Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Revelation 19:8

It was given to her to clothe herself in fine linen, bright and clean; for the fine linen is the righteous acts of the saints.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Bride;   Church;   Colors;   Garment;   Holiness;   Linen;   Marriage;   Righteous;   Vision;   Scofield Reference Index - Bride;   Garment;   Righteousness;   Summary;   Thompson Chain Reference - Adorning;   Church;   Clothing;   Raiment, White;   White;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Church, the;   Excellency and Glory of the Church, the;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Linen;   Solomon's Song;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Church;   Dress;   Joy;   Marriage;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Christians, Names of;   Church, the;   Marriage;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Colour;   Marriage;   Solomon, Song of;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Canticles;   ;   Curtains;   Flax;   Fringes;   Jeshua;   Linen;   Marriage;   Pomegranate;   Woolen Linen;   Zechariah, the Book of;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Revelation, the Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Hope;   Marriage;   Symbol;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Atonement (2);   Clothes;   Linen ;   Marriage;   Ordinance;   Parousia;   Perseverance;   Righteousness;   Trade and Commerce;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Marriage;   Righteousness;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Church;   Espoused;   Linen;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Antichrist;   Marriage;   Solomon the song of;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Marriage;   Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Linen;   Needlework;   Robe;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Array;   Clean;   Fine;   Linen;   Revelation of John:;   Song of Songs;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for November 11;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Arrayed in fine linen - A prediction that the Church should become more pure in her doctrines, more pious in her experience, and more righteous in her conduct, than she had ever been from her formation.

The fine linen here spoken of is not the righteousness of Christ imputed to believers, for it is here called the righteousness of the saints - that which the grace and Spirit of Christ has wrought in them.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Revelation 19:8". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/revelation-19.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And to her was granted - It is not said here by whom this was granted, but it is perhaps implied that this was conferred by the Saviour himself on his bride.

That she should be arrayed in fine linen, clean and white - See the notes on Revelation 3:4-5, Revelation 3:18; Revelation 7:13. White has, perhaps, in all countries been the usual color of the bridal dress - as an emblem of innocence.

For the fine linen is the righteousness of saints - Represents the righteousness of the saints; or is an emblem of it. It should be remarked, however, that it is implied here, as it is everywhere in the Scriptures, that this is not their own righteousness, for it is said that this was “given” to the bride - to the saints. It is the gracious bestowment of their Lord; and the reference here must be to that righteousness which they obtain by faith - the righteousness which results from justification through the merits of the Redeemer. Of this Paul speaks, when he says Philippians 3:9, “And be found in him, not having mine own righteousness, which is of the law, but what is through the faith of Christ, the righteousness which is of God by faith.” Compare the notes on Romans 3:25-26.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Revelation 19:8". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/revelation-19.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And to her was granted that she should be arrayed in fine linen,.... Or "Byssine": the "Byssus", of which fine linen is made, is said to grow on a tree, in height like to a poplar, and its leaves like a willow, and to be brought out of Judea into Egypt, which the Egyptians used in most of their holy thingsF17Philostrat. Vita Apollon. l. 2. c. 9. Vid. Apul. Apolog. p. 225. Pausan. l. 5. sive Eliac. p. 294. . A dress neat and modest, and not like the attire of the whore of Rome, Revelation 17:4 and this is said to be

clean and white, and is interpreted in the next clause:

for the fine linen is the righteousness of saints, or "righteousnesses"; not good works, or their own righteousness; for though these are evidences of faith, by which the saints are justified, and are what God has prepared for them, that they should walk in them; yet these are not comparable to fine linen, clean and white, but are like filthy rags, and cannot justify in the sight of God; but the righteousness of Christ is meant, and justification by that; for that is the only justifying righteousness of the saints: and though it is but one, yet it may be called "righteousnesses", or "justifications", in the plural number; partly because of the several seasons in which the act of justification passes, first in God's mind from eternity, next on Christ as the surety, when he rose from the dead, and on all the elect in him, and then in the consciences of the saints when they believe, and the sentence of it will be notified and declared to men and angels at the last judgment; and partly because of the many persons that are justified by it, as also because of the excellency of it; so the Jews use the word in the plural number: the Targumist on Zechariah 3:4 paraphrases the text, "I will clothe thee" זכוך, "with righteousnesses"F18See Isa. lxi. 10. & Targum in Hos. x. 12. ; upon which words Jarchi has this note,

"change of beautiful garments is all one as if it had been said זכיות "righteousnesses": and because sin is like to filthy garments, righteousness is like to garments beautiful and white.'

Christ's righteousness may be compared to fine linen, clean and white, because of its spotless purity; those that are arrayed with it being unblamable and irreprovable, and without spot and blemish, and without fault before the throne; with this the Jewish church will be clothed; all the Lord's people will be righteous, they will have on the best robe, and wedding garment, which was despised by the Jews in Christ's time, who refused to come to the marriage feast; and their being arrayed with it will be owing to the grace of Christ, who grants it; and so Christ's righteousness is called the gift of righteousness, the free gift, and gift by grace, and abundance of grace; and faith, which receives it, and puts it on, is the gift of God, Romans 5:15. Not only the garment is a gift of grace, but the putting of it on is a grant from Christ, and what he himself does, Isaiah 61:10.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Revelation 19:8". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/revelation-19.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And to her was granted that she should be arrayed in 8 fine linen, clean and white: for the fine 9 linen is the b righteousness of saints.

(8) As an ensign of kingly and priestly dignity, which Christ bestows on us in (Revelation 1:6). {(9)} This is a gift given by the husband for marriage sake, and a most choice ornament which Christ gave to us, as to his spouse.

(b) Good works which are lively testimonies of faith.

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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Revelation 19:8". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/revelation-19.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

granted — Though in one sense she “made herself ready,” having by the Spirit‘s work in her put on “the wedding garment,” yet in the fullest sense it is not she, but her Lord, who makes her ready by “granting to her that she be arrayed in fine linen.” It is He who, by giving Himself for her, presents her to Himself a glorious Church, not having spot, but holy and without blemish. It is He also who sanctifies her, naturally vile and without beauty, with the washing of water by the word, and puts His own comeliness on her, which thus becomes hers.

clean and white — so Andreas. But A and B transpose. Translate, “bright and pure”; at once brilliantly splendid and spotless as in the bride herself.

righteousnessGreek, “righteousnesses”; distributively used. Each saint must have this righteousness: not merely be justified, as if the righteousness belonged to the Church in the aggregate; the saints together have righteousnesses; namely, He is accounted as “the Lord our righteousness” to each saint on his believing, their robes being made white in the blood of the Lamb. The righteousness of the saint is not, as Alford erroneously states, inherent, but is imputed: if it were otherwise, Christ would be merely enabling the sinner to justify himself. Romans 5:18 is decisive on this. Compare Article XI, Church of England. The justification already given to the saints in title and unseen possession, is now GIVEN them in manifestation: they openly walk with Christ in white. To this, rather than to their primary justification on earth, the reference is here. Their justification before the apostate world, which had persecuted them, contrasts with the judgment and condemnation of the harlot. “Now that the harlot has fallen, the woman triumphs” [Auberlen]. Contrast with the pure fine linen (indicating the simplicity and purity) of the bride, the tawdry ornamentation of the harlot. Babylon, the apostate Church, is the antithesis to new Jerusalem, the transfigured Church of God. The woman (Revelation 12:1-6), the harlot (Revelation 17:1-7), the bride (Revelation 19:1-10), are the three leading aspects of the Church.

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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 19:8". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/revelation-19.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

That she should array herself (ινα περιβαληταιhina peribalētai). Sub-final object clause subject of εδοτηedothē (was given to her) with ιναhina and the second aorist middle (direct) of περιβαλλωperiballō to fling around. This bridal dress is a gift from Christ. This form, εδοτηedothē (it was given), occurs some 20 times in this book.

In fine linen, bright and pure (βυσσινον λαμπρον καταρονbussinon lampron katharon). See Revelation 19:14 for the same raiment on those accompanying “The Word of God” and for the seven angels in Revelation 15:6. See by contrast the garments of the harlot (Revelation 17:4; Revelation 18:16). For βυσσινονbussinon see Revelation 18:16.

The righteous acts of the saints (τα δικαιωματα των αγιωνta dikaiōmata tōn hagiōn). This is the explanation (γαρgar) of the bridal dress and explains why there is work for the Bride as well as for Christ (Philippians 2:12.). See Revelation 15:4 for δικαιωμαdikaiōma (also Romans 5:18).

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Revelation 19:8". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/revelation-19.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Fine linen ( βύσσινον )

See on Luke 16:19. The four vestments of the ordinary Jewish priest were made of linen or byssus. Their symbolic meaning depended in part on the whiteness and luster of their substance ( καθαρὸν καὶ λαμπρόν pureand bright ).

Righteousness ( δικαιώματα )

More strictly, as Rev. righteous acts.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 19:8". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/revelation-19.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And to her was granted that she should be arrayed in fine linen, clean and white: for the fine linen is the righteousness of saints.

And it is given to her — By God. The bride is all holy men, the whole invisible church.

To be arrayed in fine linen, white and clean — This is an emblem of the righteousness of the saints - Both of their justification and sanctification.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Revelation 19:8". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/revelation-19.html. 1765.

Scofield's Reference Notes

righteousness

The garment is Scripture is a symbol of righteousness. In the bad ethical sense it symbolizes self-righteousness (e.g) Isaiah 64:6; Philippians 3:6-8 the best that a moral and religious man under law could do). In the good ethical sense the garment symbolizes "the righteousness of God.. .upon all them that believe."

(See Scofield "Romans 3:21").

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Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Revelation 19:8". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/revelation-19.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

8 And to her was granted that she should be arrayed in fine linen, clean and white: for the fine linen is the righteousness of saints.

Ver. 8. And to her was granted] It is here clear (saith Bernard) that there shall be as great difference between the state of God’s Church now, and that which is to come after Rome’s ruin, as between the time of honourable persons only betrothed, and the high, joyful, and glorious day of their public marrying; as between the time of a king coming on to his kingdom, and his actual and powerful reigning as king indeed.

That she should be arrayed] This also is given her, as well as her rich raiment; which she can no more put on by herself than she can purchase it.

Clean and white] Or, pure and bright. Pure, saith one, because imputed righteousness is pure indeed, and hath no spot in it; but not bright; you can see no great matter in it; it maketh no great show before men (as inherent righteousness doth, Matthew 5:16), but before God. A man may be very much defiled and subject to many scandals, and yet be clothed with the garment of imputed righteousness.

The righteousness of saints] Gr. righteousnesses, that twofold righteousness, imputed and imparted.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Revelation 19:8". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/revelation-19.html. 1865-1868.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Revelation 19:8. γὰρ, for) A particle of explanation, as Revelation 19:10.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Revelation 19:8". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/revelation-19.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

And to her was granted; that is, to the Lamb’s wife, whether Jews or Gentiles, or both.

That she should be arrayed in fine linen, clean and white; that she should be clothed with the righteousness of Christ, reckoned to her for righteousness. This

is the righteosness of the saints; called the righteousness of God, Romans 1:17; a righteousness through the faith of Christ, Philippians 3:9: called righteousness, in the Greek, because there are many saints to be clothed with it; and because it is imputed both for justification and sanctificaion, not to excuse us from holiness, but to make up our defects.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Revelation 19:8". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/revelation-19.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

праведность святых При спасении верующие не получают присущую Христу праведность, а являют практические результаты Его праведности в своей жизни, т.е. внешнее проявление внутренних добродетелей.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Revelation 19:8". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/revelation-19.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Is the righteousness of saints; representing their righteousness.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Revelation 19:8". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/revelation-19.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And it was given unto her that she should array herself in fine linen, bright and pure: for the fine linen is the righteous acts of the saints.

For the linen is the righteous acts of the saints ... This clearly means that the righteous acts done by Christians are indeed the fine linen in which the bride must be arrayed. But are not these "given to her"? Yes, but not in any sense of her not having to do them. God gives his saints all kinds of righteous deeds through his holy commandments telling them what to do, and through the motivation to do them provided in the selfless example of our Blessed Lord. "The double nature of the process is here set forth, tit was given to her;' the power came from God; and yet she arrays herself; the action is still voluntary."[18] "Righteous acts flow from a righteous character, which is entirely of the grace of God";[19] but the righteous deeds do not do themselves! They are not done by the believer's faith, nor by the Holy Spirit, but they are done by the believer. Morris voiced a common view thus, "The white robes are not provided by any righteous acts on the part of the wearers,"[20] but this is true only in a certain limited sense. The metaphor of putting on the garments is also prominent here. The bride arrayed herself. "From one point of view, she made the dress herself; she worked out her own salvation."[21] The impact of this verse is so strong against the popular heresy of Solifidianism, that some of the commentators have reached for the explanation of last resort and called it "a gloss"! "It has the sound of some commentator's explanation."[22] Of course, there is no evidence whatever of this verse being a gloss; and those who resort to such an allegation confess in so doing that it contradicts what they are teaching.

[18] A. Plummer, The Pulpit Commentary, Vol. 22, Revelation (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1950), p. 448.

[19] Charles Caldwell Ryrie, Revelation (Chicago: Moody Press, 1968), p. 111.

[20] Leon Morris, Tyndale Commentaries, New Testament, Vol. 20, The Revelation of St. John (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1969), p. 227.

[21] Michael Wilcock, I Saw Heaven Opened (Downers Grove, Illinois: InterVarsity Press, 1975), p. 172.

[22] Isbon T. Beckwith, op. cit., p. 727.

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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Revelation 19:8". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/revelation-19.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘And it was given to her that she should array herself in fine linen, bright and pure. For the fine linen is the righteous behaviour of God’s people.’

It is the privilege of God’s people that they can array themselves in beauty, because God has made them beautiful. We must ever be mindful that we are preparing ourselves to be the bride of Christ. Elsewhere the emphasis is rightly on Christ’s provision for His bride (Revelation 6:11; Revelation 7:14) but here all emphasis is on the bride’s own preparations. She loves the Bridegroom and has striven to make herself pleasing in His eyes. Although of course an important part of her preparation lay in ‘making them (her clothes) white in the blood of the Lamb’ (Revelation 7:14).

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Revelation 19:8". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/revelation-19.html. 2013.

Foy E. Wallace's Commentary on the Book of Revelation

The figurative clause his wife hath made herself ready was the symbol of victory over the evil forces of opposition --the verse declares that she was already his wife, and envisions the spiritual relation as a complete process, not as a single thing.

That the Lamb's wife should be arrayed in fine linen, clean and white was explained to be the righteousness of the saints, the purity of the New Jerusalem church in contrast with the iniquities of the harlot Jerusalem, which had gone up in the smoke of destruction forever. This attire of clean and white vestures was a beautiful symbol of the character of all who are truly joined in union with Christ. They were the ones called unto the marriage supper of the Lamb, the equal in number of all who were in the married relation with Christ. This metaphor comparable to the illustration of the wedding garment in the parable of Matthew 22:11-13, which was necessary to entrance into the feast; without which the intruder would have been cast out. The guests of the marriage feast were themselves the Bride in the parable, and parallel with they which are called unto the marriage supper in verse nine of this chapter. They were equal in number with the church itself.

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Wallace, Foy E. "Commentary on Revelation 19:8". "Foy E. Wallace's Commentary on the Book of Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/foy/revelation-19.html. 1966.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The angelic chorus continued to describe the preparation of the bride for the wedding feast. God graciously enabled her to clothe herself in fine linen (cf. Revelation 6:4; Revelation 8:3; Revelation 9:5; Revelation 15:6; Revelation 18:12; Revelation 19:14; Genesis 41:42; Isaiah 61:10; Daniel 10:5; Daniel 12:6-7). "Bright" indicates divine glory. [Note: Theological Dictionary of the New Testament, s.v. "Lampo ...," by A. Oepke.] "Clean" reflects purity (cf. Revelation 21:18; Revelation 21:21). This is dress appropriate for God"s presence. Fine linen represents righteous deeds, as this verse explains (cf. Revelation 14:13). These are the works of the saints rather than their standing before God. Their good deeds, which God"s grace made possible, make them dressed appropriately for their righteous Lord (cf. Matthew 22:1-14). The bride"s clothing contrasts with the harlot"s gaudy garments (cf. Revelation 17:4; Revelation 18:16).

"Contrast the prostitute and her lovers in the preceding chapters with the Lamb and His chaste bride ..." [Note: Johnson, p571.]

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 19:8". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/revelation-19.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Revelation 19:8. And it was given to her that she should array herself in fine linen bright and pure, for the fine linen is the righteous acts of the saints. The bride arrays herself in her garments of beauty, that she may go forth to meet the Bridegroom, may enter in with Him to the marriage ceremony, and may be united to Him for ever in the marriage bond. Her robes are of dazzling whiteness, free from every stain; nor are they an outward show. Her righteousness is more than imputed, and her whole being is penetrated by it. She is in Christ; she is one with Him; His righteousness takes possession of her in such a manner that it becomes her own; it is a part of herself and of her life. St. John had no fear of saying that the redeemed shall be presented before God in ‘righteous acts’ of their own. He could not think of them except as at once justified and sanctified in Jesus.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Revelation 19:8". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/revelation-19.html. 1879-90.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Fine linen. The symbol of justification, or the good works and merit of her holy members; the most pleasing attire in which she can present herself to the Lamb. Her robe is glittering and white, because she has been purified as silver in a furnace, and washed white in the waters of tribulation and persecution. (Pastorini) --- The fine linen, or byssus, here mentioned, is, according to Calmet, a kind of silk produced by a shell-fish, called pinna; though the same learned commentator allows that the Greek authors use this word for fine linen.

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Revelation 19:8". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/revelation-19.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

that = in order that. Greek. hina.

clean and white. The texts read "bright and pure". See Revelation 15:6.

righteousness. App-191. Plural.

saints = the saints. See Acts 9:13.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Revelation 19:8". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/revelation-19.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And to her was granted that she should be arrayed in fine linen, clean and white: for the fine linen is the righteousness of saints.

Granted. Though in one sense she 'made herself ready,' by the Spirit's work in her, putting on "the wedding garment," yet, in the fullest sense, not she, but her Lord, makes her ready, by 'granting to her that she be arrayed in short linen.' It is He who, by giving Himself for her, presents her to Himself a glorious Church, not having spot, but holy and without blemish (Ephesians 5:5-27). He sanctifies her, naturally vile and without beauty, with the washing of water by the Word, and puts His own comeliness on her.

Clean and white. So Andreas: but 'Aleph (') A B transpose, 'bright and pure:' brilliantly splendid and spotless as the Bride herself.

Righteousness - `righteousnesses:' distributively. Each saint must have righteousness; not merely be justified, as if it belonged to the Church in the aggregate. The saints together have righteousness: Christ is accounted "the Lord our righteousness" to each on believing, the robe being made white in the blood of the Lamb. The righteousness of the saint is not inherent, but imputed. If it were otherwise, Christ would be merely enabling the sinner to justify himself. Romans 5:18-19, is decisive. Compare Article XI, Church of England. The justification already given in title and unseen possession, is now GIVEN the saints in manifestation-they openly walk with Christ in white. This, rather than their primary justification on earth, is the reference here. Their justification before the world, which persecuted them, contrasts with the judgment on the harlot. 'Now that the harlot has fallen, the woman triumphs' (Auberlen). Contrast with the Bride's [ bussinon (Greek #1039), not the linon (Greek #3043) of the angels, Revelation 15:6] pure fine linen (indicating simplicity and purity), the harlot's (Revelation 17:4; Revelation 18:16) tawdry ornamentation. Babylon, the apostate church, is antithesis to new Jerusalem, the transfigured Church. The woman (Revelation 12:1-17), the harlot (Revelation 17:1-18), the Bride (Revelation 19:1-21), are the Church's three aspects.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 19:8". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/revelation-19.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(8) And to her was granted . . .—Better, And it was given to her that she should be clothed in fine linen, bright, pure; for the fine linen is the righteousness (or, righteousnesses; the word is plural) of the saints. This verse is not to be taken as part of the song. The song closes with the announcement that the Lamb’s wife has made herself ready. Then follows the explanation of this readiness: she is adorned in fine linen. Her apparel is in contrast to the harlot: it is not purple and scarlet (Revelation 17:4; Revelation 18:16), but pure white. The symbol is explained: “the fine linen is the righteousness (or, righteousnesses) of the saints.” The raiment is that which strikes the eye: it has its character, and it indicates the character of the wearer. The harlot attracts by ostentatious colours, the tokens of qualities more conspicuous than abiding, more dazzling than helpful; the Lamb’s wife is robed in pure and stainless white, the token of those high, moral, spiritual qualities by which she has been known. The source of these righteousnesses is divine: it is given to her to be so arrayed. It is no fictitious righteousness: it is real, it is hers, though it would never have been hers but for Him without whom she can do nothing (comp. John 15:4-5, and Philippians 3:8-10): and it is through the wearing of this white flower of a blameless life that she has borne witness for her Lord, and against the spirit of harlotry and sin (Matthew 7:16-18).

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Revelation 19:8". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/revelation-19.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And to her was granted that she should be arrayed in fine linen, clean and white: for the fine linen is the righteousness of saints.
to her
3:4,5,18; Psalms 45:13,14; Isaiah 61:10; Ezekiel 16:10; Matthew 22:12; Romans 3:22; Romans 13:14; Ephesians 5:26,27
white
or, bright.
Matthew 17:2; Mark 9:3; Luke 24:4; Acts 1:10
the fine
7:13,14; Psalms 132:9
Reciprocal: Exodus 25:4 - fine linen;  Exodus 26:1 - fine twined linen;  Exodus 28:2 - holy garments;  Leviticus 6:10 - linen garment;  2 Chronicles 5:12 - arrayed;  2 Chronicles 6:41 - thy priests;  Job 29:14 - I put;  Ecclesiastes 9:8 - thy garments;  Song of Solomon 1:8 - O thou;  Song of Solomon 4:9 - my spouse;  Isaiah 3:23 - fine linen;  Ezekiel 44:17 - they shall;  Daniel 12:10 - shall be;  Zechariah 3:3 - GeneralMalachi 3:2 - like fullers';  Matthew 22:11 - which;  Mark 14:22 - this;  Luke 15:22 - the best;  Ephesians 5:32 - speak;  Revelation 19:9 - Blessed;  Revelation 19:14 - clothed;  Revelation 21:2 - as

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Revelation 19:8". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/revelation-19.html.

Walter Scott's Commentary on Revelation

BRIDAL ROBES.

Revelation 19:8. — "It was given to her to be clothed in fine linen, bright (and) pure; for the fine linen is the righteousnesses of the saints." The harlot was gorgeously arrayed, but her pomp, splendour, and ornaments were claimed as a matter of right. With the bride it is different; she is arrayed as a matter of grace. "It was given to her." Undoubtedly there are rewards for service done, as Matthew 25:14-23 clearly show. "God is not unrighteous to forget your work and labour of love" (Hebrews 6:10). But it might be well for us to forget. He never will.

There is, however, another side to this question which should ever be borne in mind, namely, the sovereignty of God. His right it is to give or withhold. Many an eminent servant of God has made shipwreck of true life and service by neglect of the great balancing truth — God is sovereign. The parable of the talents in Matthew 25:1-46 shows the grace of God in rewards; whilst the parable of the householder in Matthew 20:1-34 is a demonstration of the sovereignty of God in giving to all alike, irrespective of toil or length of service.

The garment of pure linen in which the Vial angels are arrayed (Revelation 15:6) expresses the righteous character of their mission, which is one of judgment.{*Both in the case of the angels and of the bride the clothing is linen; but of the latter it is added "fine linen." See remarks on Revelation 7:14, and on Revelation 15:5, with footnotes on both pages.} The fine linen, pure and lustrous, of the bride is her righteousness, or "righteous acts" (R.V.), done on earth. But she claims no merit, for these righteous acts were wrought by the power of the Holy Ghost in her. Later on we have the bride covered with the glory of God (Revelation 21:11); here her own righteousness, not God's, is in question. The gaudy colours in which the harlot is arrayed present a sharp contrast to the pure, white, and bright linen of the bride. Her garments bespeak her practical character. She can now enter on the enjoyment of eternal companionship and union of the closest nature (that of wife) with her husband, the Lamb. Her deeds on earth have been appraised at their true value in Heaven. She is arrayed in them, or in the expressive words of our text, "has made herself ready." She passes from the bema to the marriage, and from thence to the kingdom.

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Scott, Walter. "Commentary on Revelation 19:8". "Walter Scott's Commentary on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sor/revelation-19.html.

Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation

Revelation 19:8

Revelation 19:8 And to her was granted that she should be arrayed in fine linen, clean and white: for the fine linen is the righteousness of saints.

In Revelation 19:8, is explained, how the bride, the Lamb's Wife, was made ready. That Isaiah, she was arrayed in fine linen, clean, without any spot. { Song of Solomon 4:7-10} Thou art all fair my love, their is no spot in thee.

And white

that Isaiah, washed and made white in the blood of the Lamb, Revelation 7:13-15

For the fine linen is the righteousness of saints

That Isaiah, their righteousness of justification, { 2 Corinthians 5:18} with which the saints are covered, { Isaiah 61:10} and their righteousness of sanctification, where with they are beautified. { Ephesians 4:24; Ephesians 5:9; Philippians 1:11} And Jesus Christ is made of God unto the Saints, both righteousness and sanctification. { 1 Corinthians 1:30}

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Knollys, Hanserd. "Commentary on Revelation 19:8". "Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hkc/revelation-19.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Revelation 19:8. And it was given to her to be arrayed in a clothing of fine linen, shining, pure. For the linen are the righteousnesses of the saints. After the expression, "it was given to her," we might suppose, that by the white clothing here was denoted the glory, which the bride was to receive as the reward of her preparation—comp. ch. Revelation 6:11. But the impartation of the completed glory, which alone could be thought of here, lies beyond the limits of this group. The pure, added to the shining, points to the distinction between washing and making white in ch. Revelation 7:14. And all doubt is removed by the explanation given, which informs us that by the shining and white linen clothing is meant, not the glory of the saints, but their excellencies. The reference to the activity of the bride in the work of preparation was already mentioned in the declaration, "She has made herself ready." So that here the other side of the matter might fitly be exhibited. In ch. Revelation 3:18, also (comp. Revelation 7:14), where the white garments likewise denote Christian excellencies, the communication of the excellencies is spoken of as a gift of grace from God. In Ephesians 5:25-27, the entire preparation of the church as the bride of Christ, is represented as proceeding from Christ. The wedding garment, too, in Matthew 22:12, has respect to the spiritual preparation that is required. Accordingly, what is mentioned here, stands related to the entire preparation as a part to the whole.

The shining denotes the glory of the holy life of the righteous; the pure, their freedom from sin, their blameless and unspotted character. From the explanation subjoined the linen-clothing signifies the righteousnesses[Note: δικαί ωμα, the right or righteously made, signifies first a legal decision made in accordance with the rule of what is just and right, then an action in accordance with the same rule of what is just and right. So, in ch. 15:4, then in Romans 5:16; Romans 5:18; see Rothe's Versuch über Romans 5:12-21, p. 101.] of the saints. The rule of justice and rectitude for the saints, according to Matthew 5:17, is the law of Moses. The clothing is elsewhere the symbol of men's state—comp. ch. Revelation 7:14. By the righteousnesses, therefore, though primarily they denote particular actions, there is yet indicated here the whole moral condition, of which those particular actions are the outward expression. But let no one imagine, that there can be the condition of a righteous person, where the actions are wanting.

Allusion is made to ch. Revelation 18:12; Revelation 18:16, comp. Revelation 17:4, where the clothing of the great whore is described. There the fine linen is also mentioned, but along with it the much-assuming and much-speaking scarlet and purple, and all, too, bespangled with gold and gems and pearls—the signs and indications of a false pomp, (1 Peter 3:3; Grotius: Cultus estgravis ut matronae, non pompaticus qualis meretricis antea descriptae). The words: and his wife, as far as the end of Revelation 19:8, have also the import of an impressive admonition. Still, that is not the most important element; nor the most prominent, which is rather the tendency of what is spoken to administer consolation. The hardest temptation is that, which calls forth the question, who then can be saved; and the most precious promise is that which assures the church, that in spite of all the infirmities of the flesh, in spite of all temptations and assaults, she shall still be found in a condition, wherein she shall be counted worthy to meet the Lord at his coming, (comp. on ch. Revelation 14:1-5).

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Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on Revelation 19:8". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/revelation-19.html.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Revelation 19:8. “Yea, she is (has been) permitted to put on” (for cf.Revelation 9:5, Mark 10:37), epexegetic of . (Isaiah 61:10). “Uides hic cultum gravem ut matronae, non pompaticum qualis meretricis ante (Revelation 17:4) descriptus,” Grot. In the following gloss (see above) the rare use of (= “righteous deeds”) is paralleled by Baruch 2:19 ( . ) and by an incidental employment of the sing in this sense by Paul (see on Romans 5:18). Moral purity and activity, which are the conditions of future and final bliss, are (as in Revelation 7:14, Revelation 14:4) defined as the outcome of human effort, although of course their existence must be referred to God ( ), and their success to the aid of Christ (loc. cit.); see on Revelation 1:4-6. Ignatius similarly (Eph. 10.) describes the saints as “robed entirely in the commandments of Christ”. The connexion of thought is the same as that in Matthew 21:43; Matthew 22:2; Matthew 22:11-14. For 8 b see the fontal passage from Sohar (cited by Gfrörer, ii. 184, 185): traditum est, quod opera bona ab homine hoc in mundo peracta, fiant ipsi uestis pretiosa in mundo illo.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Revelation 19:8". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/revelation-19.html. 1897-1910.