Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Revelation 15:4

"Who will not fear, O Lord, and glorify Your name? For You alone are holy; For all the nations will come and worship before You , For Your righteous acts have been revealed ."
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Church;   Gentiles;   Glorifying God;   God Continued...;   Meteorology and Celestial Phenomena;   Praise;   Song;   Worship;   Thompson Chain Reference - Conversion;   Gentiles;   Glorifying God;   God;   God's;   Holiness;   Missions, World-Wide;   Universal;   Worship;   Worship, True and False;   The Topic Concordance - God;   Holiness;   Judges;   Manifestation;   Worship;   Wrath;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Fear, Godly;   Glorifying God;   Holiness of God, the;   Trinity, the;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Exodus;   God;   Singing;   Type, typology;   Work;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Jesus Christ;   Order;   Wisdom of God;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Holiness;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Gentiles;   Revelation, the Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Fear;   Holiness;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Day of Christ;   God;   Holiness Purity;   Ordinance;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Saint;   9 Holy Pious;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Glass, Sea of;   Moses, Song of;   Print;   Retribution;   Revelation of John:;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for July 19;   Every Day Light - Devotion for April 19;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Who shall not fear thee - That is, All should fear and worship this true God, because he is just and true and holy; and his saints should love and obey him, because he is their King; and they and all men should acknowledge his judgments, because they are made manifest.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Revelation 15:4". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/revelation-15.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Who shall not fear thee, O Lord - Reverence and adore thee; for the word “fear,” in the Scriptures, is commonly used in this sense when applied to God. The sense here is, that the judgments about to be inflicted on the beast and his image should and would teach people to reverence and adore God. There is, perhaps, included here also the idea of awe, inasmuch as this would be the effect of punishment.

And glorify thy name - Honor thee - the name being put for the person who bare it. The sense is, that, as a consequence of these judgments, men would be brought to honor God, and to acknowledge him as the Ruler of the earth.

For thou only art holy - That is, in these judgments he would show himself to be a holy God; a God hating sin, and loving righteousness and truth. When it is said that he “only” is holy, the expression is used, of course, in a comparative sense. He is so pure that it may be said that, in comparison with him, no one else is holy. Compare the notes on Job 4:18; Job 15:15.

For all nations shall come and worship before thee - That is, as the result of these punishments inflicted on this dread anti-Christian power, they shalt come and worship thee. Everywhere in the New Testament the destruction of that power is connected with the promise of the speedy conversion of the world.

For thy judgments are made manifest - To wit, on the beast. That formidable power is overthrown, and the grand hindrance to the universal spread of the true religion is now taken away. Compare the notes on Isaiah 26:9.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Revelation 15:4". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/revelation-15.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

Who shall not fear, O Lord, and glorify thy name? for thou only art holy; for all the nations shall come and worship before thee; for thy righteous acts have been made manifest.

Who shall not fear the Lord ...? This is a rhetorical question meaning that all people shall indeed fear and honor God.

All nations shall come and worship thee ... Rist criticized this passage as being, "out of harmony with the belief expressed throughout Revelation that the nations shall stubbornly refuse to repent."[29] Such a criticism does not properly construe the meaning. It is everywhere taught in the prophecy that "an innumerable company" will be saved (Revelation 7:9) from "every tribe and tongue and nation and people." It is that company who are meant here. They are the true nations who shall come and worship before the Lord. When God is through with this world, all that remains of it will glorify God. "The Apocalyptist thus declares the absolutely universal recognition of God in the End."[30] "The teaching of the Scriptures is that in the end the whole universe will acknowledge the righteousness of all God's acts and verdicts."[31]

[29] Martin Rist, The Interpreter's Bible, Vol. XII (New York-Nashville: Abingdon Press, 1957), p. 479.

[30] Isbon T. Beckwith, op. cit., p. 675.

[31] R. C. H. Lenski, op. cit., p. 459.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Revelation 15:4". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/revelation-15.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Who shall not fear thee, O Lord,.... At this time the people of the Jews shall seek after Christ, and fear him and his goodness; the forces of the Gentiles shall be brought into Zion, whose heart shall then fear, and be enlarged; the fear of the Lord will be in all places, and in all men, both Jews and Gentiles, Hosea 3:5

and glorify thy name? by ascribing all divine perfections to him, giving him divine worship and adoration, and attributing the whole of salvation to him, and the glory of all that is done for his church, and against its enemies:

for thou only art holy; not only perfectly holy, as man, but infinitely and essentially holy, as God, and the fountain of holiness to his people, as Mediator: this character seems to be given in opposition to antichrist, who arrogantly assumes the title of holiness to himself, when it only belongs to Christ.

For all nations shall come and worship before thee; the Gospel shall now be preached to all nations, and the earth shall be filled with the knowledge of it; the kingdoms of this world will become Christ's, and his kingdom shall be to the ends of the earth, and all people shall obey him: the words seem to be taken, with some other phrases before used, out of Psalm 86:8

for thy judgments are made manifest; or "thy justifications", or "righteousnesses"; the perfect righteousness of Christ, and the doctrine of justification by it, will now be most clearly revealed, and generally received, in opposition to the Popish doctrine of merits, works of supererogation, &c. or the judgments of the King of saints upon antichrist, who will now avenge their blood, which he has shed; see Revelation 17:1 and the justice and righteousness of his proceedings against the man of sin will be notorious and manifest to all, and be acknowledged, as in Revelation 16:5.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Revelation 15:4". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/revelation-15.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Who shall notGreek, “Who is there but must fear Thee?” Compare Moses‘ song, Exodus 15:14-16, on the fear which God‘s judgments strike into the foe.

thee — so Syriac. But A, B, C, Vulgate, and Cyprian reject “thee.”

all nations shall come — alluding to Psalm 22:27-31; compare Isaiah 66:23; Jeremiah 16:19. The conversion of all nations, therefore, shall be when Christ shall come, and not till then; and the first moving cause will be Christ‘s manifested judgments preparing all hearts for receiving Christ‘s mercy. He shall effect by His presence what we have in vain tried to effect in His absence. The present preaching of the Gospel is gathering out the elect remnant; meanwhile “the mystery of iniquity” is at work, and will at last come to its crisis; then shall judgment descend on the apostates at the harvest-end of this age (Greek, Matthew 13:39, Matthew 13:40) when the tares shall be cleared out of the earth, which thenceforward becomes Messiah‘s kingdom. The confederacy of ‹the apostates against Christ becomes, when overthrown with fearful judgments, the very means in God‘s overruling providence of preparing the nations not joined in the Antichristian league to submit themselves to Him.

judgmentsGreek, “righteousnesses.”

are — literally, “were”: the prophetical past for the immediate future.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 15:4". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/revelation-15.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Who shall not fear? (τις ου μη ποβητηιtis ou mē phobēthēi̱). Rhetorical question with ου μηou mē (double negative) and first aorist passive subjunctive of ποβεομαιphobeomai future passive in Jeremiah 10:7).

And glorify (και δοχασειkai doxasei). Change here to the future indicative instead of the aorist subjunctive, as often. Cf. Psalm 86:9.

Thou only art holy (μονος οσιοςmonos hosios). Both predicate adjectives, “Thou art alone holy.” God alone is perfectly holy (Revelation 16:5).

Shall come (ηχουσινhēxousin). Future active of ηκωhēkō worship (και προσκυνησουσινkai proskunēsousin). Future active of προσκυνεωproskuneō Both from Psalm 86:9.

Have been made manifest (επανερωτησανephanerōthēsan). Prophetic first aorist passive indicative of πανεροωphaneroō This martyr‘s song has the ring of great poetry.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Revelation 15:4". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/revelation-15.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Who shall not fear Thee?

See Jeremiah 10:7. Omit thee.

Holy ( ὅσιος )

See on Luke 1:75. The term is applied to Christ in Acts 2:27, Acts 2:35; Hebrews 7:26. To God only here and Revelation 16:5, where the correct reading is ὁ ὅσιος thouholy one, instead of ὁ ἐσόμενος whichshalt be.

All nations shall come

Compare Psalm 86:9; Isaiah 2:2-4; Isaiah 66:23; Micah 4:2.

Judgments ( δικαιώματα )

Not merely divine decisions, but righteous acts generally. So Rev. Primarily, the word signifies that which has been deemed right so as to have the force of law. Hence an ordinance (Luke 1:6; Hebrews 9:1; Romans 1:32). A judicial decision for or against (Romans 5:16). A righteous deed. See Revelation 19:8.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 15:4". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/revelation-15.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

4 Who shall not fear thee, O Lord, and glorify thy name? for thou only art holy: for all nations shall come and worship before thee; for thy judgments are made manifest.

Ver. 4. Who shall not fear thee] q.d. How mad are the enemies, how sottish is the world that fear not thee who art the proper object of fear! Psalms 76:11. The Greeks call him θεος, just as δεος, fear; the Chaldee Dechilah for the same reason; and Jacob styled him "The fear of his father Isaac."

For thou only art holy] Before it had been said of his Holiness, Who is like unto the beast Now, Who shall not fear thee, O Lord? for thou only art holy.

For all nations shall come] As being deeply affected with thy heaviest plagues upon Antichrist; they shall better bethink themselves, "They shall return, and discern between the righteous and the wicked," Malachi 3:18.

Are made manifest] i.e. Are begun to be, and more and more shall be, if our sins hinder not.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Revelation 15:4". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/revelation-15.html. 1865-1868.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Revelation 15:4. πάντα τὰ ἔθνη, all nations) Here is declared both the conversion of all nations (comp. Jeremiah 16:19), and the moving cause, together with the time of the conversion.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Revelation 15:4". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/revelation-15.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Acknowledging, that for this God deserved to be worshipped and served by all the world, because of his holiness, much seen in the justice and truth of his ways; declaring their faith and hope, that now all nations should own and acknowledge Christ, and be subject unto him, now that his judgments upon antichrist, and his justice in all his dispensations, was made so evident to the world.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Revelation 15:4". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/revelation-15.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

Святая и совершенная природа Бога неизбежно требует свершения суда (ср. Пс. 18:10; Наум. 1:3, 6). После того как праведный Божий суд закончится, Он установит Тысячелетнее Царство Христа на земле, и избранные от всех народов придут и будут прославлять Его (ср. Пс. 65:4; Ис. 66:23; Флп. 2:9-11).

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Revelation 15:4". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/revelation-15.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

The salvation of the righteous and the destruction of the wicked are both from God. One is a display of his grace, the other of his justice; and in both he is glorious, blessed, and worthy of everlasting confidence, affection, and praise.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Revelation 15:4". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/revelation-15.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Foy E. Wallace's Commentary on the Book of Revelation

2. Who shall not fear thee, 0 Lord, and glorify thy name? for thou only art holy: for all nations shall come and worship before thee, for thy judgments are made manifest --15:4. The interrogation, "Who shall not fear thee?" was expressive of complete and unalloyed adoration, short of the late irreverent familiarity. The refrain thou only art holy was the superlative holiness inherent only in God. The declaration all nations shall come and worship before thee was promissory of liberation from Roman image idolatry and the freedom of all men to worship God. The judicial declaration for thy judgments are manifest had reference to the meeting out of retributive justice to the oppressors of the saints.

The song is a combination of many triumphant expressions of Old Testament psalmody of praise and adoration pertaining to Israel's deliverance from enemy nations and lord of dominion, and again represents a parallel of apocalypses of Old Testament Israel and the New Testament church.

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Wallace, Foy E. "Commentary on Revelation 15:4". "Foy E. Wallace's Commentary on the Book of Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/foy/revelation-15.html. 1966.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

It is inevitable that everyone fears God and glorifies Him. The rhetorical questions make this crystal clear (cf. Revelation 13:4). This will happen after He finishes judging (cf. Psalm 86:8-10; Jeremiah 10:7). One reason for this fear and glory is God"s unapproachable majesty (Gr. hosios). Another is the fact that everyone will worship Him when Christ returns because He has purged the earth. He will reveal His righteous acts when He judges the earth. The martyrs do not refer to what they did in overcoming the beast but to what God is and did.

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 15:4". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/revelation-15.html. 2012.

Gary Hampton Commentary on Selected Books

Everyone will at last have to honor God (Philippians 2:9-11) because he is pure. All nations, even Rome, will worship before God"s throne and acknowledge his justice in judgments both for rewarding the redeemed and in punishment of the wicked.

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Hampton, Gary. "Commentary on Revelation 15:4". "Gary Hampton Commentary on Selected Books". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ghc/revelation-15.html. 2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Thee. The texts omit.

glorify. Greek. doxazo. Only here and Revelation 18:7 in Rev. See p. 1511.

holy. See Acts 2:27.

nations = the nations.

worship. App-137.

judgments = righteous sentence. App-177 and App-191.

are = were.

made manifest. App-106.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Revelation 15:4". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/revelation-15.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Who shall not fear thee, O Lord, and glorify thy name? for thou only art holy: for all nations shall come and worship before thee; for thy judgments are made manifest.

Who shall not - `Who is there but must fear thee?' Compare Moses' song, Exodus 15:14-16, on the fear which God's judgments strike into the foe.

Thee. So 'Aleph ('), Syriac; but A B C, Vulgate, Cyprian, reject "thee."

All nations shall come. Alluding to Psalms 22:27-31 : cf. Isaiah 66:23; Jeremiah 16:19. The conversion of all nations shall be when Christ shall come, and not until then; the first moving cause will be Christ's manifested judgments preparing all hearts for receiving Christ's mercy. He shall effect by His presence what we have in vain tried to effect in His absence. The present preaching of the Gospel is gathering out the elect remnant; meanwhile "the mystery of iniquity" is at work, and will at last come to its crisis: then shall judgment descend on the apostates at the harvestend of the age (Matthew 13:39-40), when the tares shall be cleared out of the earth, which thenceforward becomes Messiah's kingdom. The confederacy of apostates against Christ becomes, when overthrown with fearful judgments, the very means, in God's overruling providence, of preparing the nations not joined in the anti-Christian league to submit themselves to Him.

Judgments - `righteousness.'

Are - `were:' the prophetic past for the immediate future.

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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 15:4". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/revelation-15.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(4) Who shall not fear . . .—Rather, Who will not fear, &c. (the word “Thee” should be omitted, because Thou art holy. The word rendered “holy” is not that which is usually employed when the holiness of God is spoken of; it is a word which, when applied to men, denotes one who reverences the sacred obligations of natural and moral order, apart from the thought of mere law or custom. The word is applied here, and in Revelation 16:5, to God, and denotes the recognition of those sacred obligations which the character of God, if I may say so with reverence, imposes upon Himself. It is the remembrance that God will, as Judge of all the earth, do right, and will vindicate the expectations of those who stay themselves upon His character, which generates a holy fear of Him.

All nations shall come and worship . . .—Translate, All the nations worship, because Thy judgments (or, righteous acts) are manifested. The song is one in anticipation. The angels of judgment are going forth; the righteous dealings of God will be seen; but these things are spoken of as though accomplished: their completion is a divine certainty.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Revelation 15:4". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/revelation-15.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Who shall not fear thee, O Lord, and glorify thy name? for thou only art holy: for all nations shall come and worship before thee; for thy judgments are made manifest.
Who
Exodus 15:14-16; Psalms 89:7; Isaiah 60:5; Jeremiah 5:22; 10:7; Hosea 3:5; Luke 12:4,5
and glorify
Psalms 22:23; 86:9; Isaiah 24:15; 25:3; Romans 15:9; 2 Thessalonians 1:10-12
thou only
3:7; 4:8; 6:10; 1 Samuel 2:2; Psalms 22:3; 99:5,9; 111:9; Isaiah 6:3; 57:15; Habakkuk 1:12; 1 Peter 1:16
for all
11:15; Psalms 22:27; 86:9; 117:1-2; Isaiah 45:23; 66:18-20,22; Jeremiah 16:19; Zechariah 2:11; 8:20-23; 14:16; Malachi 1:11
for thy
16:7; 19:2; Psalms 97:8; 105:7; Isaiah 26:9
Reciprocal: Exodus 7:4 - by great;  Exodus 15:11 - fearful;  Deuteronomy 32:4 - all his;  Deuteronomy 32:43 - avenge;  Judges 5:1 - Sang Deborah;  1 Kings 8:40 - fear thee;  2 Kings 4:1 - thy servant did fear;  2 Kings 17:36 - him shall ye fear;  1 Chronicles 16:25 - great;  1 Chronicles 21:30 - he was afraid;  Job 13:11 - Shall;  Psalm 21:13 - so will;  Psalm 33:5 - He;  Psalm 33:8 - the earth;  Psalm 34:9 - fear;  Psalm 36:12 - There;  Psalm 46:10 - I will be;  Psalm 48:1 - greatly;  Psalm 48:11 - because;  Psalm 51:4 - when;  Psalm 52:6 - righteous;  Psalm 57:11 - GeneralPsalm 65:5 - righteousness;  Psalm 66:4 - GeneralPsalm 67:7 - all the;  Psalm 68:32 - ye kingdoms;  Psalm 72:17 - all nations;  Psalm 76:7 - even thou;  Psalm 94:15 - But;  Psalm 96:4 - he is;  Psalm 96:8 - the glory;  Psalm 98:1 - for he;  Psalm 99:3 - for it;  Psalm 101:1 - I will sing;  Psalm 105:2 - Sing unto;  Psalm 111:7 - works;  Psalm 119:137 - GeneralPsalm 145:7 - sing;  Psalm 145:17 - righteous;  Psalm 150:2 - for his mighty;  Proverbs 29:16 - but;  Ecclesiastes 3:14 - God doeth it;  Isaiah 2:10 - for fear;  Isaiah 5:16 - God that is holy;  Isaiah 8:13 - and let him;  Isaiah 12:1 - O Lord;  Isaiah 29:23 - fear the God;  Isaiah 49:26 - and all;  Isaiah 52:10 - made;  Isaiah 66:23 - shall all;  Jeremiah 44:10 - neither;  Lamentations 1:18 - Lord;  Ezekiel 14:23 - that I have not;  Ezekiel 38:23 - and I;  Jonah 1:9 - and I;  Micah 4:1 - and people;  Habakkuk 2:14 - the earth;  Habakkuk 3:2 - I have;  Zechariah 8:22 - GeneralMalachi 1:14 - my name;  Malachi 3:16 - that feared;  Mark 4:41 - feared;  Luke 1:49 - and;  Luke 11:2 - Hallowed;  Luke 13:9 - if not;  Luke 23:40 - Dost;  John 17:11 - Holy;  Acts 5:11 - GeneralActs 10:2 - one;  Romans 1:21 - they glorified;  Romans 2:2 - judgment;  Romans 9:14 - Is there unrighteousness;  2 Thessalonians 1:5 - righteous;  2 Thessalonians 1:6 - GeneralHebrews 12:28 - with reverence;  Revelation 4:10 - worship;  Revelation 7:11 - and worshipped;  Revelation 11:13 - gave;  Revelation 14:7 - Fear;  Revelation 19:10 - worship;  Revelation 22:9 - worship God

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Revelation 15:4". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/revelation-15.html.

Walter Scott's Commentary on Revelation

Revelation 15:4. — Then the victors in their song throw out a universal interrogation. "Who shall not fear (Thee), O Lord, and glorify Thy Name?" The threefold repetition of the conjunction for supplies three reasons, each grounded upon the character of God, why all should comply with the interrogative claim to fear the Lord and glorify His Name. (1) "For (Thou) only (art) holy." The word here rendered "holy" is not the word usually applied to God in speaking of His holy character. It is used here and in Revelation 16:5 of Him, otherwise it is applied to men as denoting the sum of moral qualities of a divine character. But in the two apocalyptic references it signifies that the sum of qualities in God alone entitles Him to the exclusive worship of the creature. The word "holy" as employed here denotes therefore all in God entitling Him alone to worship. In the Septuagint we have the same word in "the sure mercies of David" (Isaiah 55:3). How fitting the application of this word to the Lord at a time when the world wonders after and worships the Beast, a worship and homage to which God alone is entitled, as signified by this word "holy." (2) "For all nations shall come and worship before Thee." The prophecies of the book are generally cast in the present tense, but the one before us is an exception. The future is employed. As a result of these ways of judgment by the "King of nations" the iron will of the peoples is broken, and they turn from human props and confidences to God, and worship in His presence. It will be the time and fulfilment of such Scriptures as Psalms 100:1-5; Psalms 148:1-14; Isaiah 2:2-4; Isaiah 56:6-7; Zechariah 14:16-17, etc. (3) "For Thy righteousnesses{*The same word in Revelation 19:8. Only in our text it is applied to judgments on the wicked, whereas in the other Scripture it is employed to set forth the righteousness or righteous acts of the saints. In a footnote to Revelation 19:8 in "The New Translation (Morrish, London) the learned translator says: "In Hebrew the plural of acts expressing a quality is used for the abstract quality itself. This may be the case by analogy here (also in Revelation 15:4). So Psalms 11:7, where in Hebrew it is ‘righteousness,' but it is actual, not imputed."} have been made manifest." The manifestation of God's righteous acts of judgment is indicated in the plural "righteousnesses." God declaring Himself in judgment is surely a powerful reason why His Name should be glorified.

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Scott, Walter. "Commentary on Revelation 15:4". "Walter Scott's Commentary on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sor/revelation-15.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

The occasion for this great rejoicing is the prospect of judgments that are soon t-o be inflicted upon the powers of Rome whose hold upon the people has just been broken by the effects of the Reformation. That is why they exclaim about the worthiness of the Lord to be glorified. All nations shall come and worship before thee. Their worship will consist in doing homage to God as the true object of praise, for the light of truth that the Bible shed on them since it was given back to them. Through that channel of information they have been informed that God's judgments are just.

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Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on Revelation 15:4". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/revelation-15.html. 1952.

Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation

Revelation 15:4

Revelation 15:4 Who shall not fear thee, O Lord, and glorify thy name? for thou only art holy: for all nations shall come and worship before thee; for thy judgments are made manifest.

Who, that Isaiah, what man is there, high or low, rich or poor, bond or free, Prince or Potentate, but

shall fear thee, O Lord,

that Isaiah, with a filial fear and reverence. { Nehemiah 1:10-11} Worship, and obedience.

And glorify thy name;

that Isaiah, exalt the great and glorious name of the Lord God Almighty, acknowledging, that he is worthy to receive glory and honour, praise and dominion, { Revelation 4:10-11; Revelation 5:13-14}

For thou only art holy.

Most holy, glorious in holiness, { Exodus 15:11}

For all nations shall come and worship before thee, { Isaiah 60:12} for thy judgments are made manifest,

that Isaiah, in judging the great whore, { Revelation 18:8} And executing his seven last plagues upon the Roman papal kingdom of the beast, the false Prophet, and whole mystical Babylon. { Revelation 18:9-21} God is known by the judgments that he executeth. { Psalm 9:16} Gods judgments executed upon Babylon, will be a means of conversion both of Jews and Gentiles. See Revelation 11:13.

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Knollys, Hanserd. "Commentary on Revelation 15:4". "Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hkc/revelation-15.html.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

4.Only art holy—Even we, the redeemed, are holy only from thee.

All nations—A premonition of the time when the world shall be filled with the true knowledge and worship of God. And it is to be noted that the nations, though overthrown in their profane character, are not destroyed, but so attracted as to come and worship. See notes on Revelation 20:1-4.

Are made manifest—The prophetic preterite-future, prospecting the coming judgment on the great city.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Revelation 15:4". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/revelation-15.html. 1874-1909.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Revelation 15:4. God’s holiness is the reason why his name must be feared and magnified, especially when its effects are visible in the reverent homage of all nations to God (a hyperbolical statement in view of Revelation 16:9, etc.) at the sight of his “deeds of judgment” ( = judicial sentences, here of condemnation and penalty) inflicted on the world (cf.Daniel 9:14 f.). The absolute and unique (note the prophet’s insertion of ) reign of Yahveh was a traditional tenet of Mosaism; indeed for Orientals generally the power which formed their ideal source of righteousness and justice partook necessarily of a monarchic character (R. S. 74 f.). To the Semites it appeared that the perfection of their god as a just king formed a ground for his ultimate sovereignty over the nations of the world. The O.T. outlook and the phraseology warn us not to press the poetical language too closely here; otherwise (cf.Revelation 14:6-7) it would contradict, e.g., the characteristic idea of the author that the bowl-plagues, instead of producing penitence and submission, ended in defiant blasphemy.— , here a reverential periphrasis, it being considered in the later O.T. literature, the Targums, and the N.T. (occasionally) more respectful to worship and pray before the royal god than directly to him (Dalman, i. viii. 5). For the whole conception of this dual song see Targ. Jonath. on Isaiah 26:1 and Targ. Schir Haschirim i. 1; the latter reckons ten songs altogether, (1) Adam’s at his forgiveness, (2) that of Moses and the Israelites at the Red Sea, (3) that of the Israelites, when the spring of water was given them, (4) that of Moses at his death, (5) Joshua’s at Gibeon, (6) that of Barak and Deborah, (7) Hannah’s, (8) David’s, (9) Solomon’s, and (10) that which the children of the captivity are to sing when the Lord frees them. It tallies with this expectation that the new song of the Apocalypse (Revelation 5:9, Revelation 14:3) is always a song of Christ’s redemption.

Revelation 15:5 to Revelation 16:1: the introduction to the seven bowls or plagues.

 

 

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Bibliographical Information
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Revelation 15:4". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/revelation-15.html. 1897-1910.