Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Revelation 3:10

Because you have kept the word of My perseverance, I also will keep you from the hour of testing, that hour which is about to come upon the whole world, to test those who dwell on the earth.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Afflictions and Adversities;   Decision;   Grace of God;   Philadelphia;   Righteous;   Temptation;   Scofield Reference Index - Kingdom;   Test-Tempt;   Tribulation;   Thompson Chain Reference - Divine;   God's;   Keeper, Divine;   Overshadowing Providence;   Promises, Divine;   Providence, Divine;   Temptation;   Tempted, Promises to;   The Topic Concordance - Obedience;   Trial;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Afflicted Saints;   Protection;   Temptation;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Perseverance;   Philadelphia;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Temptation, Test;   World;   CARM Theological Dictionary - Tribulation, the;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Philadelphia;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Jabez (1);   Philadelphia;   Revelation of John, the;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Keys of the Kingdom;   Letter Form and Function;   Lord's Prayer, the;   Patience;   Persecution in the Bible;   Revelation, the Book of;   Security of the Believer;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Asia;   Magi;   Philadelphia;   Temptation;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Hour (Figurative);   Lord's Prayer (I);   Patience;   Philadelphia ;   Revelation, Book of;   Temptation, Trial;   Word;   World;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Dwellers on Earth;   33 Patience Long-Suffering Forbearance;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Sepharvaim;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Philadelphia;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Philadel'phia,;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Parousia;   Revelation of John:;   World (General);  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for February 2;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

The word of my patience - The doctrine which has exposed you to so much trouble and persecution, and required so much patience and magnanimity to bear up under its attendant trials.

The hour of temptation - A time of sore and peculiar trial which might have proved too much for their strength. He who is faithful to the grace of God is often hidden from trials and difficulties which fall without mitigation on those who have been unfaithful in his covenant. Many understand by the hour of temptation the persecution under Trajan, which was greater and more extensive than the preceding ones under Nero and Domitian.

To try them - That is, such persecutions will be the means of trying and proving those who profess Christianity, and showing who were sound and thorough Christians and who were not.

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Revelation 3:10". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/revelation-3.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Because thou hast kept the word of my patience - My word commanding or enjoining patience; that is, thou hast manifested the patience which I require. They had shown this in the trials which they had experienced; he promises now, that in return he will keep them in the future trials that shall come upon the world. One of the highest rewards of patience in one trial is the grace that God gives us to bear another. The fact that we have been patient and submis sive may be regarded as proof that he will give us grace that we may be patient and submissive in the trials that are to come. God does not leave those who have shown that they will not leave him.

I also will keep thee - That is, I will so keep you that you shall not sink under the trials which will prove a severe temptation to many. This does not mean that they would be actually kept from calamity of all kinds, but that they would be kept from the temptation of apostasy in calamity. He would give them grace to bear up under trials with a Christian spirit, and in such a manner that their salvation should not be endangered.

From the hour of temptation - The season; the time; the period of temptation. You shall be no kept that what will prove to be a time of temptation to so many, shall not endanger your salvation. Though others fall, you shall not; though you may be afflicted with others, yet you shall have grace to sustain you.

Which shall come upon all the world - The phrase used here - “all the world” - may either denote the whole world; or the whole Roman empire; or a large district of country; or the land of Judaea. See the notes on Luke 2:1. Here, perhaps, all that is implied is, that the trial would be very extensive or general - so much so as to embrace the world, as the word was understood by those to whom the epistle was addressed. It need not be supposed that the whole world literally was included in it, or even all the Roman empire, but what was the world to them - the region which they would embrace in that term. If there were some far-spreading calamity in the country where they resided, it would probably be all that would be fairly embraced in the meaning of the word. It is not known to what trial the speaker refers. It may have been some form of persecution, or it may have been some calamity by disease, earthquake, or famine that was to occur. Tacitus (see Wetstein, in loco) mentions an earthquake that sank twelve cities in Asia Minor, in one night, by which, among others, Philadelphia was deeply affected; and ‹it is possible that there may have been reference here to that overwhelming calamity. But nothing can be determined with certainty in regard to this.

To try them that dwell upon the earth - To test their character. It would rather seem from this that the affliction was some form of persecution as adapted to test the fidelity of those who were affected by it. The persecutions in the Roman empire would furnish abundant occasions for such a trial.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Revelation 3:10". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/revelation-3.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

Because thou didst keep the word of my patience, I also will keep thee from the hour of trial, that hour which is to come upon the whole world, to try them that dwell on the earth.

The word of my patience ... Of several interpretations advocated regarding this, that of Trench as quoted by Earle seems the best: "It is much better to take the whole Gospel as the word of Christ's patience, everywhere teaching, as it does, the need of a patient waiting for Christ."[45]

I will also keep thee from the hour of trial ... This figures prominently in the theories of millennialists, who take the passage as emphasizing that Christians shall be delivered from not through the great trial, "implying the rapture of the church before the time referred to as "the great tribulation."[46] "The thrust of the verse is against this interpretation. It was precisely because the church was faithful in time of trial that Christ in turn will be faithful to them.'"[47] This view of the passage harmonizes with the great high-priestly prayer of Jesus who did not pray that the Father would take his disciples "out of the world" (John 17:15), but that they would be faithful in the world. Furthermore, the promise of Luke 21:17 is explanatory of what is meant here. What Christ promised is safety through trials, not exemption from trials. "There is no promise in Revelation that God's people shall escape suffering and death, but there is the promise that no harm can come to their souls."[48]

The hour of trial ... What is the great trial which is coming upon the whole world? Primarily, the meaning is the great persecution that was upon the point of breaking out against the church. We agree with Beasley-Murray that it is certainly possible that, "an identical period of trial is referred to in both Revelation 2:10 and Revelation 3:1."[49] The looming persecution against the church is starkly evident in all the New Testament books, and hardly any of them failed to address the situation. In fact, the principal burden of the great prophecies about to be unveiled was that of strengthening and encouraging the church against that very event. That it is here called "the hour" of trial does not mean that it will be over in an hour, or even in any relatively short time. "In the hour of trial" means "in any hour of trial." As Beasley-Murray said, "This is not a designation of a period of time, but of the trial itself."[50] A secondary meaning applies the text to the final judgment. "In principle, the same promise would fit the judgment as the great trial for the whole human race."[51] From Matthew 24, etc., all should be familiar with this quality in prophecies regarding such events.

[45] Ralph Earle, op. cit., p. 520.

[46] Walvoord as quoted by Robert H. Mounce, op. cit., p. 119.

[47] Ibid.

[48] Edward A. McDowell, The Meaning and Message of the Book of Revelation (Nashville: Broadman Press, 1951), p. 58.

[49] G. R. Beasley-Murray, op. cit., p. 101.

[50] Ibid.

[51] John T. Hinds, op. cit., p. 59.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Revelation 3:10". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/revelation-3.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Because thou hast kept the word of my patience,.... The Gospel; so called because it gives an account of the patience of Christ, in the midst of all his outward meanness and humiliation; and because it is a means of implanting and increasing the grace of patience, which God is the efficient cause of, and Christ is the example of; that patience, which bears a resemblance to his, in enduring afflictions, reproaches, persecutions, desertions, and temptations, and in waiting for his kingdom and glory; and because both the preachers and professors of the word have need of patience, and should exercise it in like manner as Christ did. This word, the churches, in the Philadelphian state, will keep pure and incorrupt, and observe the ordinances of it according to the directions given in it; and will believe the promise of Christ's personal coming, and patiently wait for it: wherefore, Christ promises as follows,

I also will keep thee from the hour of temptation, which shall come upon all the world, to try them that dwell upon the earth; this hour seems to refer not to any of the vials which will be poured out on the antichristian states, but to some affliction and distress which will befall the reformed churches, and will light upon the outward court worshippers among them It seems to be the last struggle of the beast of Rome, and to denote some violent and sharp persecution, such as what Daniel mentions, that never was before nor since; but it will be but short, but one hour, the twenty fourth part of a prophetical day or year, perhaps about a fortnight; yet it will be very extensive; it will reach all the world, the whole Roman empire, and all that dwell upon the earth, that are called by the name of Christians, and will try them, whether they are so or not; Christ will now have his fan in his hand, and purge his floor of all his formal professors and hypocrites; and it will be known who are his true churches, and pure members; and these he will keep close to himself, and preserve safe amidst all the distress and confusion the world will be in. This cannot refer to the bloody persecutions under the Roman emperors, for from those the church at Philadelphia was not preserved. We readF19Euseb. Eccl. Hist. l. 4. c. 15. of twelve members of it that suffered with Polycarp,

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
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Gill, John. "Commentary on Revelation 3:10". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/revelation-3.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Because thou hast g kept the word of my patience, I also will keep thee from the hour of temptation, which shall come upon all the world, to try them that dwell upon the earth.

(g) Because you have been patient and constant, as I would have my servants be.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Revelation 3:10". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/revelation-3.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

patience — “endurance.” “The word of My endurance” is My Gospel word, which teaches patient endurance in expectation of my coming (Revelation 1:9). My endurance is the endurance which I require, and which I practice. Christ Himself now endures, patiently waiting until the usurper be cast out, and all “His enemies be made His footstool.” So, too, His Church, for the joy before her of sharing His coming kingdom, endures patiently. Hence, in Revelation 3:11, follows, “Behold, I come quickly.”

I also — The reward is in kind: “because thou didst keep,” etc. “I also (on My side) will keep thee,” etc.

fromGreek, “(so as to deliver thee) out of,” not to exempt from temptation.

the hour of temptation — the appointed season of affliction and temptation (so in Deuteronomy 4:34 the plagues are called “the temptations of Egypt”), literally, “the temptation”: the sore temptation which is coming on: the time of great tribulation before Christ‘s second coming.

to try them that dwell upon the earth — those who are of earth, earthy (Revelation 8:13). “Dwell” implies that their home is earth, not heaven. All mankind, except the elect (Revelation 13:8, Revelation 13:14). The temptation brings out the fidelity of those kept by Christ and hardens the unbelieving reprobates (Revelation 9:20, Revelation 9:21; Revelation 16:11, Revelation 16:21). The particular persecutions which befell Philadelphia shortly after, were the earnest of the great last tribulation before Christ‘s coming, to which the Church‘s attention in all ages is directed.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 3:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/revelation-3.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Patience (υπομενηςhupomenēs). “Endurance” as in Revelation 13:10; Revelation 14:12 as also in 2 Thessalonians 3:5.

Thou didst keep (ετηρησαςetērēsas) - I also will keep (καγω τηρησωkagō tērēsō). Aorist active indicative and future active corresponding to each other. For a like play on the tenses of this verb by Christ see John 17:6 (τετηρηκανtetērēkan), John 17:11 (τηρησονtērēson), John 17:12 (ετηρουνetēroun).

From the hour of trial (εκ της ωρας του πειρασμουek tēs hōras tou peirasmou). This use of εκek after τηρεωtēreō in John 17:15, αποapo in James 1:27. Trial brings temptation often (James 1:2, James 1:13). Jesus endured (Hebrews 12:1.) and he will help them. There is still a church in Philadelphia in spite of the Turks.

Which is to come (της μελλουσης ερχεσταιtēs mellousēs erchesthai). Agreeing with ωραςhōras (feminine), not with πειρασμουpeirasmou (masculine).

Upon the whole world (επι της εποικουμενης οληςepi tēs epoikoumenēs holēs). The inhabited earth (γηςgēs) as in Revelation 12:9; Luke 2:1; Acts 16:6, etc.), not the physical earth, but the world of men as explained by the next clause.

To try (πειρασαιpeirasai). First aorist active infinitive of purpose from πειραζωpeirazō probably to tempt (cf. the demons in 9:1-21), not merely to afflict (Revelation 2:10).

That dwell upon the earth (τους κατοικουντας επι της γηςtous katoikountas epi tēs gēs). Present active articular participle of κατοικεωkatoikeō explaining “the whole world” just before.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Revelation 3:10". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/revelation-3.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

The word of my patience ( τὸν λόγον τῆς ὑπομονῆς μου )

Not the words which Christ has spoken concerning patience, but the word of Christ which requires patience to keep it; the gospel which teaches the need o£ a patient waiting for Christ. On patience, see on 2 Peter 1:6; see on James 5:7.

From the hour ( ἐκ )

The preposition implies, not a keeping from temptation, but a keeping in temptation, as the result of which they shall be delivered out of its power. Compare John 17:15.

Of temptation ( τοῦ πειρασμοῦ )

Lit., “of the trial” See on Matthew 6:13; see on 1 Peter 1:7. Rev., trial.

World ( οἰκουμένης )

See on Luke 2:1

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 3:10". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/revelation-3.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Because thou hast kept the word of my patience, I also will keep thee from the hour of temptation, which shall come upon all the world, to try them that dwell upon the earth.

Because thou hast kept the word of my patience — The word of Christ is indeed a word of patience. I also will keep thee - O happy exemption from that spreading calamity! From the hour of temptation - So that thou shalt not enter into temptation; but it shall pass over thee. The hour denotes the short time of its continuance; that is, at any one place. At every one it was very sharp, though short; wherein the great tempter was not idle, Revelation 2:10. Which hour shall come upon the whole earth - The whole Roman empire. It went over the Christians, and over the Jews and heathens; though in a very different manner. This was the time of the persecution under the seemingly virtuous emperor Trajan. The two preceding persecutions were under those monsters, Nero and Domitian; but Trajan was so admired for his goodness, and his persecution was of such a nature, that it was a temptation indeed, and did throughly try them that dwelt upon the earth.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Revelation 3:10". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/revelation-3.html. 1765.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

The word of my patience, that is, my word enjoining patience.--To try them; to put their fidelity to test.

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Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Revelation 3:10". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/revelation-3.html. 1878.

Scofield's Reference Notes

world

"oikoumene" = inhabited earth. (See Scofield "Luke 2:1").

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Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Revelation 3:10". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/revelation-3.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

10 Because thou hast kept the word of my patience, I also will keep thee from the hour of temptation, which shall come upon all the world, to try them that dwell upon the earth.

Ver. 10. The word of my patience] So called,

1. Because we must suffer for the truth of it.

2. Because, hid in the heart, it worketh patience.

I will keep thee] From the hurt, if not from the smart of it; from the common distraction, if not from the common destruction.

Which shall come upon all the world] So the Romans in their pride called their empire.

To try them that dwell] sc. By that sharp and sore persecution under Trajan the emperor.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Revelation 3:10". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/revelation-3.html. 1865-1868.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Still our blessed Saviour proceeds with promises and encouragements to this church, Because thou hast kept the word of my patience.

Here note, That the doctrine of the gospel is called the word of Christ's patience, partly because it teaches patience in persecuting times, and partly because it is a doctrine which cannot firmly be adhered to without patience, Thou hast kept the word of my patience.

To keep this word of Christ's patience, implies not only the keeping his doctrine pure and uncorrupted from error, but also the observing and practising all the duties of a good life.

And note, The reward promised to this church for the performing of this duty, Because thou hast kept--I will keep thee; Christ will not be behind-hand in rewarding our obedience, no, not in this life: I will (here) keep thee from the hour of temptation, which shall come upon all the world.

Here note, 1. That a time of affliction, much more of persecution, is a time of temptation, because an afflicted and persecuted state hath many circumstances attending it, by which all are tried and some ensnared.

Note, 2. That a time of trial and temptation will come, most certainly come, sooner or later, upon all persons that dwell upon the earth, upon sinners as well as saints, upon hypocrites as well as sincere Christians; which trials will infallibly discover the faith and constancy of the one, the corruption and apostasy of the other: Because thou hast kept the word of my patience, I will also keep thee from the hour of temptation.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Revelation 3:10". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/revelation-3.html. 1700-1703.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Revelation 3:10. ὅτι ἐτήρησας

κἀγώ σε τηρήσω. The form of the antanaclasis(1453) corresponds with the inner relation between the performance of the church, and the reward on the Lord’s part; but even the performance of the church depends entirely upon the Lord’s grace, as the λόγος τ. ὑπο΄. itself, which the church has kept, is full of divine power, nourishes and supports the faith, fidelity, patience, and hope of the church, and thus qualifies the same for victory.

τὸν λόγον τῆς ὑπο΄ονῆς ΄ου. The gen. ὑπο΄ονῆς designates the λόγος according to its peculiar nature, as it depends upon its contents;(1454) the pronoun ΄ου belongs not only to τῆς ὑπο΄.,(1455) but(1456) to the whole conception τ. λογ. τ. ὑπο΄.(1457) The form of statement in Revelation 1:9 is therefore, at all events, a different one.(1458) Consequently τ. λογ. τ. ὑπο΄. ΄ου cannot be: “the word concerning Christ’s patience, concerning the sufferings of Christ patiently endured for us,” or “the word of constancy in Christ’s faith;”(1459) or “the word which makes its demands partly according to its contents and spirit,(1460) and partly by virtue of the duty of confession and steadfastness in following, as it belongs to me and mine;”(1461) also not: “my patience, i. e., the specifically Christian, expressly required by the Lord himself, and enjoined as a preservative against the judgments threatened against the world.”(1462) The vacillation and juncture of different ideas by all interpreters who wish to refer the μου only to τ. ὑπομ. reveals the unnaturalness of the combination. The λόγος τῆς ὑπομονῆς of the Lord dare not, however, be explained: “the word which among other commandments contains that of patience also,” an explanation which is incorrectly ascribed to Grot., who, as many others vacillating concerning the relation of the μου, says at one time: “My precept concerning patience,” and then, again, that the patience of Christ signifies “that which Christ has enjoined.” The whole word of God as a word of patience rather appears to be the view of the Revelation in general, and of our epistle in particular, because with respect to troubles unavoidable to believers it gives and demands steadfast, faithful, and hopeful patience, i.e., the virtue which alone can lead us from all troubles to glory.(1463) With respect to the already present and still future troubles, every thing to the believer turns upon the fact that he “overcomes.” This he can attain only through the ὑπομονή, to which the word of his Lord points him. Thus the writer of the Apoc. can from his point of vision regard the whole word of Christ as a λόγον τῆς ὑπομονῆς with the same right as, e.g., Paul, the preacher of righteousness, alone by faith in the Crucified, represents the whole gospel as the λόγος τοῦ σταυροῦ(1464)

In the words κἀγώ σε τηρήσω ἐκ τῆς ὥρας, κ. τ. λ., the church at Philadelphia is not promised that it shall be preserved from the hour of trial, i.e., that it shall not meet with sufferings full of trial,(1465) but in accordance with the presentation of the Apoc., that the troubles before the coming of the Lord will befall all believers, who of course are sealed,(1466) lest by the temptation in the troubles they may fall;(1467) and in accordance with the corresponding expression τηρ. ἐκ,(1468) in distinction from τηρ. ἀπό,(1469) the church at Philadelphia, since it has already maintained victorious patience, is also to be delivered by his confirming grace from the universal distress impending before the coming of the Lord.(1470)

The ὥρα τοῦ πειρασ΄οῦ, κ. τ. λ., i.e., the precise period wherein the temptation is to occur,(1471) refers to no persecution whatever proceeding from the Roman emperors,—neither that of Nero,(1472) nor some one after Domitian,(1473) possibly under Trajan,(1474)—also not, as Primas and Beda(1475) arbitrarily agree, to sufferings occasioned by antichrist; but the idea, here not more minutely defined, is to be referred, according to the further development of the Apoc., to all the afflictions which, before the personal coming of the Lord,(1476) are to burst upon believers;(1477) the punishments impending by God’s wrath only over unbelievers before the appearing of the Lord are not meant.(1478)

The idea of the πειρασμός and πειράσαι(1479) has its justification because, on the one hand, to believers the danger of a fall into such suffering is present,(1480)—and hence there go with it the promise σὲ τηρήσω, the command κράτει, κ. τ. λ., Revelation 3:11, and the pledge to the victor, Revelation 3:12,—but, on the other hand, to unbelievers such suffering must actually be a temptation,(1481) and that, too, of such kind as that because of their impenitent unbelief they will ever fall by it the deeper, and their hostility to what is holy be always the more revealed by despair and blasphemy.(1482)

ἐπὶ τὴς οἰκουμένης ὅλης. The remark that hereby the Roman empire is designated(1483) is correct only so far as in John’s historical horizon the whole world appears comprehended in the Roman empire. Yet by this (erroneous) limitation, the prophetic truth remains untouched, that the hour of temptation is to come to the actual οἰκουμένη ὅλη, as certainly as the Lord himself is to appear as absolutely Judge of all.

πειράσαι τοὺς κατοικοῦντας ἐπὶ τῆς γῆς. Those dwelling on the earth are, according to the constant mode of expression in the Apoc.,(1484) the mass of men, in contradistinction to believers redeemed from all nations and tongues.(1485) The πειράσαι refers to them in so far only as they are not kept ( σὲ τηρήσω).

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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Revelation 3:10". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/revelation-3.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Revelation 3:10. (49) τοὺς κατοικοῦντας ἐπὶ τῆς γῆς) Thus the Septuagint often render, when in the Hebrew ישבי הארץ is found: Isaiah 26:21, etc. But the word σκηνοῦν is used of the inhabitants of heaven, ch. Revelation 12:12.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Revelation 3:10". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/revelation-3.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Because thou hast kept the word of my patience: the doctrine of the gospel is, unquestionably, the word here called the word of the Lord’s patience, because it was that word, that doctrine, which (as those times went) could not he adhered to and observed without much patience in those that adhered to it; both actively, waiting for the promises revealed in it, and passively, enduring all manner of trials and crosses. To keep this word, was to keep close not only to the matters of faith revealed in it, but to the duty imposed by it upon ministers and others in the preaching and propagating of the gospel, and all the duties of a holy life.

I also will keep thee from the hour of temptation, which shall come upon all the world; for this faithfulness God promises to keep the ministers of this church from those persecutions which raged elsewhere, and were further, in Trajan’s time, to come upon all Christians living under the Roman empire.

To try them that dwell upon the earth; to try those Christians that lived within that empire, how well they would adhere to Christ, and the profession of the gospel. This I take to be a more proper sense, than theirs who would interpret this hour of temptation of the day of judgment, which is never so called.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Revelation 3:10". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/revelation-3.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

Я сохраню тебя от годины искушения Описание, которое дает Христос, называет событие будущего – испытание, которому в течение короткого промежутка времени будет подвергнут весь мир. Вероятно, это событие соотносится со временем, предшествующим торжеству царствования Христа на земле и описывает ярость проявления Божьего гнева и кары в виде печатей, труб и чаш. Этот период подробно описан в гл. 6–19. Вторая его половина называется «великая скорбь» (7:14, Мф. 24:21) и относится к событиям, описанным в 11:2, 3; 12:6, 14; 13:5. Глагол «сохранить» употребляется с предлогом, обычное значение которого «из», «от». Эта фраза «сохраню’ от» означает спасение церкви от страданий (см. пояснения к Ин. 14:1-3; 1Кор. 15:51, 52; 1Фес. 4:13-17). Это время – то же самое, что 70-я седьмина (Дан. 9:24-27) и «бедственное время для Иакова» (см. пояснение к Иер. 30:7).

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Revelation 3:10". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/revelation-3.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

The hour of temptation; a season of fiery trial, apparently in the shape of severe persecution.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Revelation 3:10". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/revelation-3.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘Because you kept my word of patient endurance I also will keep you from the hour of trial which is to come upon the whole world, to try those who dwell on earth. I come quickly. Hold fast what you have that no man take your crown.’

For His ‘word of patient endurance’ see Matthew 10:22; Mark 13:13; John 15:18; John 15:21; John 16:2. All who would live godly in Christ Jesus will suffer persecution (2 Timothy 3:12), and they must endure to the end. Clearly the Philadelphian church has also faced persecution instigated by false Jews, and has come through unscathed, patiently enduring. (Alternately we may read it as ‘the word of my patient endurance’, thus referring to His sufferings on the cross. But it is clear from Revelation 3:9 that there has been serious trouble, so the former is more likely).

‘I also will keep you from the hour of trial’. There is a play on the word ‘keep’. ‘You have kept my word of patient endurance’ - ‘I will keep you from the hour of trial’. God responds to the faithfulness of His people. They have already suffered enough. He will not ask them to suffer more.

‘Those who dwell on earth’ are mentioned regularly in Revelation, referring specifically to non-Christians, and the various trials that they have to go through are vividly described. They represent humanity outside the church.

So the Philadelphians are promised that in some way not described they will escape, not all the trials, but the worst of the trials to come, the ‘hour of trial’. This may have in mind that, as always in such times there will be places where the worst effects are not felt, possibly because of the presence of a humane governor. It is a reminder that God can keep His people either from or through, depending on His will, any hour of trial they have to face. But more probably it has in mind the particularly awful attacks of spiritual forces which are limited in time but which those sealed by God will not experience (Revelation 9:4-11).

They will not be kept from everything that the world must face. Their preservation is limited to a particularly severe ‘hour of trial’ which God has in mind. This ‘hour’ cannot be seen as describing the whole process of tribulation described in the following chapters, which will be prolonged, but must have reference to a particularly severe part of the trials which are coming, which they will escape. As suggested it may refer to Revelation 9:4-11.

It may well, however, have reference to the ‘hour’ mentioned in Revelation 17:12; Revelation 18:10; Revelation 18:17, promising that they will not share the fate of Babylon the Great (His people are warned to come out of her (Revelation 18:4)). Revelation 9:15 demonstrates that an ‘hour’ means a small part of what is being described. But had Jesus meant that they would totally escape something tangibly called ‘the Great Tribulation’ He would have said so. The fact is that the unique period called ‘the Great Tribulation’ as such is an invention of Bible students. The great tribulation mentioned in Matthew 24:21 was of the Jews, and could be escaped by fleeing to the mountains. It began in 70 AD at the destruction of the Temple, and continued on through the centuries (see Luke 21:24). The great tribulation in Revelation 2:22 was threatened as possibly coming on certain members of the church in John’s day. That in Revelation 7:14 refers to the same possibility.

We can compare this use of the word ‘hour’ with its use by Jesus where we are told ‘His hour was not yet come’. His hour was a short period at the end of His life and ministry. The world also must face its ‘hour’, but this church will be kept from it. Great play is often put on the words ‘out of ’ and ‘hour’ in ‘out of the hour of trial’, suggesting that because they will not go through the hour they must have been raptured. But the hour is for those who must face the trial, ‘those who dwell on earth’. Those who do not face it, even though on earth, are kept out of it. (Jesus went through His hour, the disciples were kept out of it. It was not their hour. But they were still both on earth).

‘I come quickly. Hold fast what you have that no man may take your crown.’ Jesus intends that His people live in expectancy of His imminent return, for He knows it will be an encouragement in whatever they have to face. Now, today, Christians are still looking for His imminent return, as have Christians in every age. To every generation He is ‘coming soon’. The two thousand years that have passed may seem long to us, but in God’s terminology they are two days (2 Peter 3:8 - written specifically in the light of the second coming - compare Psalms 90:4). Besides these words come from Christ in resplendence in ‘the Lord’s day’ looking back in time to where the churches are. Thus ‘quickly’ can be seen as relating to His standpoint.

For those who have been faithful a crown awaits, an idea constantly repeated in the New Testament (an incorruptible crown - 1 Corinthians 9:25; a crown won by striving in accordance with the rules - 2 Timothy 2:5; a crown of righteousness - Revelation 4:8; a crown of life - James 1:12; an unfading crown of glory - 1 Peter 5:4). We must ensure that we endure stedfastly so that it is not taken from us by others. Like entry in the book of life it is not something thatcanbe taken from us, but we are exhorted to live in such a way that we deserve it not to be taken from us.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Revelation 3:10". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/revelation-3.html. 2013.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Revelation 3:10. Because thou didst keep the word of my patience. The reference is neither to any precepts of Christ concerning patience, nor to any accounts given us of the patience of Christ Himself, but simply to Christ’s ‘word,’ which cannot be kept without much patient endurance on the part of His people.

I also will keep thee out of the hour of the trial, etc. The hour spoken of is described as that of ‘the trial,’ the great, probably the final, trial which was now about to come, which was near at hand. ‘Out of’ (comp. John 17:15) this trial believers are to be kept,—not that they are to be kept in it, when in the course of providence it comes upon the Church as well as others, but that they are to be kept entirely out of it; it shall not touch them. This trial, then, is not to be a trial of the world, in order to see whether it will repent, or a trial of the Church, in order to confirm her in faith; nor is it to operate in two ways,—bringing out the fidelity of the believing, and hardening the unbelieving. It really befalls the impenitent alone, and is the just recompense of their sin (comp. Matthew 24:5, etc.; 2 Thessalonians 3:3). Even if the righteous suffer in it, it will not be to them a ‘trial;’ they are already elect, safe. That this is the true sense of the passage is confirmed by what follows. The trial comes upon the whole inhabited world; no part of the world shall escape it. But at the same time, it comes to try them that dwell upon the earth, not all living men without exception, but, as clearly shown by the use of this expression in the Apocalypse, only the wicked (comp. chaps, Revelation 6:10, Revelation 8:13, Revelation 11:10, Revelation 13:8; Revelation 13:12; Revelation 13:14, Revelation 17:2; Revelation 17:8). The ‘earth’ is the opposite of ‘heaven’ (comp. John 3:12), and they that ‘dwell upon the earth’ do not include the saints who are already seated in heavenly places (comp. chap. Revelation 5:9, Revelation 13:6, Revelation 19:14).

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Revelation 3:10". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/revelation-3.html. 1879-90.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

temptation = trial. Greek. peirasmos. Only occurrence in Rev.

shall = is about to.

world. App-129.

try = test. Greek. peirazo. Here, and Revelation 2:2, Revelation 2:10.

earth. App-129. Compare Zephaniah 1:14-18.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Revelation 3:10". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/revelation-3.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Because thou hast kept the word of my patience, I also will keep thee from the hour of temptation, which shall come upon all the world, to try them that dwell upon the earth.

Patience. 'The word of my persevering endurance' is my Gospel word, which teaches it in expectation of my coming (Revelation 1:9). My endurance is the endurance which I require and I practice. Christ Himself now endures, patiently waiting until the usurper be cast out, and all "His enemies be made His footstool." So, too, His Church, for the joy before her of sharing His coming kingdom, endures patiently. Hence, (Revelation 3:11) follows, "Behold, I come quickly."

I also. The reward is in kind: 'because thou didst keep,' etc., 'I also (on my side) will keep thee,' etc.

From, [ ek (Greek #1537), not apo (Greek #575)] - '(so as to deliver thee) out of,' not to exempt from temptation.

The hour of (the) temptation - the appointed season of affliction (Deuteronomy 4:34, the plagues are called "the temptations of Egypt"): the sore temptation coming on: the great tribulation before Christ's second coming.

To try them that dwell upon the earth - of earth, earthy (Revelation 8:13). "Dwell" implies their home is earth, not heaven. All mankind, except the elect (Revelation 13:8; Revelation 13:14). The temptation brings out the fidelity of those kept by Christ, and hardens the reprobates (Revelation 9:20-21; Revelation 16:11; Revelation 16:21). The persecutions which befell Philadelphia shortly after, were the earnest of the great tribulation before Christ's coming, to which the Church's attention in all ages is directed.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 3:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/revelation-3.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(10) Because thou hast kept (better, didst keep) the word of my patience.—The one who keeps God’s word is kept. Such is “the benigna talio of the kingdom of God,” as Archbishop Trench calls it. The promise does not mean the being kept away from, but the being kept out from the tribulation. The head should be kept above the waters; they should not be ashamed, because they had kept the word of patience. It is through patience, as well as comfort of the Scripture that we have the hope which maketh not ashamed. (Comp. Romans 15:5, and Revelation 3:3-5.)

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Revelation 3:10". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/revelation-3.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Because thou hast kept the word of my patience, I also will keep thee from the hour of temptation, which shall come upon all the world, to try them that dwell upon the earth.
the word
1:9; 13:10; 14:12
I also
Matthew 6:13; 26:41; 1 Corinthians 10:13; Ephesians 6:13; 2 Peter 2:9
all
Matthew 24:14; Mark 14:9; Luke 2:1; Romans 1:8
to try
Isaiah 24:17; Daniel 12:10; Zechariah 13:9; James 3:12; 1 Peter 4:12
Reciprocal: Psalm 41:1 - time of trouble;  Psalm 119:67 - but now;  Proverbs 14:3 - but;  Proverbs 16:17 - he;  Mark 13:13 - but;  Mark 14:38 - Watch;  Luke 11:4 - lead;  Luke 21:19 - GeneralLuke 22:40 - Pray;  John 6:70 - and one;  Acts 21:13 - for;  2 Corinthians 6:4 - in much;  Philippians 4:1 - so;  1 Thessalonians 1:3 - and patience;  2 Thessalonians 3:5 - and into;  1 Timothy 1:19 - Holding;  2 Timothy 4:7 - I have kept;  Hebrews 2:18 - them;  Hebrews 11:17 - when;  Hebrews 12:1 - with patience;  1 Peter 1:7 - the trial;  2 Peter 1:10 - never;  Revelation 2:3 - hast patience;  Revelation 3:8 - and hast kept;  Revelation 16:14 - the whole

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Revelation 3:10". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/revelation-3.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

Word of my patience denotes that they had endured according to His word. As a reward for their patience the Lord will keep them or preserve them when the hour of temptation (or trial) comes. Such a promise is so far-reaching, that it could refer to the specific siege of persecution that the pagan government was about to wage against the church. or to tribulations from the world in general.

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Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on Revelation 3:10". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/revelation-3.html. 1952.

Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation

Revelation 3:10

Revelation 3:10 Because thou hast kept the word of my patience, I also will keep thee from the hour of temptation, which shall come upon all the world, to try them that dwell upon the earth.

Here followeth another word of encouragement to this Angel and Church, amplified, First, By a promise of preservation. Secondly, by a ground or reason of Christ's great favour to them. By the word of Christ's patience is meant the Gospel of Christ; so called, First, Because persecutions do attend both the preachers and professors of the gospel, which ought to be endured with patience, Colossians 1:11 as the Churches of saints did, 2 Thessalonians 1:1; 2 Thessalonians 1:4 and 2 Thessalonians 2:13-14. Secondly, because Christ Himself did patiently suffer after He had preached the gospel, and therefore it is so called the word of His patience

Kept the Word,

signifies, First, to receive the gospel or Word of God, 1 Thessalonians 1:6 and 1 Thessalonians 2:13-14, though accompanied with much affliction and persecution. Secondly, To lay it up for ourselves by faith, and so to keep it as in a treasure, Psalm 119:11 and Luke 1:66. Thirdly, To obey the gospel, and keep the ordinances of Christ in our practice, Romans 6:1-23; Romans 16:27. and 1 Corinthians 11:1-2 And, Fourthly, To hold fast the faithful Word, whatsoever tribulations and persecutions we endure for the name and gospel of Christ, 2 Timothy 1:13 and Revelation 2:13-25.

I also will keep thee from the hour of temptation.

That Isaiah, from the evil of that hour, and of those temptations. By temptation here we may understand any kind of trial; viz. of affliction, of persecution, of tribulation, and of temptation, which the Churches, the ministers and saints should suffer in those days, (especially that hour, Matthew 24:21-30) that were to come shortly after John's writing of this book, James 1:2. And by the hour of temptation is meant an indefinite time; and also a certain time, though secret and unknown to men, yet limited and appointed by the Lord, when it shall come, and how long it shall last, called an hour, to signify, that it should be but a short time, our times are in thy hand, O Lord, Psalm 31:15. The time when the Churches, their ministers and members tribulation shall begin; the time how long their trials and troubles shall last; an the time when their sorrows and sufferings shall end, is all in God's hand; that Isaiah, at the Lords appointment.

Which shall come upon all the world.

By the world, we are to understand here Caesar's world, Luke 2:1 throughout all the kingdoms, nations, and countries under the Roman Pagan emperors in every city and village, where any of the Churches of Christ were planted; God would suffer a general persecution to fall upon the Churches of saints in all parts of the world, wheresoever they were, but especially in Asia; and that whilst this Church in Philadelphia was in being: Which hour of temptation came upon the Churches and saints in the following bloody persecutions raised against them by the pagan emperors, from the evil of which temptations, this Church, ministers and members were preserved and kept.

To try them that dwell upon the earth.

By earth is meant, the saints and churches of saints that then were militant upon earth: Earth is not put here in opposition unto heaven, nor can it be so understood in this place; for the men of the world and inhabiters of the earth, were not the object of this hour or temptation, but were instruments in the persecutions of the Churches and saints that inhabited in the earth: So then, earth being contradistinguished to the Church triumphant in heaven, doth signify the Church militant here on earth, who was the object of this hour of temptation, Daniel 12:10. Many shall be purified and made white and tried, 1 Peter 4:12-14; 1 Peter 4:17 and 1 Thessalonians 2:13-15.

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Knollys, Hanserd. "Commentary on Revelation 3:10". "Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hkc/revelation-3.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Revelation 3:10. Because thou hast kept the word of my patience, I will also keep thee from the hour of temptation, which shall come upon all the world, to tempt those that dwell upon the earth. Bengel: "This is spoken to the heart! So can the Lord Jesus single out his own. When it goes hardest with the world, it shall be the best with them. Noah in his ark was borne softly through the waters, when all the world besides were engulphed around and beneath him." The word of Christ's patience, according to the common view, must be the whole range of Christian doctrine. So De Wette, "The word, which partly from its subject and spirit, and partly on account of the duty of confessing and obeying it, demands stedfastness such as is peculiar to me and my people." But the unnaturalness of this exposition is written on its very front. The word, which among many other things requires also patience, cannot be simply described as the word of patience. Far more natural is the explanation, which refers it to certain declarations of Christ, which enjoin patience and stedfastness. This is the rather to be adopted, as in other parts also of these epistles references occur to particular words of Christ contained in the Gospels, and which is the more natural, as it is Christ here also who himself speaks. For this explanation there are special reasons. As, first, that patience is frequently enjoined in the discourses of Christ, and is strongly inculcated, Luke 21:19, Luke 8:15, and especially the kernel-declaration, "He that continues (has patience) to the end, shall be saved," Matthew 10:22, Matthew 24:13. Then, again, both here, and in those original passages, patience is described as a preservative against participation in the judgments that threaten the world. He that remains stedfast in his internal separation from the world, and makes no concessions to it, he shall also be separated from it externally, he shall not suffer with it. My patience, that of Christ—comp. "the patience of Jesus Christ" in ch. Revelation 1:9.[Note: The μου here serves to confirm the reading there ἰ ησοῦ χριστοῦ, and shows the ἐ ν ἰ ησοῦ to be a gloss.]In the passages alluded to the subject discoursed of is specifically Christian patience. In Luke 21:19, for example, the patience meant is stedfastness in bearing hatred and persecution for the name of Christ This is what shall secure deliverance from the judgments which shall come upon an ungodly world. In the keeping or preserving the idea of deliverance is included. And from this is explained the: I will keep thee (exempting or delivering thee) out of, etc.[Note: The τηρεῖ ν with ἐ κ only here and John 17:15, where, on account of the preceding ἐ κ, we can hardly translate the ἐ κ by from. An explanation is given by John 12:27 : πάτερ, σῶσόν με ἐκ τῆς ὥρας ταύτης. The τηρεῖ ν is used in the Gospel of John at once of the conservative activity of believers, and of what corresponds thereto, the conservative activity of God and Christ.]What is more exactly intended by the keeping is to be understood from Revelation 3:7. According to the fuller explication there given it is of a double sort—consisting in the protection which the Lord causes to be extended to his faithful people amid the plagues that fall upon the earth, after the example of the preservation given to Israel amid the plagues that desolated Egypt; and in the enjoyment of the future inheritance of glory. Scripture usually speaks of temptations only in respect to believers, because only in their case can there be found a proper proving, so that the matter may turn out either one way or another; whereas in respect to the world, which has but one impelling principle, the result is certain from the first. Yet the idea of temptation is not on this account to be understood as having no reference whatever to the world. For it is of importance that even what may be understood of itself should be brought clearly to view, because so many are disposed to deceive themselves in regard to it, and suppose that still some other result may be attained than what is grounded in the nature of things. In Deuteronomy 4:34 the Egyptian plagues are described as temptations. So also in Deuteronomy 7:19, Deuteronomy 29:3. (Michaelis: Deus enim experiri voluit plagis suis, vellentue persistere in impietate necne.) The result of this trial stands written in ch. Revelation 9:20, Revelation 16:11-21; they did not repent of their deeds, they blasphemed God on account of the plagues, etc. While with believers the proving renders manifest their faith and love, it only serves with worldly people to bring to light their impenitence and hardness of heart, and the whole abyss of their perdition becomes naked and open to view. The "whole world," and "the inhabitants of the earth," do not of themselves indicate the non-Christian part of its people, but only in the present connection, since the Christians are to be kept out of the temptation. For we have not here a separate promise for Philadelphia, but, as is shown by ch. 7, and also by Revelation 3:9, only an individual application of what is of force throughout the whole Christian church; rendered prominent here, because the church of Philadelphia had to suffer very much for the sake of Christ, and stood especially in need of consolation. Christ sets before his people the alternative, either to suffer from the world, or to suffer with the world. Whosoever would have himself exempted from the one, he must certainly fall under the other. But he that willingly and cheerfully undergoes the former, has a refuge from the latter. The heart and centre of the whole world at that time was formed of the Roman empire, of which we must mainly (though not at all exclusively) think, on this account alone, because from it primarily proceeded the transgression, which had to be visited by the temptation; and also because it was there the Christian church, which was to be delivered from the temptation, had its seat.

Some expositors entirely fail, under the temptation, to think of a Christian persecution.

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Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on Revelation 3:10". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/revelation-3.html.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

10.My patience—So Revelation 1:9, “the patience of Jesus Christ,” (if that be an allowed reading,) namely, a patience which is his and his followers.

Hast kept’ keep thee—The faithful work has its fitting reward; the keeper shall be kept.

Hour of temptation—The Greek word for temptation may mean the presentation of agreeable inducements to sin before one’s mind, in order to elicit sin; and so the devil tempts. Or it may mean the presentation of a test or trial, adverse or agreeable, to allow the will or character to display itself. So every fearful crisis brought upon us is a temptation. And especially that great crisis which precedes the great white throne, (Revelation 20:11,) is a test, a trial, of the soul. The trial here described is mundane—upon all the world—and not in one nation or kingdom: is not merely a persecution in Asia Minor, but over the entire world, and upon all that dwell upon the earth. This is the same universality as in Revelation 1:7. The rich promise to the faithful Philadelphian is, that in that great ordeal he shall be kept from terror and despair.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Revelation 3:10". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/revelation-3.html. 1874-1909.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Revelation 3:10. The position of shows that it belongs not to as a whole, but to (2 Thessalonians 3:5). The precise sense therefore is not “my word about patience” (i.e., my counsel of patience as the supreme virtue of these latter days, so Weiss, Bousset, etc.), but “the word, or the preaching, of that patience which refers to me” (i.e., the patient endurance with which, amid present trials, Christ is to be served; so Alford, Spitta, Holtzm.). See Psalms 38 (39), 8: ; ; The second reason for praising the Philadelphian Christians is their loyal patience under persecution, as well as the loyal confession of Christ (Revelation 3:8) which had possibly brought on that persecution. . . . (“I in turn”; cf. similar connection in John 17:6-8), a reproduction of the saying preserved in Luke 21:36. The imminent period refers to the broken days which, in eschatological schemes, were to herald messiah’s return. Later on, this period is specifically defined as a time of seduction to imperial worship (cf.Revelation 13:14-17, Revelation 7:2, with Daniel 7:1, LXX). The Philadelphian Christians will not only triumph over the contempt and intrigues of their Jewish foes but also over the wider pagan trial (which is also a temptation), inasmuch as their devotion, already manifested in face of Jewish malice, will serve to carry them through the storm of Roman persecution. The reward of loyalty is in fact fresh power to be loyal on a higher level: “the wages of going on, and ever to be”. This seems better than to take the world-wide trial as the final attempt (Revelation 8:13, Revelation 11:10, etc.) to induce repentance in men or to punish them, from which the P. Christians (cf.Revelation 7:1-8, and Ps. Sol. 13:4–10, 15:6, 7) would be exempt; but it is impossible from the grammar and difficult from the sense, to decide whether means successful endurance (pregnant sense as in John 17:15) or absolute immunity (cf.2 Peter 2:9), safe emergence from the trial or escape from it entirely (thanks to the timely advent of Christ, Revelation 3:11). Note the fine double sense of : unsparing devotion is spared at least some forms of distress and disturbance. It is like Luther’s paradox that when a man learns to say with Christ, “The cross, the cross,” there is no cross. Rabbinic piety (Sanh. 98 b) expected exemption from the tribulation of the latter days only for those who were absorbed in good works and in sacred studies.

 

 

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Bibliographical Information
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Revelation 3:10". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/revelation-3.html. 1897-1910.

The Bible Study New Testament

10. Because you have kept. They lived their faith (compare James 2:14-26). They continued to proclaim the gospel. I will also keep you safe. A promise of Divine protection. Note that it goes hand in hand with “Keep safe what you have” in the next verse, The “time of trouble” comes on the earth again and again, to test people and to call them to turn to God. (Compare Revelation 16:10-11; Acts 17:30; 2 Peter 3:9.)

 

 

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Revelation 3:10". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/revelation-3.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.