Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Revelation 19:9

Then he *said to me, "Write, ‘Blessed are those who are invited to the marriage supper of the Lamb.'" And he *said to me, "These are true words of God."
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Church;   Feasts;   God;   Jesus Continued;   Marriage;   Righteous;   Vision;   Thompson Chain Reference - Beattitudes, General;   Feasts;   Food, Physical-Spiritual;   Food, Spiritual;   Lamb of God;   Lamb, Christ the;   Saviour, Christ Our;   Sin-Saviour;   Spiritual;   Sufferings of Christ;   The Topic Concordance - Blessings;   Calling;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Blessed, the;   Call of God, the;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Solomon's Song;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Church;   Joy;   Miracles;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Beatitudes;   Church, the;   Hospitality;   Marriage;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Solomon, Song of;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Banquets;   Mephibosheth;   Pomegranate;   Revelation of John, the;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Banquet;   Blessing and Cursing;   Hour;   Lord's Supper;   Revelation, the Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Hope;   Marriage;   Revelation, Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Atonement (2);   Blessedness;   Call, Called, Calling;   Lamb;   Lord's Supper (Ii);   Marriage;   Supper ;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Lamb;   Marriage;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Church;   Concubine;   Espoused;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Antichrist;   Solomon the song of;   Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Supper;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Book of Life;   Revelation of John:;   Song of Songs;   Truth;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Banquets;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Blessed are they which are called unto the marriage supper - This is an evident allusion to the marriage of the king's son, Matthew 22:2, etc., where the incarnation of our Lord, and the calling of Jews and Gentiles, are particularly pointed out. See the notes on Matthew 22:2. Blessed are all they who hear the Gospel, and are thus invited to lay hold on everlasting life.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Revelation 19:9". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/revelation-19.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And he saith unto me - The angel who made these representations to him. See Revelation 19:10.

Write, Blessed are they - See the notes on Revelation 14:13.

Which are called unto the marriage-supper of the Lamb - The idea of a festival, or a marriage-supper, was a familiar one to the Jews to represent the happiness of heaven, and is frequently found in the New Testament. Compare the Luke 14:15-16; Luke 16:22; Luke 22:16 notes; Matthew 22:2 note. The image in the passage before us is that of many guests invited to a great festival.

And he saith unto me, These are the true sayings of God - Confirming all by a solemn declaration. The importance of what is here said; the desirableness of having it fixed in the mind, amidst the trials of life and the scenes of persecution through which the church was to pass, makes this solemn declaration proper. The idea is, that in all times of persecution - in every dark hour of despondency - the church, as such, and every individual member of the church, should receive it as a solemn truth never to be doubted, that the religion of Christ would finally prevail, and that all persecution and sorrow here would be followed by joy and triumph in heaven.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Revelation 19:9". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/revelation-19.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Revelation 19:9

Blessed are they which are called unto the marriage supper of the Lamb.

The marriage supper of the Lamb

I. The lamb. We know at once who this is; but it is remarkable that, with one exception and that occurring in this evangelist’s own Gospel, this is the only part of the inspired writings in which our Lord is ever called by this name. Now this could not have happened by accident. There is a meaning in it, and it is not difficult perhaps to see what it is--the Lord Jesus would have us look up to Him in heaven as the same Jesus who died for us on the Cross.

II. The marriage supper of the Lamb. Here, you observe, is a complete change of metaphor. Our Lord puts off the character of a Lamb, and takes on Him that of a Bridegroom; or rather He takes this character on Him without putting off the other.

1. A long looked for and much desired hour. The Saviour Himself desires it. It is the hour that will bring Him the consummation of all His wishes, the full reward of all His labour and sufferings. And His Church desires it. Scarcely had He disappeared, when its language was, “Come, Lord Jesus, come quickly.”

2. An hour of great love and affection. No earthly affection is equal to that of a redeemed sinner for his Saviour. There may not at times seem much warmth in it, but when it is real there is as much strength and depth in it perhaps as man’s nature, in its present state and circumstances, is capable of. But still it is an imperfect love, very much broken in upon by the love of other things, and damped by the cares of life, its business and troubles. It is an unseen object too that we love, and we find it difficult to realise anything we have never seen. And even in our best moments, we often feel as though we only half loved our Lord. We long for a better and higher nature, that we may love Him more. At this marriage supper we shall have what we long for. We shall see our Lord, and see Him in a form in which we shall know Him; and shall have souls within us, that will for the first time feel large enough to love Him, and these souls shall be filled to overflowing with admiration of and delight in Him. The love of this hour will be the perfection of love. This marriage feast will be the feast, the triumph of love--the exalted Saviour showing to the whole universe that He loves us to the utmost bound love can go, and we loving Him with a fervour, a gratitude, an adoration a delight, that are new even in heaven.

3. A scene of abounding joy. The affection that reigns in it would of itself make it so. “Let me only be with my Lord,” the Christian says, “and I ask no more. That, without anything else, will make me happy, and happy to the full.” The heavenly Bridegroom provides for His guests all that can gratify and delight them, and all too that can show His love for them and His munificence. The provisions made by Him for our enjoyment, will astonish us. So will it be with us in heaven. We shall find it a feast and a monarch’s feast.

III. Those invited or called to it.

1. They are those who have been invited before to this supper. And here we are all included.

2. They are those only who have before accepted the invitation to it.

3. These guests are yet further distinguished--they are ready and prepared for this supper. A worldly-minded, ungodly man in heaven, would be a miserable man in heaven. A prepared place for a prepared people, a holy place for a holy people--this is the heaven of the Bible.

IV. The happiness of these men. “Blessed are they which are called to the marriage supper of the Lamb.” It is not an invitation to every feast that will make a man happy. Not a snare or a danger can await them there. Not a single being will they see there who can do them harm or whom they would wish away. (C. Bradley, M. A.)

The marriage supper of the Lamb

I. The description of the bridegroom.

1. As the Lamb He is the one everlasting sacrifice for sin: He will not be other than this in His glory.

2. As the Lamb, suffering for sin, He is specially glorious in the eyes of the angels and all other holy intelligences; and so in His joyous day He wears that character.

3. As the Lamb He most fully displayed His love to His Church; and so He appears in this form on the day of His love’s triumph.

4. As the Lamb He is best loved of our souls. Behold, how He loved us even to the death!

II. The meaning of the marriage supper.

1. The completion and perfection of the Church. “His bride hath made herself ready.”

2. The rising of the Church into the nearest and happiest communion with Christ in His glory. “The marriage of the Lamb is come.” The espousals lead up to this.

3. The fulfilment of the long expectations of both.

4. The open publication of the great fact of mutual love and union.

5. The overflowing of mutual delight and joy. “Be glad and rejoice.”

6. The grandest display of magnificent munificence in a banquet.

7. The commencement of an eternally unbroken rest. “He shall rest in His love.” The Church, like Ruth, shall find rest in the house of her Husband.

III. The persons who are called to it.

1. Those who are so called as to accept the invitation.

2. Those who now possess the faith which is the token of admission.

3. Those who love Bridegroom and bride.

4. Those who have on the wedding garment of sanctification.

5. Those who watch with lamps burning.

IV. The blessedness which is ascribed to them.

1. They have a prospect which blesses them even now.

2. They have great honour in being called to such a future.

3. They will be blessed indeed when at that feast, for--Those who are called will be admitted. Those who are admitted will be married. Those who are married to Jesus will be endlessly happy. How many a marriage leads to misery! but it is not so in this case. (C. H. Spurgeon.)

“The marriage supper of the Lamb”

A distinction seems to be drawn between “the marriage,” and “the marriage supper” of the Lamb. “The marriage,” takes place now,--“The marriage supper” is to follow by and by. “The marriage” is that act of union between each soul and Christ, when that soul, drawn by God’s love and made willing by His grace, is linked to, and made one with, the mystical body of Christ. “The marriage supper” will be the public celebration, and the glorious consummation, of that union. Therefore there are differences. “The marriage” here, blessed and beautiful as it is, has its trouble and its separation. The soul has to leave, not without pain, what once was very dear to it. And some fear cannot help to mingle, even where love prevails. But at “the marriage supper” it will be all union, and no parting; and there will be no room for the shadow of a fear there. “The marriage” here is an individual act. One by one, each as God chooses, one here, and another there, a soul gives itself to Christ. “The marriage supper” will be the solemnity of the whole Church’s collective partnership, one and another, with Jesus. “The marriage” here, at least so it seems, sometimes, to the poor Christian’s heart, was capable of being dissolved again. But when “the marriage supper” comes, who will ever think of breaking the tie? In “the marriage” here, real and perfect though it be, there are intervals of distance; seasons, when there is no union between the soul and Him it loves. But in “the marriage supper,” the felt and visible presence of Christ will be for ever and for ever. In “the marriage” here there were many who, though truly and indissolubly joined to Christ, yet often seemed to others, and seemed to themselves, not to be His. But at “the marriage supper” there will be no misunderstandings. Christ will have proclaimed His own; and the whole universe will confess Him, and His saints. (James Vaughan, M. A.)

And he saith unto me, These are the true sayings of God.--

The Scriptures divinely true

I. A right estimate of holy scripture.

1. These words which we find in the Old and New Testaments are true. Free from error, certain, enduring, infallible.

2. These are Divine words. Infallibly inspired, so as to be in very truth “the sayings of God.”

3. These words are thus true and Divine in opposition to words of man. These may or may not be true. Pretended words of God. False prophets and men with addled intellects profess to speak in the name of God; but they lie.

4. These words are all of them truly Divine. Neither too severe to be true, nor too terrible to be uttered by a God of love, as some dare to say. Nor too good to be true, as tremblers fear. Nor too old to be true, as novelty-hunters affirm. Nor too simple to be truly Divine, as the worldly-wise insinuate.

5. These words are a blessing to us for that reason. What else can guide us if we have no sure revelation from God? How can we understand the revelation if it is not all true?

II. The result of forming such an estimate. If you believe that “these are the true sayings of God”--

1. You will listen to them with attention, and judge what you hear from preachers by this infallible standard.

2. You will receive these words with assurance. This will produce confidence of understanding. This will produce rest of heart.

3. You will submit with reverence to these words, obey their precepts, believe their teachings, and value their prophecies.

4. You will expect fulfilment of Divine promises under difficulties.

5. You will cling to revealed truth with pertinacity.

6. You will proclaim it with boldness.

III. Our justification for forming such an estimate.

1. The Scriptures are what they profess to be--the word of God.

2. There is a singular majesty and power in them; and we see this when the truth of God is preached.

3. There is a marvellous omniscience in Scripture, which is perceived by us when it unveils our inmost souls.

4. They have proven themselves true to us. They warned us of the bitter fruit of sin, and we have tasted it. They told us of the evil of the heart, and we have seen it. They told us of the peace-giving power of the blood, and we have proved it by faith in Jesus. They told us of the purifying energy of Divine grace: we are already instances of it, and desire to be more so. They assured us of the efficacy of prayer, and it is true. They assured us of the upholding power of faith in God, and by faith we have been upheld in trial. They assured us of the faithfulness of God to His people as shown in providence, and we have experienced it. All things have worked together for our good hitherto.

5. The witness of the Holy Spirit in our hearts confirms our faith in Holy Scripture. We believe, and are saved from sin by believing. Those words must be truly Divine which have wrought in us such gracious results. (C. H. Spurgeon.)

Worship God.--

The Supreme Being the only proper object of religious worship

I. The scripture represents God as the only proper object of religious worship.

II. The absolute supremacy of God in all His great and essential attributes.

1. God is supreme in respect to His existence.

2. God infinitely surpasses all other beings in the immensity of His presence.

3. God far transcends all other beings in His knowledge.

4. God is absolutely supreme in wisdom.

5. God is supreme in power.

6. God is supremely excellent in His holiness, goodness, or benevolence.

III. It is absurd to pay religious worship to any being who is not possessed of the essential attributes of divinity. (N. Emmons, D. D.)

The testimony of Jesus is the spirit of prophecy.

The great prophetic burden

I. The theme or burden of the bible is Jesus. Not philosophy, nor science, nor theology, nor metaphysics, nor morality, but Jesus.

II. The theme of bible-annals is Jesus. Not mere history, but history as containing Jesus. Not the mere rise and fall of nations and kingdoms, but these as connected with the promised seed of the woman.

III. The theme of the Psalms is Jesus. It is not mere poetry, Hebrew poetry, that we find in them, but Jesus. It is poetry embodying Jesus; it is praise, of which every note is Immanuel.

IV. The theme of prophecy is Jesus. It is not certain future events, dark or bright, presented to the view of the curious and speculative; it is Jesus; earthly events and hopes and fears only as linked with Him. (H. Bonar, D. D.)

The one witness and the one testimony

(with Revelation 22:20):--

I. The oneness of the testifier. He is the one God. The sender of the testimony is the one Jehovah; the subject of the testimony is the one Jesus; the inspirer is the one Spirit. Through many lips He has spoken, by many pens He has written; but it is the mind, the will, the purpose, the revelation of the one God that is here.

II. The oneness of the messenger. It is intimated here that it was one angel alone that was employed to communicate the testimony. He was sent to patriarchs and prophets of old, to apostles and brethren in later times. The instrument or medium of communication was a created being, an angel; but it was the same throughout.

III. The oneness of the testimony. It is not many testimonies, but one; it is the word (not words) of God. It was given at sundry times and divers manners; in fragments and portions, great and small; yet there is unity throughout, not discord or contradiction--marvellous unity, which can only be accounted for on the fact that there was in reality but one writer, He to whom one day is as a thousand years, and that therefore the truths enunciated are the offspring of one mind, the thoughts of one heart. This testimony bore all upon one point, one person, one work, one kingdom. It was the “testimony of Jesus,” that is, it testified of Him from first to last; for Christ is the all and in all of prophecy, the all and in all of the Bible. (H. Bonar, D. D.)

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Revelation 19:9". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/revelation-19.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And he saith unto me, write,.... What follows, because of the importance of it, and to show the certainty of it, and that it may be regarded and remembered: the person speaking is either the voice from the throne, Revelation 19:5 or the angel that attended John all along, and showed him this revelation, Revelation 1:1 or the angel that proposed to show him the judgment of the great whore, Revelation 17:1.

Blessed are they which are called to the marriage supper of the Lamb; by which is meant the Gospel ministry and ordinances, and communion in them, to which the Jews will be called to partake of in the latter day; these at the first of the Gospel dispensation are called a "dinner", to which, the Jews were invited, but refused to come, and now a "supper", because made in the evening of that dispensation; to which being called with an effectual calling, they will come and partake of it; on which account they are pronounced blessed, being the bride, the Lamb's wife, having on his righteousness, partaking of his benefits, and being called unto, and made meet for eternal glory and happiness; or else these may design converted Gentiles, who will be invited to join with them, and will.

And he saith unto me, these are the true sayings of God; the Syriac version reads, "these my true words are of God"; being true, it is plain they are of God, and being of God, it is certain they are true; for he is the God of truth, and cannot lie, and therefore may be depended upon.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Revelation 19:9". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/revelation-19.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

10 And he saith unto me, Write, Blessed [are] they which are called unto the marriage supper of the Lamb. And he saith unto me, These are the true sayings of God.

(10) Namely the angel, as it appears by the next verse.
Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Revelation 19:9". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/revelation-19.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

He — God by His angel saith unto me.

called — effectually, not merely externally. The “unto,” or into,” seems to express this: not merely invited to (Greek, “{(epi}”), but called INTO, so as to be partakers of (Greek, “{eis}”); compare 1 Corinthians 1:9.

marriage supperGreek,) “the supper of the marriage.” Typified by the Lord‘s Supper.

trueGreek, “genuine”; veritable sayings which shall surely be fulfilled, namely, all the previous revelations.

Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 19:9". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/revelation-19.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Write (ΓραπσονGrapson). First aorist active imperative of γραπωgraphō as in Revelation 1:11; Revelation 14:13. The speaker may be the angel guide of Revelation 17:1.

It is another beatitude (μακαριοιmakarioi Blessed) like that in Revelation 14:13 (fourth of the seven in the book).

They which are bidden (οι κεκλημενοιhoi keklēmenoi). Articular perfect passive participle of καλεωkaleō like Matthew 22:3; Luke 14:17. Cf. Revelation 17:14. This beatitude reminds us of that in Luke 14:15. (Cf. Matthew 8:11; Matthew 26:29.)

These are true words of God (ουτοι οι λογοι αλητινοι του τεου εισινHoutoi hoi logoi alēthinoi tou theou eisin). Undoubtedly, but one should bear in mind that apocalyptic symbolism “has its own methods and laws of interpretation, and by these the student must be guided” (Swete).

Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Revelation 19:9". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/revelation-19.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And he saith unto me, Write, Blessed are they which are called unto the marriage supper of the Lamb. And he saith unto me, These are the true sayings of God.

And he — The angel, saith to me, Write - St. John seems to have been so amazed at these glorious sights, that he needeth to be reminded of this.

Happy are they who are invited to the marriage supper of the Lamb — Called to glory.

And he saith — After a little pause.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Revelation 19:9". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/revelation-19.html. 1765.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Called unto the marriage supper; called to share in the rejoicing.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Revelation 19:9". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/revelation-19.html. 1878.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

9 And he saith unto me, Write, Blessed are they which are called unto the marriage supper of the Lamb. And he saith unto me, These are the true sayings of God.

Ver. 9. Write] To wit, this ensuing sentence, for the use of posterity, worthy to be written in letters of gold.

Blessed are they that are called] So they have hearts to come at Christ’s call, and not show themselves unworthy to taste of his supper by framing excuses, as those recusant guests did, Luke 14:15-24.

These are the true sayings of God] q.d. This foregoing sentence is "a faithful saying, and worthy of all acceptation," 1 Timothy 1:15.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Revelation 19:9". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/revelation-19.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Revelation 19:9

I. A distinction seems to be drawn between "the marriage" and the "marriage supper" of the Lamb. "The marriage" takes place now; "the marriage supper" is to follow by-and-by. "The marriage" is that act of union between each soul and Christ when the soul, drawn by God's love and made willing by His grace, is linked to, and made one with, the mystical body of Christ; "the marriage supper" will be the public celebration and the glorious consummation of that union. Therefore there are differences. "The marriage" here, blessed and beautiful as it is, has its trouble and its separation. The soul has to leave, not without pain, what once was very dear to it. And some fear cannot help to mingle even where love prevails. But at the "marriage supper" it will be all union, and no parting; and there will be no room for the shadow of a fear there.

II. "The marriage" here is an individual act. One by one, each as God chooses, one here and another there, souls give themselves to Christ. "The marriage supper" will be the solemnity of the whole Church's collective partnership, one and another, with Jesus. "The marriage" here—at least, so it seems sometimes to the poor Christian's heart—is capable of being dissolved again; but when the "marriage supper" comes, who will ever think of breaking the tie? In "the marriage" here, real and perfect though it be, there are intervals of distance, seasons when there is no union between the soul and Him it loves; but in the "marriage supper" the felt and visible presence of Christ will be for ever and for ever. In "the marriage" here there were many who, though truly and indissolubly joined to Christ, yet often seemed to others and seemed to themselves not to be His. The world did not acknowledge them; the Church did not acknowledge them; they did not acknowledge their own selves. But at "the" marriage supper" there will be no misunderstandings. Christ will have proclaimed His own, and the whole universe will confess Him and His saints.

J. Vaughan, Fifty Sermons, 1874, p. 289.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Revelation 19:9". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/revelation-19.html.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Blessed are they which are called to the marriage-supper of the Lamb; that is, (say they, who understand, by the marriage of the Lamb, the conversion of the Jews,) who shall live in the happy time, when the Jews being converted shall with the Gentiles make up one glorious gospel church. But the marriage is one thing, and the marriage-supper another; the marriage-supper follows the marriage; so that the kingdom of glory rather seems here intended: blessed are they which are called to it, being made meet and prepared for it, by grace here, and glory hereafter: we must be made meet for heaven before we can be admitted into heaven. Blessed are they which are called to the marriage-supper of the Lamb.

Observe next, That St. John being overjoyed at the good news of his countrymen's (the Jews') conversion, fell down at the angel's feet to worship him, as Cornelius did at St. Peter's, when he heard of the conversion of the Gentiles, And I fell at his feet to worship him. Acts 10:25. The holiest and best of saints are not wholly free from passionate infirmities: he would now have worshipped this angel, yet we read not of any attempt made to worship any of the former angels which conversed with him. This makes it probable that he apprehended it to be an uncreated angel, even the Son of God, which now talked with him.

Observe next, With what indignation this holy angel rejected the offer of religious adoration, and how peremptorily he forbids it: Ora mey By no means, upon no terms do it, See thou do it not.

The church of Rome asks us, Why we reprove them for worshipping the angels, when St. John himself did it? Our answer is ready, That St. John himself was reproved for it: the angel rejected it as none of his due.

O the presumption of those men, who dare do that which the angel expressly forbids to be done! Yet, after all, Bellarmine says, That St. John did well to worship the angel; then, say we, the angel did ill to reprove St. John; but whether we shall believe a cardinal at Rome, or an angel of God, judge ye.

Observe lastly, The reasons assigned by the angel who forbade it.

1. Because God, and God alone, is the sole and proper object of religious worship: Worship thou God.

2. Because the angel was St. John's equal in office, though not in nature: I am thy fellow-servant.

As if he had said, "Those who serve and worship God together with you, must not be worshipped by you: those who are fellow-servants to one master, should not give to one another that worship which is only due to their Lord and Master. But we are fellow-servants; how doth that appear? Thus: you have the testimony of Jesus, and I have the spirit of prophecy.

Now the spirit of prophecy, and the work of the ministry in testifying of Jesus, being of the same nature and kind of service, therefore from those that are employed in one of them, religious worship is not due to the other. It is Christ that employs us both, and therefore he alone is to be worshipped, and neither I nor thou: Worship God, to whom religious worship is justly and peculiarly due."

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Revelation 19:9". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/revelation-19.html. 1700-1703.

Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae

DISCOURSE: 2524

THE MARRIAGE-SUPPER OF THE LAMB

Revelation 19:9. Write, Blessed are they which are called unto the marriage-supper of the Lamb. And he saith unto me, These are the true sayings of God.

THE period referred to seems to be that of the millennium; preparatory to which, we are well assured, the popish power will be destroyed. That is the power which, in the book of Revelation, is designated the harlot, the whore of Babylon; and her destruction is that which is predicted in the preceding context. The frequent repetition of the word “Alleluia,” (which is a Hebrew word,) in the preceding verses, has given occasion to commentators to suppose, that the destruction of popery will, in a pre-eminent degree, attract the attention of the Jews, and dispose them to embrace the faith of Christ. However this may be, it will certainly be a signal to the world at large for their uniting themselves unto the Lord: and then will come what is here called “The marriage-supper of the Lamb;” and a very extraordinary degree of happiness will be poured out upon all the guests that are partakers of it,

Let us consider,

I. What is the feast here spoken of—

It is called, “The marriage-supper of the Lamb.” Now,

The Lord Jesus Christ is the Husband of his Church—

[This is frequently declared in the Holy Scriptures. The Prophet Isaiah says, “Thy Maker is thine husband [Note: Isaiah 54:5.]:” and David enters very particularly into the subject, drawing a parallel between the union of men with their female captives, and the union which takes place between the Lord Jesus Christ and his believing people. The captive maidens were to be allowed a month to forget their friends and relatives. And thus believers are first taken captive by the power of the Lord Jesus; and then, having forgotten all former bonds, they are to be united unto him for ever [Note: Isaiah 45:10-11.]. In the New Testament the same idea is frequently suggested. St. Paul speaks of believers being “presented as a chaste virgin to Christ [Note: 2 Corinthians 11:2.]:” and, in another place, after opening fully the duties of husbands and wives, he says, “I speak concerning Christ and his Church [Note: Ephesians 5:32.].”]

On occasion of his union with her, he gives a feast to all who shall accept his gracious invitations—

[The Church, collectively, is “the Lamb’s bride:” but individual believers are the guests invited to the marriage-feast. On the conversion of any soul, there is a joy diffused throughout all the angelic hosts [Note: Luke 15:10.]: and, in like manner, the union of any soul with Christ should be regarded as a signal for joy amongst all who “love the Lord Jesus Christ in sincerity.” On every such occasion is there, as it were, a feast prepared; and guests are invited to partake of it. It is an occasion worthy of a feast: for then all the purposes of God respecting that soul are, in great measure, accomplished. As far as relates to that soul, the Redeemer himself receives the recompence of all that he has done and suffered for us; yea, “he sees of the travail of his own soul, and is satisfied.” The soul was indeed “given unto Christ” from all eternity, and in that respect may be considered as “betrothed unto him.” But, when the soul surrenders up itself to Christ, and is united unto him by faith, then does it “become one spirit with Christ [Note: 1 Corinthians 6:17.],” and partakes of all that Christ himself possesses. Now, if among men an union of any person with his bride is judged worthy of feasting and congratulation amongst all their friends, much more may the union before contemplated, even that of a believing soul and the Lord Jesus Christ, be fitly considered as a ground of most exalted joy.]

But that which the text speaks of, is not so much the feast, as,

II. The blessedness of all who partake of it—

Many reasons may be assigned why the guests at such a feast should be happy:

1. They have the felicity of seeing the Bridegroom, and of hearing his voice—

[St. John tells us how highly he himself estemed this privilege: “He that hath the bride is the bridegroom: but the friend of the bridegroom, which standeth and heareth him, rejoiceth greatly because of the bridegroom’s voice: this my joy therefore is fulfilled [Note: John 3:29.].” And who can tell what it is to have such communion with him, unless he have first himself been admitted to it? Who but the believer can comprehend aright that declaration of St. John, “Truly our fellowship is with the Father, and with his Son Jesus Christ [Note: 1 John 1:3.]?” Verily this is “a joy with which the stranger intermeddleth not;” it is “unspeakable and glorified [Note: 1 Peter 1:8.];” even an earnest of heaven itself.]

2. They partake of the highest enjoyment of which, in this fallen state, their souls are capable—

[The terms in which the feast itself is described may give us some idea of this: it is “a feast of fat things, a feast of wines on the lees, of fat things full of marrow, of wines on the lees well refined [Note: Isaiah 25:7.].” But hear the testimony of a guest: “Thou preparest a table before me in the presence of mine enemies: thou anointest my head with oil: my cup runneth over [Note: Psalms 23:5.].” Hear another testimony: “I sat down under his shadow with great delight, and his fruit was sweet unto my taste. He brought me to the banqueting-house, and his banner over me was love [Note: Song of Solomon 2:3-4].” But why should we attend to individuals? However strongly they may express themselves, they can never convey to us any adequate idea of their bliss: for we are expressly told, that “eye hath not seen, nor ear heard, neither have entered into the heart of man, the things which God hath prepared for them that love him [Note: 1 Corinthians 2:9.].”]

3. The blessedness which they begin to taste on earth shall be perfected and continued to all eternity in heaven—

[There shall the table be spread again, and every believer be admitted to it. There are Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, feasting before the Lord: there is Lazarus sitting next to Abraham himself: and there shall all true believers sit down with them: and the viands, of which they here obtained a taste, shall, with infinitely augmented zest, be partaken of by them to the full, through all eternity. But who shall paint the blessedness of that state? If even here the believer’s joy is “unspeakable,” what shall it there be? But we must be content to wait for our summons there: for, in attempting to describe that bliss, we only “darken counsel by words without knowledge.”]

Address—

1. Those who are disposed to decline the invitation given them—

[You make excuses, which you now judge sufficient to justify your contempt of the mercy shewn you — — — But your “making light of it” is viewed with other eyes by the heavenly Bridegroom. He feels that you are offering to him the greatest indignity: and he declares, that “you shall never taste of his supper,” but shall be for ever excluded from it, and be left in outer darkness to bewail your fate. O! who can declare what your feelings will then be? and what weeping, and wailing, and gnashing of teeth, will be your portion for evermore? Bring not on yourselves, my dear brethren, this awful judgment. I am sent, not only to invite, but to “compel you to come in.” O that I knew how to address you, so that I might at last prevail! “Wherefore do you spend your money for that which is not bread, and your labour for that which satisfieth not? Hearken diligently unto me, and eat ye that which is good; and let your souls delight themselves in fatness [Note: Isaiah 55:2.].”]

2. Those who are willing to accept it—

[Come without delay, lest the door should be closed, and your exclusion be for ever sealed. If you say, “I am afraid to come, because I do not possess a wedding-garment;” I answer, The Bridegroom himself has provided garments for all his guests; and if only you seek one from him, it shall not be withheld. Not only will he put upon you that justifying righteousness which he himself wrought out for you by his obedience unto death, but he will “make you all glorious within,” and render you fully meet for the enjoyment of his presence, and the everlasting possession of his glory.

It may seem, perhaps, that we are speaking more than we are authorized to declare. But indeed it is not so: for “these are the true sayings of God,” as my text informs you: and you shall find them true, if you will accept the invitation now sent you, and cast yourselves on him, in a firm reliance on his word. “Faithful is He that calleth you; who also will do it.” Only come to him “strong in faith;” and you may rest assured that “not one good thing shall fail you, of all that he has ever promised.”]

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Simeon, Charles. "Commentary on Revelation 19:9". Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/shh/revelation-19.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Revelation 19:9. γράψον) The Apparatus makes mention of the MSS. which omit this word. Among them are the first editions of Erasmus, which Luther followed: whence the suspicion of a typographical error in the German Bibles is removed. The more recent editors of the German Bibles have inserted that word.— ἀληθινοὶ, true) A remarkable epithet. It is used by itself in this one passage only of the Apocalypse, as πιστὸς, faithful, of the Witness, ch. Revelation 1:5. In other places both are joined. The faithful and true witness, ch. Revelation 3:14 Faithful and true, put absolutely, ch. Revelation 19:11. Then, Faithful and true words, ch. Revelation 21:5, Revelation 22:6. In other places another epithet is added. Jesus, Holy and true, ch. Revelation 3:7. God, the Lord Holy and true, ch. Revelation 6:10. Just and true are the ways of God: true and just are His judgments, ch. Revelation 15:3, Revelation 16:7, Revelation 19:2. Where these epithets are used conjointly, God is called Holy, with reference to Himself: faithful and just, with reference to His people, and in the word given to His people: He is called true, in His work, the issue of which, especially in this place, answers to the word which has preceded. Where one epithet only is used, as Faithful, at the beginning of the book, and True, here, about the end, the force of the other is to be understood. And as He Himself is, so are His words, and ways, and judgments.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Revelation 19:9". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/revelation-19.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

And he saith unto me, Write; write it, as a business of moment, of which a record is fit to be kept.

Blessed are they which are called to the marriage supper of the Lamb; that is, (say those who understand by the marriage of the Lamb the Jews’ conversion), who live in this happy period of time when the Jews shall be converted, and with the Gentiles make one gospel church. But this seems to me not sufficient. The marriage is one thing, the supper another, and (ordinarily) consequential to the marriage itself. The kingdom of glory seems to me rather intended, and those are called to it, who are made meet for the inheritance of the saints in light.

These are the true sayings of God; that is, these are the undoubted truths of God, and therefore to be called into question by none.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Revelation 19:9". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/revelation-19.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

блаженны См. пояснение к 1:3.

званые Это не Невеста (Церковь), а гости. Невеста не является приглашенной, она приглашает. Это те, кто был спасен до дня Пятидесятницы (Троицы), т.е. все истинные верующие, спасенные милостью Божией по вере еще до рождения Церкви (Деян. 2:1 и послед.). Хотя они не Невеста, они прославлены и господствуют со Христом в Тысячелетнем Царстве. На самом деле это скорее непохожий образ, а не непохожая реальность. Среди гостей также будут святые от годины искушения и живые верующие, обладающие земными телами, живущие в Царстве. Церковь – это Невеста, чистая и истинная, а не блудница, какой был Израиль (см. Ос. 2). Церковь будет Невестой во время брачного пира на небесах, а затем придет на землю, на праздник последней вечери (Миллениум). После этого события наступает новый порядок, и брак завершается (см. пояснение к 21:1, 2).

истинные слова Божии Это относится ко всему сказанному, начиная с 17:1. Все это истина: брак состоится после суда.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Revelation 19:9". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/revelation-19.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

They which are called unto the marriage-supper; as the bride represents the faithful people of God taken as a whole, so they which are called to the marriage-supper represent the faithful servants of Christ considered individually.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Revelation 19:9". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/revelation-19.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And he saith unto me, Write, Blessed are they that are bidden to the marriage supper of the Lamb. And he saith unto me, These are the true words of God.

Blessed are they that are bidden ... All people are bidden in the sense of being invited by the gospel of Christ to accept the salvation of God; but, in the New Testament, the "called" means those who "have accepted and obeyed the call." "Bidden" means those who accepted God's invitation through their believing and obeying the gospel.

These are the true words of God ... This may be understood as a solemn assurance that "all of the Scriptures" are the true words of God. There is no need to limit this to the invitation to the marriage supper; but that in itself encompasses the entire scope of God's message to people in the Holy Scriptures.

Copyright Statement
Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Revelation 19:9". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/revelation-19.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘And he says to me, “These are the true words of God”.’

The angel emphasises the truth of all that John has seen. The seven visions have been given and now they receive heavenly ratification. This is introduced now so that no attention is taken from the final Coming of the Word of God (Revelation 19:11 on).

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Revelation 19:9". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/revelation-19.html. 2013.

Foy E. Wallace's Commentary on the Book of Revelation

The angelic admonition in verse nine for John to write was addressed personally to him, by the voice from the throne, not by an angel, and indicated the distinguished honor of being' the recipient of the revelation of these things of such tremendous significance.

Having unfolded the visions in two parts, the closing scene of the second part put the emphasis on the state of blessed union with Christ of all who had overcome the trials and tribulations attending the fall of the harlot Babylon. Angels could have no higher or holier relation. The epilogue, these are the true sayings of God, meant that they were not mere words of John in visional narration, or of the angels; but they were the very words of God to the Seer; the directly inspired words of God.

In this connection it was twice repeated that, He saith unto me. The equivalent of these words occurs several hundred times in the Old Testament, and is repeatedly affirmed in the New Testament. The positive affirmation of this verbal inspiration is affirmed throughout all the scriptures; but has been marred and mutilated by the sacrilegious pseudo-translations of the perverted new versions. They have been advertised as new translations, but they are in fact no translations. They ruin Revelation as they do all other portions of the verbally inspired word of God.

The words of the angel had impressed John as a message direct from God; and verse ten stated that he fell at his feet to worship him. In bodily prostration John was about to worship the angel. But the angel refused the homage, saying, See thou do it not: I am a fellowservant, and of thy brethren that have the testimony of Jesus: worship God. This testimony of Jesus had reference to the message of Revelation; and being a fellow servant with thy brethren was an expression of humility as expressed by John himself in chapter 1:9.

Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition available at BibleSupport.com. Public Domain.
Bibliographical Information
Wallace, Foy E. "Commentary on Revelation 19:9". "Foy E. Wallace's Commentary on the Book of Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/foy/revelation-19.html. 1966.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The person who now spoke to John appears to be the same angel who had been guiding him thorough the revelation concerning Babylon (cf. Revelation 17:1; Revelation 17:15). He instructed John to write again (cf. Revelation 1:11; Revelation 1:19; Revelation 14:13; Revelation 21:5), this time another beatitude (cf. Revelation 14:3). This blessing gives Tribulation saints an additional motivation to remain faithful. Those invited to the Lamb"s marriage supper include His friends as well as the bride (cf. Revelation 3:20). This implies the presence of other believers besides church saints at this celebration. Those invited to the supper will include the bride and other believers who are not members of the church. These other believers would be Tribulation martyrs and believers who will live through the Tribulation and enter the Millennium alive (cf. Revelation 12:13-17; Revelation 20:4-5; Matthew 22:11-14; Matthew 25:1-13). They may also include Old Testament saints who will experience resurrection at the beginning of the Millennium (cf. Isaiah 26:19; Daniel 12:2).

The angel concluded with the final sentence, "These are true words of God" (cf. Revelation 22:6; Revelation 22:8-9). He could have been referring to what we read in the first part of this verse. [Note: Hughes, p201.] However since this statement concludes all that this angel had revealed since Revelation 17:1, it seems better to take it as referring to all the intervening revelation. [Note: Dsterdieck, p454; Alford, 4:725.]

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 19:9". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/revelation-19.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Revelation 19:9. And he saith unto me, Write, Blessed are they that are bidden unto the marriage supper of the Lamb. We are not distinctly informed who the person here spoken of is; but, inasmuch as we seem to be still dealing with the ‘strong angel’ of chap. Revelation 18:21, we are probably to think of him. Alter the marriage comes the marriage supper, the fulness of blessing to be enjoyed by the redeemed. It may be a question whether we are to distinguish between the bride herself and those who appear rather to be spoken of as guests at the marriage supper. But the analogy of Scripture, and especially of such passages as Matthew 22:2; Matthew 26:29, leads to the conclusion that no such distinction can be drawn. Those who are faithful in the Lord are at once the Lamb’s bride, and the Lamb’s guests. Any difficulty of interpretation arises simply from the difficulty, so often met with, of representing under one figure the varied relations between the Lord and His people. By the Lamb’s wife, too, we must surely understand the whole believing Church, and not any separate section of it distinguished from, and more highly favoured than, the rest. As there is one Bridegroom so there is one bride. If, therefore, according to the opinion of many, we are dealing here with the 144,000 of chap. 14, an additional proof will be afforded that in that mystical number the whole company of believers was included.

And he said unto me, These are the true words of God. The word ‘These’ refers, not to all that has been revealed since chap. Revelation 17:1, but to the last revelations made; and they are ‘true,’ expressive of the great realities now taking place.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Revelation 19:9". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/revelation-19.html. 1879-90.

Gary Hampton Commentary on Selected Books

Those "called" would be those who accepted the call since the gospel is for all. (Romans 1:16; Matthew 11:28-30)

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Hampton, Gary. "Commentary on Revelation 19:9". "Gary Hampton Commentary on Selected Books". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ghc/revelation-19.html. 2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

unto = to.

Blessed. Greek. makarios. The fourth of the seven occurrences of "Blessed" in Rev., and the forty-seventh in N.T. See Matthew 5:3.

called . . . Lamb. See Psalms 45:14 for some of the "called" there indicated.

unto. App-104.

supper. Greek. deipnon. First occurrence Matthew 23:6. Here equivalent to the marriage feast of Revelation 19:7.

unto = to.

true. App-175.

sayings. App-121.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Revelation 19:9". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/revelation-19.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And he saith unto me, Write, Blessed are they which are called unto the marriage supper of the Lamb. And he saith unto me, These are the true sayings of God. He - God by His angel saith unto me.

Called - effectually. The "unto" [ eis (Greek #1519)], 'into,' expresses this: not merely invited to [ epi (Greek #1909)], but made partakers of (cf. 1 Corinthians 1:9).

Marriage supper - `the supper of the marriage.' Typified by the Lord's supper.

True, [ aleethinoi (Greek #228)] - 'genuine;' veritable; which shall surely be fulfilled-namely, all the previous revelations.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 19:9". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/revelation-19.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(9) And he saith unto me . . .—Who is the speaker? The general and simplest opinion is that it is the angel mentioned in Revelation 17:1 who speaks. The speaker bids the seer write: “Blessed are they who are bidden to the supper of the marriage of the Lamb.” This is one of the six benedictions of the Apocalypse (Rev. Revelation 1:3; Revelation 14:13; Revelation 20:6; Revelation 22:7; Revelation 22:14): it is founded on our Lord’s parables (Matthew 22:1; Matthew 25:1; comp. also Revelation 3:20): the blessing of the call to the marriage supper is more clearly realised now that the day of joy is at hand. We must not draw too sharp distinctions, as some have done, between the bride and the guests: the imagery is varied to give fulness and force to the truths which no emblems can adequately express. The Church of Christ will rest, and feast, and reign with her Lord; and in all the peace, gladness, and triumph of that joy-time God’s servants will share. A solemn confirmation of this follows, as in Revelation 21:5; Revelation 22:6 : “these words are true (sayings) of God.”

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Revelation 19:9". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/revelation-19.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And he saith unto me, Write, Blessed are they which are called unto the marriage supper of the Lamb. And he saith unto me, These are the true sayings of God.
Write
1:19; 2:1,8,12,18; 3:1,7,14; 10:4; 14:13; Isaiah 8:1; Habakkuk 2:2
Blessed
7,8; 3:20; Matthew 22:2-4; Luke 14:15,16
These
11; 21:5; 22:6; 1 Timothy 1:15; 4:9; 2 Timothy 2:11; Titus 3:8
Reciprocal: Genesis 29:22 - and made;  Judges 14:10 - made there;  Esther 2:18 - made a great;  Isaiah 25:6 - make;  Daniel 8:17 - I was;  Daniel 10:1 - and the;  Zechariah 1:9 - the angel;  Matthew 5:3 - Blessed;  Matthew 9:15 - Can;  Luke 22:16 - until;  Luke 22:30 - eat;  John 1:29 - Behold;  Acts 2:39 - as many;  Romans 8:30 - Moreover;  Romans 9:24 - whom;  Revelation 1:11 - What

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Revelation 19:9". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/revelation-19.html.

Walter Scott's Commentary on Revelation

GUESTS AT THE MARRIAGE SUPPER.

Revelation 19:9. — "Write, Blessed are they who are called to the supper of the marriage of the Lamb." The bride and guests are clearly distinguished. The former is, of course, in more immediate relation to the Lamb. The bride is wed; the guests sup.

The angel, addressing the Seer, says, "Write." This command, frequently repeated during the progress of the visions, marks the importance and speciality of the communication. "Blessed" are those called to the supper. This is not said of the bride. Her blessing, which is that of the highest order and character, is expressed in the simple words, bride and wife. What unspeakable joy is conveyed in these terms! But the guests are pronounced blessed. Who are they? We answer, the friends of the Bridegroom. But as the friends of the Bridegroom they enjoy a higher and dearer character of blessedness than they would if merely the friends of the bride. John the Baptist expressly tells us that he is a friend of the Bridegroom (John 3:29). The Baptist was martyred before the Church was formed, hence he comes in as perhaps the most honoured of the guests at the marriage supper. Old Testament saints constitute the large company of called guests, each one being a friend of the Bridegroom, and rejoicing in His presence and voice. The apocalyptic martyrs are not raised till after the marriage, hence cannot be numbered amongst the guests. Angels may be spectators of the scene, but guests they cannot be. Angels are never spoken of in the way that these are. It is called a supper, perhaps in contrast to the subsequent supper of judgment (v. 17). The former is in connection with the Lamb and His joy; the latter is in relation to God and the judgment He executes on the ungodly — administratively by the Lamb and His heavenly saints.

CERTAINTY.

9. — These divine communications, whether spoken by an angel or seen in vision by John, have attached to them all the weight and authority of God Himself. "These are the true words of God."{*"Are the very truth of God, and shall veritably come to pass." — Alford.} The basis of our faith is not conjecture, but the certainty that God has spoken. The truths thus divinely authenticated are those stated within the first nine verses of the chapter. Absolute certainty is of prime importance in these days when the dogmatism of belief in a divine revelation is considered to savour of a narrow and illiberal spirit. In old times God spake in the prophets; in New Testament times God has spoken in His Son (Hebrews 1:1-2, R.V.). How blessed, therefore, to have the confirmation of these grand and heart-gladdening truths from God Himself!

Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition available at BibleSupport.com. Public Domain.
Bibliographical Information
Scott, Walter. "Commentary on Revelation 19:9". "Walter Scott's Commentary on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sor/revelation-19.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

This will be one marriage and accompanying "refreshments" at which there will be no human guests but the bride. Hence the blessing pronounced on those who are called to the supper, means in reality the people should become a part of the espoused bride by becoming Christians. Before going further in the comments it will be well to make some explanatory remarks as t-0 the "hour of the ceremony." Verse7 says the marriage is come, when we know we will find that the work of the Reformation is to be gone over again by the vision. There will be no difficulty if the reader recalls that the book has more than once departed from the chronological order of events to take up some other period of the Christian Dispensation. Hence these preceding verses brought us down to the last day and announced the final marriage of Christ to his bride (the church). The vision will now take up some principles of a general character, then bring us again to the work just preceding the Reformation.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on Revelation 19:9". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/revelation-19.html. 1952.

Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation

Revelation 19:9

Revelation 19:9 And he saith unto me, Write, Blessed are they which are called unto the marriage supper of the Lamb. And he saith unto me, These are the true sayings of God.

And he saith unto me, write, blessed are they which are called unto the marriage supper of the Lamb.

Hebrews, that Isaiah, the Angel of God: Me, that Isaiah,, John, write: For

these are the true sayings of God

By the marriage supper of the Lamb, we are to understand Christ's and the wife virgin's wedding. { Matthew 25:1-13} And they that were ready went in with him to the marriage. See my exposition of the parable of the Ten Virgins, 1674.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Knollys, Hanserd. "Commentary on Revelation 19:9". "Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hkc/revelation-19.html.

Harold Norris' Commentary on the Book of Revelation

ONE OF THE BEATITUDSE OF REVELATION

4.

"Blessed are those who are invited to the marriage supper of the Lamb" ( Revelation 19:9). To be left out of the list of invitations to a wedding is a sting most people have felt at one time or another. Here John pictures the greatest privilege of all.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Revelation 19:9. And he says to me, Write, Blessed are they that are called to the marriage feast of the Lamb. And he says to me, These words are true, (they are the words) of God.[Note: From the parallel passage, ch. 22:6, we are inclined to give the preference to the reading οὗτοι οἱ λόγοι ἀληθινοὶ εἰσι τοῦ θεοῦ. The true is here, as there, a predicate. To the second predicate there, πιστοί corresponds here the τοῦ θεοῦ, these as sayings are true (they are the sayings) of God. The reading: οὗτοι οἱ λόγοι ἀληθινοὶ τοῦ θεοῦ εἰσιν; seems to possess the character of a kind of solution. That the τοῦ θεοῦ here lakes the place of πιστοί in ch. 22:6, is plain also from the observation of Bengel, that the ἀληθινό ς in the Revelation is only here put alone, always elsewhere in connection with πιστό ς (comp. 3:14, 19:11, 21:5), or some other epithet. The passage, too, ch. 22:5, serves as a confirmation of the reading we prefer; it shews that the article was shoved in before ἀληθινοὶ by the copyists: καὶ λέ γει μου· γρά ψον ὅ τι οὖ τοι οἱ λό γοι πιστοὶ καὶ ἀ ληθινοί εἰ σι. This passage and ch. 22:6 are of more importance in determining the right reading here, as the three passages are very closely related.]That the speaker is an angel, appears from Revelation 19:10. We can think only of the angel mentioned in ch. Revelation 17:1. For since then no other angel has spoken to John; and it is the same also, who in ch. Revelation 21:9 shews him the bride, the Lamb's wife. In regard to the special commission to write, see on ch. Revelation 14:13. The blessedness pronounced on those, who are invited, carries in its bosom a woe to such as are not (comp. Luke 14:24 with Luke 14:14; Matthew 25:12); so that the words, "blessed are they," etc. contain a stringent admonition to put away with fear and trembling whatever might stand in the way of the admonition.

The church is the bride; its individual members appear here, after the example of Matthew 22:1, ss., Matthew 25:10, comp. Matthew 9:15, as the guests, who are bidden to the marriage feast, and are thus admitted to a participation in the joy of the wedding.

The declaration, "Blessed are they who are called to the marriage feast of the Lamb," corresponds to that in ch. Revelation 14:13, "Blessed are the dead, that die in the Lord from henceforth." There the blessedness has respect to the blessedness of heaven. The "from henceforth" forms the contrast to the completion of God's kingdom; even now, not afterwards merely in the new Jerusalem. Here we have the second stage of blessedness.

By the second "and he says to me" what follows is intentionally cut off from what immediately precedes.

The expression, "these words," or sayings, can only refer to Revelation 19:5-8. For the plural alone decides against the reference to the "Blessed are they," etc. The announcement, also, of the marriage of the Lamb is given there too indirectly; and the benediction by itself needs no confirmation. The things meant are the great and consolatory truths of the coming of the Lord's kingdom, of the marriage of the Lamb, of the suitable preparation of the bride and her appearance in the bright and pure linen-attire of righteousness. These truths have been communicated in the form of a song of praise by the church of the just made perfect. But this was only the visionary form, is plainly indicated by the expression, "as a voice," in Revelation 19:6. Substantially, they were the sayings of God, or the divine revelations, which had been imparted to the prophet by the mediation of the angel—comp. on ch. Revelation 1:1.

The emphatic assurance given of the truth and credibility of what was spoken implies that here great and glorious things are referred to, which run counter to sight and reason. When the church lies prostrate on the ground, and the world triumphs, it is indeed hard to believe that the glory of God is yet to find its absolute realization. When Christ seems to have altogether cast off his church, the whole authority of God is needed to fill it with joyful thoughts of a wedding-season. And when it is obliged to utter the complaint, Ah! my sin is ever before me! it can only believe on God's sure word of promise what is said here of being made ready.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on Revelation 19:9". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/revelation-19.html.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

9.He—Who? The last-mentioned antecedent is, Revelation 17:1, “one of the seven angels that had the seven vials.” And in Revelation 17:7, the same “angel said” all the rest of that chapter. And the same angel reappears after the millennium and after the final judgment, (Revelation 21:9,) and shows the bride the Lamb’s wife, namely, the New Jerusalem, the description extends to the end of that chapter. And the next and final Revelation 22:1, commences with, “And he showed me,” etc., referring to the same angel. Then, in Revelation 19:6 of that chapter, he evidently refers to the same angel-guide. Two remarkable points here present themselves. First, this same angel-guide crosses, officially, over the thousand years of chapter 20. Of course, in the panorama visible to the seer, the thousand years could not be optically presented, and could only be narrated. The continuity of the angel is, therefore, only the convenient continuity of the panorama. And as the seven-vial angels were contents of the seventh trumpet, so the proper inference is, that the peal of the seventh trumpet continues from the beginning of the twelfth chapter to the end of the Apocalypse; that is, from the first advent to the end of the millennium, and the opening of eternity. Second, the parallelism shown in our note on Revelation 17:3, between Revelation 17:1; Revelation 17:3, and Revelation 21:9-10, shows not only that there is an intended contrast between the harlot, or old Babylon, and the wife, or New Jerusalem, but indicates that the immediacy of the marriage of the Lamb, indicated in Revelation 19:7 of this nineteenth chapter, is also very much a panoramic immediacy, and that it crosses over the millennium and reaches to the descending of the celestial city, which is the true wife. Hence it clearly follows, that the said immediacy does not prove a real nearness of the second advent and judgment. That is, the scene of Revelation 19:11-21 of this chapter is not Christ’s personal, literal, judgment-advent.

Write, Blessed—Here is a blessedness, as in Revelation 14:13, worthy of record while the world stands.

Called—A call resulting from the justifying faith of the invited guest. The same hand that seals the pardon of the sinner writes his name in the book of life, and calls him to share at the marriage supper. Stuart supposes it to be a great difficulty that the saints of last verse, who really constitute the bride, are here only invited guests. But while collectively the body of saints is the bride, yet individually each saint may be viewed as guest.

True—Both genuine, as being truly God’s sayings, and true as uttering what is truth.

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Revelation 19:9". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/revelation-19.html. 1874-1909.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Revelation 19:9. The saints are the Bride, but—by a confusion inevitable when the the two cognate figures, apocalyptic and synoptic (Matthew 22:2 f.), are combined—they are also the guests at the wedding. (The bliss of the next world is termed “the Banquet” in rabbinic writings, which interpret Exodus 24:11 as though the sight of God were meat and drink to the beholders). Like the Greek , the church is composed of members who are ideally distinguishable from her, just as in En. xxxviii. 1 the congregation of the righteous is equivalent to the new Jerusalem. With the idea of 7–9, cf. Pirke Aboth, iv. 23: This world is like a vestibule before the world to come; prepare thyself at the vestibule that thou mayest be admitted into the .— . either “real” as opposed to fanciful and delusive revelations, or (if . = ) “trustworthy words of God” (Daniel 2:9) emphasising the previous beatitude (like , Revelation 14:13). Originally the words (see above) gravely corroborated all the preceding threats and promises (cf.Revelation 17:17), despite their occasionally strange and doubtful look. It is a common reiteration in apocc. (cf. reff.), underlining as it were the solemn statements of a given passage. See, e.g., Herm. Vis. iii. 4, “that God’s name may be glorified, hath this been revealed to thee, for the sake of those who are of doubtful mind, questioning in their hearts whether this is so or not. Tell them it is all true, that there is nothing but truth in it, that all is sure and valid and founded”. In Sanhed. Jerus. Rabbi Jochanan declares, with reference to Daniel 10:1, that a true word is one which has been already revealed by God to the council of the heavenly host.

 

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Revelation 19:9". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/revelation-19.html. 1897-1910.