezekiel 38:23 - and I;  Daniel 4:37 - all;  Luke 7:29 - justified;  Luke 13:9 - if not;  John 1:29 - Behold;  John 12:13 - the King;  Acts 7:35 - a ruler;  Acts 26:22 - the prophets;  Romans 2:2 - judgment;  Romans 3:5 - Is God;  Romans 3:26 - that he;  Romans 9:14 - Is there unrighteousness;  1 Corinthians 10:1 - and all;  1 Corinthians 15:57 - giveth;  Colossians 3:16 - and spiritual;  1 John 1:9 - just;  1 John 5:20 - him that;  Revelation 3:7 - he that is true;  Revelation 6:10 - holy;  Revelation 12:11 - the blood;  Revelation 16:7 - Even;  Revelation 19:11 - and in;  Revelation 21:22 - the Lord

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Revelation 15:3". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/revelation-15.html.

Walter Scott's Commentary on Revelation

THE SONG.

Revelation 15:3. — "They sing the song of Moses, bondman of God, and the song of the Lamb." The songs are united. The song of Moses celebrates Jehovah's mighty deliverance of His people, His acts of power, and His ways of grace with and for Israel from the beginning of their history till their final triumph. Grace and glory are celebrated in the magnificent song sung on the eastern bank of the Red Sea (Exodus 15:1-27) — pre-eminently the song of Moses.{*The prophetic song of Moses (Deuteronomy 31:30; Deuteronomy 32:1-52), when a hundred and twenty years old, cannot be entitled to the appellation, "The Song of Moses." That the song of Exodus, and not the Deuteronomy one, is meant seems evident from the following considerations: The apocalyptic reference to the victors on the sea on which they stand; their conscious triumph over their enemy; the term "plague" common to the Mosaic and apocalyptic judgments on Egypt and on the Beast, as also the character of the plagues alike in both. These and other considerations which might be adduced prove conclusively that "The Song of Moses" is that of Exodus 15:1-27, and not the subsequent one on the eve of his death.} But it was an earthly redemption, and won with power over the might of the enemy. The song of the Lamb intimates two main subjects: first, redemption from guilt and sin's consequences by the blood of God's Lamb; and, second, the exaltation of the Lamb to which this book bears ample testimony.

The song of the martyred victors, the harp singers of Revelation 14:2-3, the brethren of the spared Jewish remnant on mount Zion (Revelation 14:1), is not so elevated nor characterised by such depth as that sung by the elders (Revelation 5:1-14). The worship of the latter is more profound, yet both companies are partakers of the heavenly calling.{*"Their song is very peculiar. The song of Moses is triumph over the power of evil by God's judgments. The song of the Lamb is the exaltation of the rejected Messiah, of the suffering One, and like Whom they had suffered; for it is the slain remnant amidst unfaithful and apostate Israel whom we find here. The song celebrates God and the Lamb, but by victorious sufferers who belong to Heaven." — "Synopsis of the Books of the Bible," in loco.}

THE SUBJECTS OF THE SONG.

3. — "Great and wonderful (are) Thy works, Lord God Almighty; righteous and true (are) Thy ways, O King of nations." The opening words of the song, "Great and wonderful," occur also in verse 1. The connection, of course, is different, but one cannot overlook the recurrence of the phrase in a scene admittedly closing up the manifested wrath of God upon public evil. The sign of closing judgment is "great and wonderful" (v. 1), so also are the works of God (v. 3). The time of the pouring out of the Bowls of wrath will be brief, but acts of stupendous and wonderful power will characterise it.

It will be observed that the works are ascribed to JEHOVAH, the Self-Existing, Sovereign, Independent One; ELOHIM, the Creator, the God of gods; and SHADDAI, Almighty in power, Almighty in resources, Almighty to sustain. As Jehovah He was known to Israel (Exodus 6:2-3). As God He stands related to creation (Genesis 1:1-31). As the Almighty He revealed Himself to the patriarchs (Genesis 17:1). The order in which the divine names and titles are here employed differs from that of their revelation. God, Jehovah,{*"By My Name JEHOVAH was I not known to them," i.e., Israel (Exodus 6:3), means that it was not known as a title of ordinary relationship. To Israel, of course, the name was familiar, but not known formally in special relation to them as a people.} and the Almighty is the historical order. But the true, real Israel is before God in the victorious company on the sea of glass, and thus the representatives of the nation use the appropriate divine title first. How true God is to His own Word and Name! Jehovah from the early days of Exodus 6:1-30 still stands related to Israel. Jehovah and Israel! Ah, then the people can never perish; never cease to be remembered. What a tower of strength in the combination of these divine titles! How consoling in their application to believers in all ages! How awful to contemplate their exercise to the enemies of God and of His saints!

But the ways of God also form part of the song. His tenderness, His grace, His love, His wisdom, and every gracious, moral feature manifested in His dealings with His saints pass before the victors in review. The holiness and pity of God to His saints form a tale that never can be fully told. The conspicuous acts of Jehovah were displayed before the eyes of Israel. These acts of power did not call for an intimate knowledge of Jehovah's character; they were self-evident to all. But the ways of God — those dealings flowing from what He is — could alone be discerned by the spiritual, hence we read, "He made known His ways unto Moses, His acts unto the children of Israel" (Psalms 103:7). His ways here, however, are ways of judgment, and that judgment, however variously expressed, is "righteous and true." The ways of God in His dealings with His people are ever just and true, but equally so in the chastisement of His enemies; this latter is specially in view in the passage before us.

3. — "O King of nations." In the text of the Authorised Version we have saints instead of nations; the latter, however, is inserted in the margin. Without doubt, the correct reading, on competent authority, should be nations, not saints. Christ is King of kings, King of the earth, King of Israel, King of the nations, but is never spoken of as "Our King," and never as the King of saints. Believers in the present dispensation have kingly rule and authority conferred upon them (1 Corinthians 4:8; 1 Corinthians 6:2-3; Revelation 1:6); its exercise is yet future. We shall reign with Christ (2 Timothy 2:12). The nations comprising the Roman earth are about to come under judgment, hence the appropriateness of the title "King of nations" (see Jeremiah 10:7). We gather that in this song of praise both God and Christ are worshipped, the former in the greatness of His Being, but in relation to Israel, and the latter in His ways of judgment with the Gentiles or nations.

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Scott, Walter. "Commentary on Revelation 15:3". "Walter Scott's Commentary on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sor/revelation-15.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

The song of Moses and of the Lamb was especially appropriate. It is to be associated with the four and twenty elders who have been mentioned a number of times. Twelve of them represent the Mosaic system and twelve stand for that under Christ. The song John heard these happy per-sons singing Was about the lawgivers of those great institutions. But while the subject matter of the song was concerning them as the lawgivers, they ascribed the credit to works of God because they are marvelous, and to Christ as a King who is true and just in his ways.

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Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on Revelation 15:3". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/revelation-15.html. 1952.

Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation

Revelation 15:3

Revelation 15:3 And they sing the song of Moses the servant of God, and the song of the Lamb, saying, Great and marvellous are thy works, Lord God Almighty; just and true are thy ways, thou King of saints.

Moses's song for God's deliverance of his Israel out of the Egyptian bondage is recorded. { Exodus 15:1-19}

The song of the Lamb;

that Isaiah, to the Lord Jesus Christ, the Lamb of God, and the Son of God, is here expressed,

Saying, great and marvellous are thy works, Lord God Almighty.

Thy works, that Isaiah, that righteous judgement upon mystical Babylon, the beast, the false prophet and whore.

Just and true are thy ways, thou King of Saints;

that Isaiah, all the ways of God's divine providence in preserving his churches of saints, his faithful ministers, and his suffering people; and also in delivering them out of the tyranny of the Roman papal kingdom of the anti-Christian beast, were and are just and true; that Isaiah, righteous, and according to the holy scripture of truth.

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Knollys, Hanserd. "Commentary on Revelation 15:3". "Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hkc/revelation-15.html.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

3.Song of Moses—Sung on the sea after a similar escape.

Of the Lamb—The same song elevated to a higher triumph. It is a song not only of triumph but of judgment; once over Egypt, now over Babylon, finally over the world.

Saying—The import of the twofold song is now given. It is a chant of adoration to God for his wonderful judgments on the organic wickedness of the profane world.

Works—Of just overthrow by him whose name is majestically expanded to its trinal form.

King of saints— Better reading, of ages; and perhaps still better, of nations. It then alludes to the profane nations typified by Babylon, and bound to be overthrown.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Revelation 15:3". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/revelation-15.html. 1874-1909.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Revelation 15:3. As in Exodus 14-15. Moses leads Israel in a song of praise to God over the dead Egyptians, so, after Rome’s downfall (Revelation 14:8 f., Revelation 15:2) the faithful are led by their captain (Revelation 12:11, Revelation 14:1; Revelation 14:4, cf.Hebrews 2:12), in a chant of triumph and gratitude. (Note the lack of any reference to their own sufferings. Their interest is in the great work of God.) For messiah as a second Moses in Jewish tradition, cf. Gfrörer, ii. 328 f. The song on the Red Sea had already been adapted to the worship of the Therapeutae (Philo, de uit. contempl. § xi.)— . . There is a continuity in redemption, which unites the first deliverance to the final. True to his cardinal idea of the identity of God’s people (Christians being the real Israel, cf. on Revelation 1:6), the prophet hails Jesus as the Christian Moses who, at the cost of his life, is commissioned by God to deliver the new Israel from their bondage to an earthly monarchy. The lyric with its Hebrew parallelisms is a Vorspiel of the succeeding judgments; it resembles (cf.E.Bi. 4954) the benediction after the Shema of Judaism (“a new song did they sing to Thy name, they that were delivered, by the seashore; together did all praise and own Thee as King, saying, ‘Yahveh shall reign world without end’ ”), and is almost entirely composed of O.T. phrases. Adoration is its theme, stirred by the sense of God’s justice. Similarly the famous hymn to Shamash, the Assyrian god of justice, which represents one of the highest reaches in ancient religious literature (Jastrow, pp. 300, 301): “Eternally just in the heavens are thou, / Of faithful judgment towards all the world art thou.” Most editors take the phrase . . . as a gloss; but if the song has nothing to do with the Lamb, it is as silent on Moses. Since the whole section comes from the pen of the general author, and since the collocation of the two (equivalent of course to a single hymn) is awkward mainly in appearance, while the omission of the Lamb’s Song would leave the section incomplete, it seems better to regard it as original rather than as a scribe’s addition like Revelation 14:10, etc. As in Revelation 14:1; Revelation 14:3, the Lamb is among his followers, yet not of them.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Revelation 15:3". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/revelation-15.html. 1897-1910.