Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Revelation 22:8

I, John, am the one who heard and saw these things. And when I heard and saw, I fell down to worship at the feet of the angel who showed me these things.
New American Standard

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Angel (a Spirit);   Homage;   Prophets;   Readings, Select;   Word of God;   Worship;   Thompson Chain Reference - Future, the;   Heaven;   Heavenly;   Home;   Living Water;   Water;   Water of Life;   Wells;   The Topic Concordance - Coming of the Lord Jesus Christ;   Worship;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Idolatry;   Prophets;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Angel;   Image;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Angels;   John the apostle;   Worship;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Apocalyptic;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Obedience;   CARM Theological Dictionary - Heaven;   Hell;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Worship;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Incense;   Revelation of John, the;   Holman Bible Dictionary - John;   Revelation, the Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Adoration;   Angel;   Ethics;   Revelation, Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Feet;   Gestures;   Grace;   Pre-Eminence ;   Revelation, Book of;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Revelation, the;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Adoration;   Angel;   Chronology of the New Testament;   Revelation of John:;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

I fell down to worship - I prostrated myself before him as before a superior being, to express my gratitude, and give him thanks for the communications he had made. See on Revelation 19:10; (note).

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Revelation 22:8". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/revelation-22.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And I John saw these things, and heard them - That is, I saw the parts that were disclosed by pictures, visions, and symbols; I heard the parts that were communicated by direct revelation.

And when I had heard and seen, I fell down to worship before the feet of the angel, … - As he had done on a former occasion. See the notes on Revelation 19:10. John appears to have been entirely overcome by the extraordinary nature of the revelations made to him, and not improbably entertained some suspicion that it was the Redeemer himself who had manifested himself to him in this remarkable manner.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Revelation 22:8". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/revelation-22.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And I John saw these things, and heard them,.... He was both an eye and an ear witness; some things he saw, and others he heard; and to render his testimony the more authentic, he puts his name to it; and he being an apostle of Christ, and a man of great sincerity and probity, is to be believed.

And when I had heard and seen; the things related in this book, being amazed at them, and filled with joy on account of many of them, and firmly believing the whole as coming from God:

I fell down to worship before the feet of the angel which showed me these things. This is the second time John did so, though warned of it, and rebuked for it, which shows the proneness even of good men to fall into sin again and again; and what a propensity there is in mankind to idolatry; and very likely this might be suffered, that a second reproof might be given, and repeated instructions be on record, to prevent the worshipping of angels, introduced in the first ages of Christianity.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Revelation 22:8". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/revelation-22.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Both here and in Revelation 19:9, Revelation 19:10, the apostle‘s falling at the feet of the angel is preceded by a glorious promise to the Church, accompanied with the assurance, that “These are the true sayings of God,” and that those are “blessed” who keep them. Rapturous emotion, gratitude, and adoration, at the prospect of the Church‘s future glory transport him out of himself, so as all but to fall into an unjustifiable act; contrast his opposite feeling at the prospect of the Church‘s deep fall [Auberlen], see on Revelation 17:6; see on Revelation 19:9, Revelation 19:10.

saw  …  and heard — A, B, Vulgate, and Syriac transpose these verbs. Translate literally, “I John (was he) who heard and saw these things.” It is observable that in Revelation 19:10, the language is, “I fell before his feet to worship him”; but here, “I fell down to worship (God?) before the feet of the angel.” It seems unlikely that John, when once reproved, would fall into the very same error again. Bengel‘s view, therefore, is probable; John had first intended to worship the angel (Revelation 19:10), but now only at his feet intends to worship (God). The angel does not even permit this.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 22:8". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/revelation-22.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

And 1 John (Καγω ΙωαννηςKagō Iōannēs). Here John the Seer is the speaker. He had already given his name (Revelation 1:1, Revelation 1:4, Revelation 1:9). Here he claims to be the “one who hears and sees these things” (ο ακουων και βλεπων ταυταho akouōn kai blepōn tauta).

I fell down to worship (επεσα προσκυνησαιepesa proskunēsai). Second aorist active indicative of πιπτωpiptō (with α̇a form) and the first aorist active infinitive of purpose of προσκυνεωproskuneō It was a natural, though a wrong, thing to do, especially after Christ‘s own voice followed that of the angel “which shewed me these things” (του δεικνυοντος ταυταtou deiknuontos tauta). Genitive singular of the articular present active participle of δεικνυωdeiknuō Cf. Revelation 1:1; Revelation 4:1; Revelation 17:1; Revelation 21:9.; Revelation 22:1, Revelation 22:6.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Revelation 22:8". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/revelation-22.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

I John saw ( ἐγὼ Ἱωάννης ὁ βλέπων )

The A.V. overlooks the article with the participle - the one seeing. Hence Rev., correctly, I John am he that heard and saw.

Had heard and seen ( ἤκουσα καὶ ἔβλεψα )

Aorist tense. There is no need of rendering it as a pluperfect. Rev., rightly, I heard and saw. The appeal to hearing and seeing is common to all John's writings. See John 1:14; John 19:35; John 21:14; 1 John 1:1, 1 John 1:2; 1 John 4:14.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 22:8". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/revelation-22.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And I John saw these things, and heard them. And when I had heard and seen, I fell down to worship before the feet of the angel which shewed me these things.

I fell down to worship at the feet of the angel — The very same words which occur, Revelation 19:10. The reproof of the angel, likewise, See thou do it not|, for I am thy fellowservant, is expressed in the very same terms as before. May it not be the very same incident which is here related again? Is not this far more probable, than that the apostle would commit a fault again, of which he had been so solemnly warned before?

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Revelation 22:8". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/revelation-22.html. 1765.

Scofield's Reference Notes

angel

(See Scofield "Hebrews 1:4").

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Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Revelation 22:8". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/revelation-22.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

8 And I John saw these things, and heard them. And when I had heard and seen, I fell down to worship before the feet of the angel which shewed me these things.

Ver. 8. Saw these things and heard them] So that there is no colour of cause why any one should doubt or distrust such a witness.

I fell down to worship] This is the second time. It is hard to say how often a saint may fall into the same sin; howbeit they sin of incogitancy; put them in mind, and they mend all. They sin of passion, and passions last not long. There is no way of wickedness in them, they make not a trade of it, Psalms 139:24.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Revelation 22:8". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/revelation-22.html. 1865-1868.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Revelation 22:8. (242) καὶ ἐγὼ, and I) Dionysius of Alexandria construed this also with μακάριος, blessed, Revelation 22:7 : εἰμὶ, I am, is rather to be understood.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Revelation 22:8". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/revelation-22.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

I John saw these things; I saw the vision.

And heard them; I heard the words spoken to me relating to them.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Revelation 22:8". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/revelation-22.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

видел и слышал Здесь Иоанн в первый раз подводит итог всему сказанному после первой главы и подтверждает достоверность откровения своим собственным свидетельским заявлением. Это является основой любого надежного свидетельства.

палчтобы поклониться См. пояснение к 19:10.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Revelation 22:8". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/revelation-22.html.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And I John am he that heard and saw these things. And when I heard and saw, I fell down to worship before the feet of the angel that showed me these things.

And I John ... Who is this John who writes with such assurance and authority? It is foolish to raise such a question, because there is but one John. Instinctively the Christian heart turns to the blessed apostle, that disciple whom the Lord loved.[40] As Hilgenfield remarked:

An unknown John whose name has disappeared from history, leaving hardly any trace behind it, can scarcely have given commands in the name of Christ and of the Spirit to the seven churches.[41]

I fell down to worship before the feet of the angel ... Notice the startling difference between this passage and that of Revelation 19:10. There, John fell down to worship the angel; here he fell down to "worship God" in the presence of the angel. One may only be astounded at the scholarly blindness to this astounding difference in the two incidents. It is not recorded here that John fell down to "worship the angel"; therefore, it must be concluded that John intended to "worship God" before the feet of the angel. Otherwise, we would have to suppose that John deliberately disobeyed the prohibition mentioned on the first occasion. John did not merely forget what he had been commanded. No! this was something different. In this event, he was directing the worship to God, but doing so "before the feet of the angel." We deplore the fact that all of the writers whose works we have examined missed this completely. Note:

John repeats the curious incident of Revelation 19:10.[42] This is the same incident which is here related again.[43] John failed to learn his lesson from the heavenly messenger in Revelation 19:10.[44] This is a duplication.[45] John twice mistook an angel for the Lord Jesus Christ.[46] Either John would have removed this passage as a needless repetition, if he had had opportunity fully to revise his book, or he thought it necessary to give the same warning twice.[47]

All such views do not even see the corral, much less the mule! The overwhelming importance of these two different episodes is that they show the utter sinfulness of bowing down in the presence of even the highest angel in order to worship God.

The derivative teaching from this is that it is likewise sinful to bow down before a man, or before an image in order to worship God. The specious reasoning by which it is pretended that people bow down before images and religious prelates "to worship God" in so doing is dramatically refuted by this.

The prompt action of God's angel in forbidding John to bow down before an angel while in the act of "worshipping God" also forbids the notion that one may bow down before men or images (both of which are far less than an angel) while in the act of worshipping God. "A Christian should assume no prostrating position"[48] before any being, or any thing, in such a manner as to suggest worship. People should worship God only through Christ; but more, they must not assume any kind of position that could suggest worship of any other being, or object. The failure to discern this truth was the basis for the justification of idol worship by the ancient pagans themselves.

Robert H. Charles, Archdeacon of Westminster, said: "The golden calves in Dan, Bethel, and Samaria were treated as outward symbols of deity, and not as deity itself."[49] Most significantly, this is exactly the line of reasoning followed by those who seek to justify the consecration and use of sacred images in the worship of Jesus Christ today. These marvelous passages (both of them) show that it is not merely the worship of an angel (or a man, or an image) that is proscribed and forbidden to Christians, it is the bowing down before them that is also sinful, even though the purpose might be alleged as being to worship God in such a position. What a tragedy that so much of current scholarship seems totally blind to this truth. In the light of this blindness, one may wonder if a move to consecrate sacred images in many Protestant churches today would be resisted.

[40] Walter Scott, Exposition of the Revelation of Jesus Christ (Old Tappan, New Jersey: Fleming H. Revell Company, n.d.), p. 444.

[41] Hilgenfield as quoted by Walter Scott, op. cit., p. 444.

[42] G. B. Caird, op. cit., p. 283.

[43] John Wesley, op. cit., in loco.

[44] James D. Strauss, op. cit., p. 289.

[45] Martin Rist, op. cit., p. 545.

[46] R. C. H. Lenski, op. cit., p. 661.

[47] William Barclay, op. cit., p. 224.

[48] Watchman Nee, "Come, Lord Jesus" (New York: Christian Fellowship Publishers, 1976), p. 252.

[49] Robert H. Charles, The Decalogue (Edinburgh: T. and T. Clark, 1923). p. 54.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Revelation 22:8". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/revelation-22.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘And I, John, am the one who heard and saw these things. And when I heard and saw I fell down to venerate at the feet of the angel who showed me these things, and he says to me, “See that you do not do it. I am a fellow-servant with you and your brothers the prophets and with those who keep the words of this book. Worship God”.’

The writer first confirms who he is, that he is the John whom everyone will know, and that his information is first hand. Then he informs us of what was a natural reaction to what he had experienced. He fell before the angel in awe and reverence. But even this was not to be. The angel strongly forbids such behaviour and stresses that such should only be shown to God. Man is ever slow to learn this lesson. None is to be venerated but God.

Over the last two thousand years these words have been constantly ignored. Fallen man, when he rejects idolatry and yet fails to come to Jesus Christ in full trust and obedience, loves to replace idols with other substitutes. This is so whether they be Mary or the so-called saints or angels. The angels stricture applies equally here. They too were fellow-servants and are not to be shown veneration, which is all too similar to full worship. They become substitutes for God and barriers against a full knowledge of Him. We must remember the words of the angel. “See you do not do it”. But he is not saying that all men are on a level with angels. Rather he is saying that those who have truly responded to Christ are raised in status to that of the angels, ‘fellow-servants’ of God.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Revelation 22:8". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/revelation-22.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

John resumed addressing the reader, which he had not done since Revelation 1:1; Revelation 1:4; Revelation 1:9. He affirmed the angel"s words that the prophecy was genuine. He himself had heard and had seen the things that he had recorded (cf. Daniel 8:15; Daniel 12:5). He was an eyewitness of these things (cf. John 1:14; John 19:35; John 21:14; 1 John 1:1-3; 1 John 4:14).

John confessed that when he had heard and seen these things he reacted by worshipping the angel who revealed them to him (cf. Revelation 19:10). It was the revelation of the new creation that evidently moved John to respond this way a second time. John"s strong reaction further attests the genuineness of the amazing revelations that he had received.

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 22:8". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/revelation-22.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Revelation 22:8. And I, John, am he that heard and saw these things. Once more, as at chap. Revelation 1:1; Revelation 1:4, the Seer names himself, thus again binding together the opening and closing paragraphs of his book,—a clear proof that by the words ‘these things’ we are to understand the contents of the whole book and not merely those of its latest section. On the importance of seeing and hearing, comp. 1 John 1:1-2.

And when I heard and saw I fell down to worship before the feet of the angel which showed me these things. Once before, at chap. Revelation 19:10, he had done the same thing, and had been corrected for it. We need not wonder that he should do it again; nor is it necessary to think that, having just heard the words ‘Behold, I come quickly, he may have been doubtful whether the angel before him was the Lord Himself or not. Such had been the glory of the revelations that a mistake of this kind might easily be made more than once. But, whenever made, it was needful that it should be pointed out.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Revelation 22:8". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/revelation-22.html. 1879-90.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

-9 is the second time the saint wishes to adore the Angel, but not with the supreme worship of latria, as he knew the object of his worship was only an Angel, and of course a mere creature; but the Angel, through respect for St. John, still refuses the proffered honour, (see Chap. xix. 10.) and to shew the holy society that was hereafter to exist between Angels and men, who were to compose but one and the same family. (Bible de Vence)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Revelation 22:8". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/revelation-22.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

saw, &c. The texts read "am he that heard and saw these things".

saw. App-133.

had. Omit.

seen = saw, as above.

worship. App-137.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Revelation 22:8". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/revelation-22.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And I John saw these things, and heard them. And when I had heard and seen, I fell down to worship before the feet of the angel which shewed me these things.

Both here and in Revelation 19:9-10, the apostle's falling at the angel's feet is preceded by a glorious promise to the Church, and the assurance, 'These are the true sayings of God,' and that those are "blessed" who keep them. Rapturous gratitude and adoration, at the prospect of the Church's glory, transport him out of himself, to fall into an unjustifiable act. Contrast his opposite feeling at the Church's deep fall (Auberlen) (Revelation 17:6, note; Revelation 19:9-10).

Saw ... and heard. So 'Aleph ('); but A B, Vulgate, Syriac, transpose, 'I John (was he) who heard and saw these things.' In Revelation 19:10, it is, "I fell before his feet to worship him;" here, "I fell down to worship (God?) before the feet of the angel." It seems unlikely that John, once reproved, would fall into the same error again. Probably John intended to worship [ proskuneesai (Greek #4352), a lower worship than latreia (Greek #2999)] the angel (Revelation 19:10), but now only at his feet intends to worship (God). The angel does not even permit this.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 22:8". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/revelation-22.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(8) And I John saw these things . . .—Or rather, And I John am he who hears and sees these things. The words of the angel are confirmed by the words of Christ. Now we have the confirmatory testimony of the seer to the truth of the vision. The declaration reminds us of the opening of the Epistle of St. John: “That which we have seen and heard declare we unto you” (1 John 1:1-3). It is no mere dream or ingenious fancy of his own that he has recorded; it is a veritable revelation.

And when I had heard . . .—Or better, When I heard and saw, I fell down to worship before the feet of the angel who was showing me these things. Wonder and awe took possession of the seer, and for the second time he was about to offer unlawful homage to the angel-minister. (Comp. Revelation 19:10.) This twice offered and twice refused worship is full of teaching. To render to all their due is wise and seemly and Christ-like; to offer exaggerated homage to any is to invert God’s order, and to degrade by pretending to exalt man, whose true glory is that he is God’s creation.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Revelation 22:8". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/revelation-22.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And I John saw these things, and heard them. And when I had heard and seen, I fell down to worship before the feet of the angel which shewed me these things.
I fell
19:10,19
Reciprocal: Genesis 24:40 - will;  Joshua 5:14 - fell on his;  Psalm 95:6 - worship;  Psalm 103:21 - ministers;  Daniel 2:46 - fell;  Daniel 8:17 - I was;  Zechariah 1:9 - the angel;  Matthew 2:11 - worshipped;  Matthew 4:9 - if;  Matthew 8:2 - worshipped;  Matthew 10:2 - John;  Mark 5:22 - he fell;  Mark 7:25 - at;  Luke 4:7 - worship me;  Luke 5:8 - he;  John 11:32 - she fell;  Acts 10:25 - and fell;  Colossians 2:18 - worshipping;  Revelation 4:10 - worship

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Revelation 22:8". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/revelation-22.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

These things refer to the vision of the celestial city and what the angel said about it. In Revelation 19:10 John attempted to worship the angel but was prevented. Hence the things of our verse would have to apply to what had come before him since that time. The word worship is one of the terms in the Greek New Testament that have many shades of meaning, because it is from a dozen original words with about that many different definitions. Hence not every form or kind of worship would be condemned. The word as used in our verse and the following one, also in Revelation 19:10, means to prostrate oneself before another as a recognition of superiority in rank. Such an attitude is due only to God and his Son. Angels are not superior to men as to their personal merit nor even in authority. In the great sphere of service to God the angels are only some of His servants. That is the reason that the angel assigned for his instructions to John in this place and also in Revelation 19:10 refused to be worshipped. And it is the same reason why Peter refused the worship from Cornelius in Acts 10:25-26 saying, "Stand up; I myself also am a man." This does not condemn the acts of homage that are paid to kingsor other dignitaries as was the custom in old time and is yet in some countries. Those performances pertain to matters of social or legal standing, while the word under consideration in our passages has to do with authority in religion. For a complete analysis of this word according to the lexicon and concordance, see the comments at Matthew 2:2 in the first ‘volume of the New Testament Commentary.

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Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on Revelation 22:8". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/revelation-22.html. 1952.

Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation

Revelation 22:8

Revelation 22:8 And I John saw these things, and heard them. And when I had heard and seen, I fell down to worship before the feet of the angel which shewed me these things.

I John saw these things and heard them

This is the disciple which testifieth these things: and we know, that his testimony is true, { John 21:24}

I fell down to worship before the feet of the angel, etc.

It is neither lawful to worship any creature instead of God, nor to fall down before any creature to worship God. { Revelation 19:10}

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Knollys, Hanserd. "Commentary on Revelation 22:8". "Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hkc/revelation-22.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Revelation 22:8. And I John am he, who heard and saw these things. And when I heard and saw, I fell down to worship at the feet of the angel, who showed me these things. Revelation 22:9. And he said to me, See thou do it not; I am thy fellow-servant, and of thy brethren the prophets, and of those who keep the words of this book. Worship God. These two verses also have respect to the high importance of the book, and press it on the hearts of the readers, that they take up the right position in regard to it. A trustworthy man, a tried organ of divine communications, JOHN, whom Jesus loved, expressly assures us, that he has not spoken of his own, but only what he has heard and received. And this same John, carried away by the lofty theme of the Revelation, throws himself down before the angel, who had conveyed to him such a wonderful message. With what profound reverence, then, should not the church regard a book, which unfolds such things to her view! How should she tremble before the word of God, which is there presented to her!

In regard to the expression: I John, see at ch. Revelation 1:1; Revelation 1:4; Revelation 1:9. "But who," says Vitringa, "could he be, excepting John the apostle; known by this name to the churches, the venerable elder of the Asiatic churches?" Bengel also says, "John had placed his name in the title of his book, in the superscription to the seven churches, and at the beginning of his narrative. And now at the close he names himself still again, so that we might perfectly know, that he, namely the apostle John, bad written this credible testimony of the future coming of Jesus Christ. A learned man who otherwise possessed much good, has said concerning it, that John affixes his name so frequently, that it seems as if he had wished to write an obligation. The words are almost ludicrous; but we may turn them to good account. For as people set their names to important original documents, to prevent all error and uncertainty respecting them, so John does substantially the same here." In his Gospel also, John 21:24, John points to his person as a security for the truth of what is reported by him. Often, too, in the Gospel does he mention his name (John 13:23; John 19:26; John 21:20), only he does it there covertly, in accordance with the objective character of all biblical history, which everywhere allows the I to fall back; while here, according to the custom. of the prophets (see on ch. Revelation 1:1), he comes quite boldly forward, with his I John. It is, further, common to the Revelation and the Gospel, not only that there should be an emphatic assurance of the truth and trustworthiness of the matters reported (comp. Revelation 22:6 here, and the parallel passages, with John 19:35, John 21:14), but also that there should be a special reference to the seeing and hearing (John 1:14, John 19:35; 1 John 1:1-2, 1 John 4:14). We must here lay the emphasis on the name John, and on the heard and saw.

In ch. Revelation 19:10 the offered worship had respect to the joyful message concerning the universal dominion of God, which was certainly at hand, the marriage of the Lamb, and the preparation of the bride: here, on the other hand, it is done in respect to the whole subject-matter of the book. The only other difference is, that here, in addition to the prophets, those also are mentioned who keep the words of this book. Bengel: "Much stress must indeed be laid upon the discourses of this book, and on the keeping of it; because those who keep it stand in such a blessed society and brotherhood." The angels are servants of God, in respect to their office, and so also are the prophets. Those, therefore, who keep the words of this book, could not be regarded in any other light than as servants of God in his vineyard. The keeping of the words of this book manifests itself in those, to whom it belongs, especially by their not appearing faint and lifeless in the testimony of Jesus (comp. at ch. Revelation 14:12); and to have the testimony of Jesus is a calling in the church (comp. at ch. Revelation 6:9, Revelation 12:17). Or, we are to regard those, who keep the words of this book, as annexed to the prophets, so that the angel is only in so far their fellow-servant, as they are comprehended under the prophets as their heads. Even if we should ascribe to them a separate and independent place, they must still not be loosed from their connection with the prophets. The parallel passages shew, that the pre-eminent dignity of this class is what properly calls forth the declinature.

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Bibliographical Information
Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on Revelation 22:8". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/revelation-22.html.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

8.Saw’ and heard—What God sent his angel to show.

These things—The apocalyptic showings and sayings.

I fell down—Re-narrating here the fact of Revelation 19:10, to show that so truly divine seemed this apocalypse that he came near to worshipping the mere messenger that brought it.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Revelation 22:8". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/revelation-22.html. 1874-1909.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

There is no trace of any reluctance on the prophet’s part to return to earth, as in Asc. Isa. (Gk.), 2:33–35.

 

 

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Revelation 22:8". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/revelation-22.html. 1897-1910.