Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Revelation 3:21

He who overcomes, I will grant to him to sit down with Me on My throne, as I also overcame and sat down with My Father on His throne.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Backsliders;   Decision;   Example;   Heaven;   Jesus Continued;   Laodicea;   Perseverance;   Righteous;   Throne;   War;   Scofield Reference Index - Christ;   Kingdom;   Thompson Chain Reference - Battle of Life;   Exaltation;   Exaltation-Abasement;   Exalted;   God's;   Overcomers;   Promises, Divine;   Saints;   Tempted, Promises to;   Victor, Christ as;   The Topic Concordance - Chastisement;   Government;   Jesus Christ;   Throne;   Victory/overcoming;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Christ, the King;   Reward of Saints, the;   Warfare of Saints;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Laodicea;   Throne;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Laodicea;   Son of man;   Throne;   Easton Bible Dictionary - War;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Archippus;   Cherub (1);   Jacob;   Laodicea;   Revelation of John, the;   Son of Man;   Thousand Years;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Ascension;   Laodicea;   Revelation, the Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Asia;   Gnosticism;   Laodicea;   Magi;   Throne;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Ascension;   Enoch Book of;   God;   King;   King (2);   Laodicea;   Mediator;   Revelation, Book of;   Sanctify, Sanctification;   Session;   Throne ;   Throne (2);   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Throne;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Sepharvaim;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Laodice'a;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Throne;   Triumphs;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Colossians, Epistle to the;   Revelation of John:;   Sitting;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for July 3;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

To sit with me in my throne - In every case it is to him that overcometh, to the conqueror, that the final promise is made. He that conquers not is not crowned, therefore every promise is here made to him that is faithful unto death. Here is a most remarkable expression: Jesus has conquered, and is set down with the Father upon the Father's throne; he who conquers through Christ sits down with Christ upon his throne: but Christ's throne and the throne of the Father is the same; and it is on this same throne that those who are faithful unto death are finally to sit! How astonishing is this state of exaltation! The dignity and grandeur of it who can conceive?

This is the worst of the seven Churches, and yet the most eminent of all the promises are made to it, showing that the worst may repent, finally conquer, and attain even to the highest state of glory.

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Revelation 3:21". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/revelation-3.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

To him that overcometh - See the notes on Revelation 2:7.

Will I grant to sit with me in my throne - That is, they will share his honors and his triumphs. See the notes on Revelation 2:26-27; compare the notes on Romans 8:17.

Even as I also overcame - As I gained a victory over the world, and over the power of the tempter. As the reward of this, he is exalted to the throne of the universe Philippians 2:6-11, and in these honors, achieved by their great and glorious Head, all the redeemed will share.

And am set down with my Father in his throne - Compare the notes on Philippians 2:6-11. That is, he has dominion over the universe. All things are put under his feet, and in the strictest unison and with perfect harmony he is united with the Father in administering the affairs of all worlds. The dominion of the Father is that of the Son - that of the Son is that of the Father; for they are one. See the notes on John 5:19; compare the Ephesians 1:20-22 notes; 1 Corinthians 15:24-28 notes.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Revelation 3:21". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/revelation-3.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Revelation 3:21

To him that overcometh will I grant to sit with Me.

The Christian raised to the throne of Christ

I. “To him that overcometh”; this supposes a conflict.

1. You must contend against yourself. The main battle is fought on the field of your own heart. Your closest foes are the affections which struggle there.

2. Allied with your heart and habits stands the world. God has so mercifully made us that we hail as a light upon our path the beam of kindliness in the eye of a fellow man. Even this will be turned against you.

3. But self and the world are but visible weapons of an invisible hand. Behind them, setting their edge and thrusting them home, is your great adversary the devil. Watchful when you are drowsy, plotting when you are unsuspicious, laying snares when you are tripping heedlessly, bending the bow when you are exposing your breast, he is ever going about seeking to devour.

II. Here we have a promise to stimulate us to overcome.

1. Whatever this promise means, it must mean at least that the faithful Christian will be received into the immediate presence of his Lord. And this is a thought you must set well before you.

2. But as you linger on these words of promise your heart feels that they tell of more than merely of the abundant entrance. “I will grant to sit with Me in My throne.” Ah I this seems, you think, to say that you shall be wondrously close to Him.

3. This seems to declare also that, if faithful, you shall share at last in the very honours which Invest your adorable Head.

4. But, lingering still on this rich promise, your heart gathers from it another assurance, and one that to us in our struggles is wondrous sweet. “In His throne,” you repeat, “in His throne,” what foe can approach me there? In this wide world I can find no inviolable rest. But “on His throne,” surely eternal repose dwells there.

III. Here you have the example set before you for your encouragement.

1. Your Captain does not lead you to a warfare in which He is a stranger. You will meet no foe whom He has not met.

2. Consider, then, the example of Him who passed through every kind of temptation which can assail you, and in a degree of aggravation to which it is not possible that you should be liable. His victory is the pledge of yours, for His strength is your strength, and your only foes are His vanquished assailants. (W. Arthur, M. A.)

The condition of celestial kingship

This is the promise of the ascended, victorious, crowned, and almighty Saviour to men whom He would have imitate and reproduce the life which He lived while upon the earth. This promise implies that life is a struggle with foes which assail it for the mastery. This truth has its illustrations in all forms and spheres of life. Many fail where one succeeds. The higher you rise in any sphere in life the smaller do the classes become. There are more Canadian thistles than Yosemite pines. There are more ants than eagles. There are more men who can read and write than can weigh the planets in scales and call them by name, paint a Madonna, build a Parthenon, write an epic. So there are more men who succeed in temporal pursuits than attain grand Christian characters and live a Christlike life. The first great truth implied in our text is, if men would live that higher life which is governed by the principles of the gospel and in the eternal world sit down with their Lord and Master on His throne, they must resist the temptations which assail them, vanquish the foes which would destroy them. The dangers which beset each one in this life-battle are special. The rock on which your neighbour struck, the reef on which your friend lies stranded, may not imperil your safety because you are steering in another direction. There are men whose integrity money could not buy, in whose keeping the uncounted millions of the mints and treasury of the nations would be safe. But there are others who are ready at any moment to part with reputation, character, aye, sell their very souls for its possession. Take spirituous liquor. There are some to whom in any form it is as distasteful as vitriol, as poisonous as croton oil. There are others--God pity them!--in whom the appetite is so fierce, powerful, overmastering, that if they saw a glass of rum on one side of the mouth of hell, and they stood on the other side, they would leap across, at the risk of falling in, to get it. There are two things which differentiate and specialise each human being’s danger. The first is natural constitution. No one denies the law of heredity, that physical resemblances, mental aptitudes, and moral qualities are transmissible, and sometimes travel down family and national lines for centuries. But while a man may inherit tainted blood and receive a legacy of disabilities from his progenitors, it does not relieve him from personal responsibility. What are the weak points in your character? In the presence of what temptations do you most easily surrender? Along what lines does your constitutional predisposition to wrongdoing lie? As you confront these weaknesses the command of the great Saviour of souls is, “Overcome.” On this your salvation depends. The second thing which differentiates and specialises each man’s peril is providential circumstances. John Stuart Mill was carefully trained by his father in childhood and boyhood in the principles of atheism. Young Mill had no voice in determining the character of his childhood instruction. But did that fact relieve the future philosopher of responsibility in adhering to and teaching others the principles of atheism? Your greatest peril may lie wrapped up in some providential event which you had no voice in shaping and which you must meet. It may be money. It may be family alliances. It may be social relationships. It may be a business crisis--such a business crisis as sometimes reveals the whole moral mechanism of the man. I know not whether your inherited qualities of mind and moral aptitudes are helps or hindrances to you in life’s battle. I do not know the revealing tests to which a searching Providence may subject you. But I do know that special dangers lie along your pathway and menace your eternal well-being; dangers which you must conquer if you would enter yonder pearly gate and sit down with your Lord on His throne. The text affords glorious encouragement in the blessed assurance that it is possible for men in this life-battle to overcome. The success possible in the text rests on surer foundations than human resources or individual reserve power. It rests on the truthfulness and sincerity of Jesus. He does not mock men by laying down impossible conditions of salvation. That God is on the side of the man who is struggling to preserve his purity, maintain his integrity, and vanquish what is wrong both within him and without him, is a truth taught with increasing clearness from Eden to Calvary. Observe the greatness and grandeur of the reward of him who overcomes: “To him that overcometh will I grant to sit with Me in My throne.” Can you conceive of a greater incentive to be offered man than this promise of eternal participation in the regal splendours of heaven? Turning to the practical suggestions of this subject, notice that religion is a personal matter which has to do with individual character. Each one must overcome the obstacles which lie in his pathway. Yea can never understand how much Christ is to men until you realise your danger, feel your helplessness, and experience His saving power. You can never appreciate the towering sublimity of His peerless life until you attempt to walk in His footsteps and regulate your life by the same principles which controlled His life. The essence of the Christian religion is life, life shaped and controlled by supreme love to God and love for fellow-men equal to the love cherished for self. (T. McCullagh, D. D.)

The conqueror’s reward

I. The character of the Christian. It is that of a soldier--a successful soldier. His life is a warfare. It was such unquestionably in the days of the apostles. And what is the case now? The antipathy of the carnal mind may be restrained or softened by the influence of knowledge and the force of conviction, but the fact is still patent that we must take up our cross if we will win the crown. Our enemies within, whatever they may be without, am neither few nor weak. And to subvert our eternal salvation is the one thing in which they are all united. We have, therefore, the greatest need of caution and courage. One thing must be ever borne in mind, namely, our constant dependence upon God. As long as we abide beneath the wing of Omnipotence we are secure.

II. The reward which shall be adjudged to the successful warrior. He shall sit down with the Saviour on His throne.

1. The promise may be understood to shadow forth the future dignity of the conquering Christian. He shalt sit down with his Lord, and on the same throne. The faithful unto death shall thus be exalted above the angels of God.

2. The imagery in the promise is intended to indicate the future holiness of the saints. Wherever God is there is purity itself.

3. The promise before us is expressive of the future happiness of believers. There we shall behold a sky without a cloud, light without shadow, and flowers without a thorn. (American National Preacher.)

The victory and the crown

I. The battle. Common life in this world is a warfare.

1. It is inner warfare, private, solitary, with no eye upon the warrior.

2. It is outer warfare. The enemies are legion.

3. It is daily warfare; not one great battle, but a multitude of battles. The enemy wearies not, ceases not, nor must we.

4. It is warfare not fought with human arms.

5. It is warfare in which we are sharers with Christ.

II. The victory. Here it is spoken of as one great final victory, but in reality it is a multitude. As are the battles so are the victories.

III. The reward.

1. A throne. Not salvation merely, or life, but higher than these--glory, honour, dominion, and power. From being the lowest here they are made the highest hereafter.

2. Christ’s throne. He has a seat on the Father’s throne as the reward of His victory, we have a seat on His as the reward of ours. We are sharers or “partakers with Christ” in all things. We share His battles, His victories, His rewards, His cross, and His crown. (H. Bonar, D. D.)

The great victory

I. A life of Christian holiness is possible.

II. It is not to be sustained without vigorous and persevering efforts.

1. The natural inaptitude and aversion of the unrenewed heart to the things of God and eternal life.

2. The world is against us.

3. The life of man is often the scene of distress.

III. The encouragements to a holy and Christian life held out to us in the religion of Jesus are manifold and great.

1. In this arduous undertaking we are not left without assistance.

2. Multitudes of our fellow-men have already accomplished salvation, and are for ever with the Lord.

3. Whatever of warfare and pain may attend the Christian life they who maintain it are already the happiest of men.

4. Viewed aright it is matter of encouragement that the strife will soon be over.

5. What a vast reward awaits the faithful. (James Bromley.)

The Christian conqueror

The word used here for “conqueror” does not imply one who has conquered. It is literally, “He that is conquering I will give to him to sit with Me.” While the battle is raging he shall have My peace, while he is but starting he shall be at the goal--as the boy has his prizes and his scholarships not because he is a finished scholar but because he is longing and learning to be one. And as this continues all through life to be the law of life, so in the kingdom that is coming effort is victory and victory is only encouragement. (Abp. Benson.)

Overcoming

“To him that overcometh.” There is a tendency very common which these words may be taken to warn us against--that of settling down to the daily round of our lives without appeal to anything high or holy in purpose. Do not listen for a moment to those who tell you that the struggle is not worth engaging in. “To him that overcometh.” Men have tried different ways to accomplish this. A favourite way in the history of the early Christian Church was to withdraw actually from the world, to seek the solitude of some cave or monastery. Others who would think it very wrong to do this, spend the greater part of their leisure in attending religious meetings and reading their Bibles, and tell you that the chief end of man in this world is by these methods to prepare for the next. Both of these attempts to overcome the world are based on a misconception. The text says to us that we are to overcome the world even as I (Jesus) overcame. Now in what way did our Saviour overcome the world? Not after the manner of the religious ascetic. His life was in the main lived among ordinary men and women in the ordinary vocations of life. If the life of Jesus had been that of a hermit or a monk, He would never have been called a friend of publicans and sinners. If, again, He had been a constant attendant at religious meetings, noonday, and evening, or had divided His life between keenness for this world’s success in money-making and eagerness for the salvation of His soul for the next, He would never have been put to death. No, it was because He was so zealous to overcome the world--the world of religious selfishness and of worldly selfishness alike--it was because He was devoting Himself amid the ordinary pursuits of life to bring about the kingdom of God. It is, of course, not to be forgotten that there are means, such as the reading of the Bible, attendance on public worship, prayer, and fellowship with those who are like-minded, which, if rightly used, will help us for the battle we have to fight. It is by forgetting that these are only means that men become hypocrites, and the form of religion becomes the all in all. When we realise what Christ meant by “the world” and what He meant by the kingdom of God, we will take a more enlightened view of what our duty is, and we will strive more eagerly to achieve the victory. Think of how many men and women are hindered from overcoming the world--that is, sin in all its forms--by the conditions under which they are made by a selfish society to live. How can men and women hope to realise the Christlike life if they are forced to toil from morning to night, and then to sleep in badly ventilated houses, only to rise again to the same round of unrelieved drudgery? Those who to-day are endeavouring to bring about a better state of affairs, who are trying to realise to some small degree that part of the kingdom of God which consists in better houses and more healthful surroundings for the toilers in our midst are doing quite as much to enable men to overcome the world--the world of vice, of drunkenness, of coarseness--as those who attend to what are considered more strictly the needs of the soul. There is another idea in the text: “To him that overcometh.” That is the battle. The reward follows: “I will give him to sit down with Me in My throne.” It was because Christ had so completely overcome--had so unreservedly rendered up His own will to the will of His Heavenly Father--that we find such a royal, kingly sense of self-conquest pervading His entire life. Jesus Christ could not have brought so much of the kingdom of God into this world, He could not have foreseen with so much confidence a time when it would be universally established, had He not had it reigning within Himself. Throughout His life there was an air of kingly majesty that makes Him as secure as if He sat and reigned upon a throne, while all around Him seemed to indicate defeat and disaster. Whence did this come but from His oneness with the Father? Whence can we hope to receive it but from the same high, never-failing source? (W. Martin.)

A commonwealth of kings

When Cyneas, the ambassador of Pyrrhus, after his return from Rome, was asked by his master, “What he thought of the city and state,” he answered, “that it seemed to him to be a state of none but great statesmen, and a commonwealth of kings.” Such is heaven--no other than a parliament of emperors, a commonwealth of kings: every humble faithful soul in that kingdom is co-heir with Christ, hath a robe of honour, and a sceptre of power, and a throne of majesty, and a crown of glory. (J. Spencer.)

The future dominion of victors

“So you intend to be a reformer of men’s morals, young man,” said an aged peer to Wilberforce. “That,” and he pointed to a picture of the crucifixion, “that is the end of reformers.” “Is it? I have read in an old Book this, ‘I am He that liveth, and was dead; and behold, I am alive for evermore, Amen; and have the keys of hell and of death.’ That is the end, not death, but dominion. And if we be faithful, doing our duty, the end shall not be exhaustion, but ‘sit with Me on My throne.’“ (Sunday School Chronicle.)

The Christian promise of empire

“To him that overcometh will I grant to sit with Me on My throne.” These words bear the stamp of their environment. They were written at a time when the ideal of all men was the possession of a throne. Alike to the Roman and to the Jew the dream of life was the dream of dominion. The son of Israel contemplated his Messiah who should make him ruler over all nations. The son of Rome was eager to complete his almost finished work of universal empire. But from another point of view it was in striking contrast to both. Who were the men that claimed to be the recipients of this promise? A baud of obscure slaves. To the proud Roman leading his armies to victory, to the proud Jew counting his ancestors by hundreds, there must have been something almost grotesque in the claim. Must it not to the age in which they lived have appeared the presumption of insanity? Nor is it only to a Roman age that the claim of this passage seems to suggest the idea of presumption. Must it not appear so at all times to every man? The throne, as I have said, is a throne of judgment. How can any human soul aspire to such a seat? Is not the state of the Christian one of humility? Does not the amount of the humility increase in proportion as the Christianity grows? Have not the most purely spiritual souls been precisely those most conscious of their sin? It is in the incipient stages of the Christian life that we find ambition. But let us look deeper. I think we shall find that we have altogether mistaken the meaning of the passage, and that the John of the Apocalypse is nowhere more like the John of the Gospel than in his present claim to Christian empire. So far from being influenced by the old feeling of presumption, he is actuated by the direct desire to avoid that feeling. His position is that, instead of being presumption to claim a seat on God’s judgment throne, it is presumption that prevents the Church of Laodicea from having a right to claim it. If that Church would adopt more humility, it would be more entitled to a place on the throne. “Thou sayest, I am rich, and increased with goods, and have need of nothing; and knowest not that thou art wretched, and miserable, and poor, and blind, and naked.” What is the state of mind here indicated? It is poverty unconscious of itself. It is the description of a Church which has no elements of strength within it, but which believes itself to be strong just because it has never been tried. Accordingly in verse 18 He says, “I counsel thee to buy of Me gold tried in the fire, that thou mayest be rich.” Nothing could reveal the weakness but exposure to the fire And first, let us consider that, as a matter of fact, every man has seated himself on a throne of judgment. The difference between the Christian and the non-Christian is not the occupation of a throne. It is that the occupation of the one is legal, and the occupation of the other usurped. Every man by nature has constituted himself the judge of other men. But to all such the seer of Patmos exclaims, “Come down from that throne; you have no right to be there; you have not overcome.” He tells them that until they have felt the temptations of their own nature they are in no condition to judge others. Now, the next question is, what would be the effect of what is here called overcoming--of vanquishing the temptation? It would clearly be to transform a throne of judgment into a throne of grace. For, be it observed, the value of overcoming is not the victory but the struggle. There are two ways in which a man may reach freedom from temptation--by innocence or by virtue, by never having known or by having known and vanquished. If mere freedom from temptation were the goal, we ought to be content with the first. What makes the overcoming better than the innocence is the fact that in struggle we learn our weakness, and that in learning our weakness the throne of judgment becomes a throne of mercy. And now the passage takes a remarkable turn. To the inspired ear of the seer of Patmos the Christ who offers the conditions of empire is heard declaring that He Himself has reached empire by conforming to these conditions, “even as I also overcame and am set down with My Father on His throne.” There is something startling here. There seems at first sight to be no analogy between the case of Christ and the case of ordinary men. Now, Jesus was tempted; that is one of the cardinal features of the gospel. He was tempted in such a way as to make Him feel the inherent weakness of humanity; that is one of the cardinal features of the Epistle to the Hebrews. But He was tempted also “without sin.” The idea clearly is that His right to judge others rests morally on the fact of His own struggle the struggle with the thought of death. In His dealings with man He acknowledges no power but the sympathetic. And what is the root of universal sympathy? Is it not universal experience? If I would have sympathy with all nations, I must know experimentally the weakness with which all nations contend. Jesus emerges from the conflict with death wider in His human capabilities, stronger in His hold on man. He is able to promise rest to the labouring and the heavy-laden because He has known a kindred labour and felt an analogous ladenness. He has made the law of the Christian life the law of His own spirit: “I also have overcome, and am set down with My Father on His throne.” (George Matheson, D. D.)

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Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Revelation 3:21". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/revelation-3.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

He that overcometh, I will give to him to sit down with me in my throne, as I also overcame, and sat down with my Father in his throne.

Plummer, and many others, see two thrones in this passage. "The throne promised is not that which Christ now occupies with his Father, but his own throne."[73] However, there is only one supreme throne. "God's throne is Christ's."[74] As we shall see in the next two chapters, Christ is now completely and gloriously enthroned. The notion of two thrones in this passage must be rejected. "God knows no other victory, and needs no other victory, than that which is won by the cross of Christ."[75]

To sit down with me in my throne ... "This promise of sharing the throne is the climax of an ascending series of glorious promises which carry us from the Garden of Eden to the throne of God in heaven."[76]

Many do not seem to believe that Christians are now sharing the throne with Christ, but in a sense they are; despite the fact of this interpretation being merely the type of the glory that shall come later at the Second Advent (which is also in view here). Howard stated it thus: "Christians reign with Christ as his agents in proclaiming Christ's authority for man's salvation."[77] Hinds' great summary of the thought here is:

As Christians are agents through whom men are saved (1 Timothy 4:16), so they are agents through whom Christ reigns. Hence, they sit with him in his throne, that is, rule with him. It is called the Father's throne because he gave it to Christ; it is Christ's because he sits upon it; it is the throne of David, because Christ, a Davidic descendant, sits upon it. Moreover, only one throne is supreme, that "of God and of the Lamb" (Revelation 22:1).[78]

[73] A. Plummer, op. cit., p. 118.

[74] James Moffatt, op. cit., p. 373.

[75] G. B. Caird, op. cit., p. 58.

[76] W. Boyd Carpenter, op. cit., p. 551.

[77] G. T. Howard, Revelation (Dallas: Christian Publishing Company, 1966), p. 28.

[78] John T. Hinds, op. cit., p. 65.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Revelation 3:21". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/revelation-3.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

To him that overcometh,.... The lukewarmness, and self-confidence, and security of this state:

will I grant to sit with me in my throne; at the close of this church state, which will be the last of this kind, consisting of imperfect saints, Christ will descend from heaven with the souls of all the righteous, and raise their bodies and unite them to them; which, with the living saints, will make one general assembly and church of the firstborn, all perfect soul and body; among these he will place his tabernacle, and fix his throne; and they being all made kings as well as priests to him, shall now reign on earth with him, and that for the space of a thousand years: and this is the blessing promised the overcomers in the Laodicean state, that when Christ shall set up his kingdom among men, and reign gloriously before his ancients, they shall sit on the same throne with him, or share with him in his kingdom and glory; see Revelation 5:10,

even as I also overcame; sin, Satan, the world, death, and hell:

and am set down with my Father in his throne; in heaven, at his right hand; which is expressive of equality to him, distinction from him, communion with him, and of the honour and glory he is possessed of; but it is not on this throne that the saints will sit, only Christ sits on the same throne with the Father in heaven; it is on Christ's throne on earth, or in his personal reign there, that the saints shall sit down with him; and which honour they shall all have, all that are more than conquerors through him, and are made kings by him. And when this reign is over, then will follow the second resurrection, or the resurrection of the wicked, when will come on the judgment of the people, as Laodicea signifies; and when these, with the devils, will form themselves into the Gog and Magog army, and attack the beloved city, the church of glorified saints on earth, under Christ their King, which will issue in the everlasting destruction of the former; and thus these seven churches bring us to the end of all things.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Revelation 3:21". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/revelation-3.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

15 To him that overcometh will I grant to sit with me in my throne, even as I also overcame, and am set down with my Father in his throne.

(15) The conclusion, consisting of a promise, as in (Revelation 2:26) and of an exhortation.
Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Revelation 3:21". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/revelation-3.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

sit with me in my throne — (Revelation 2:26, Revelation 2:27; Revelation 20:6; Matthew 19:28; Matthew 20:23; John 17:22, John 17:24; 2 Timothy 2:12). The same whom Christ had just before threatened to spue out of His mouth, is now offered a seat with Him on His throne! “The highest place is within reach of the lowest; the faintest spark of grace may be fanned into the mightiest flame of love” [Trench].

even as I also — Two thrones are here mentioned: (1) His Father‘s, upon which He now sits, and has sat since His ascension, after His victory over death, sin, the world; upon this none can sit save God, and the God-man Christ Jesus, for it is the incommunicable prerogative of God alone; (2) the throne which shall be peculiarly His as the once humbled and then glorified Son of man, to be set up over the whole earth (heretofore usurped by Satan) at His coming again; in this the victorious saints shall share (1 Corinthians 6:2). The transfigured elect Church shall with Christ judge and reign over the nations in the flesh, and Israel the foremost of them; ministering blessings to them as angels were the Lord‘s mediators of blessing and administrators of His government in setting up His throne in Israel at Sinai. This privilege of our high calling belongs exclusively to the present time while Satan reigns, when alone there is scope for conflict and for victory (2 Timothy 2:11, 2 Timothy 2:12). When Satan shall be bound (Revelation 20:4), there shall be no longer scope for it, for all on earth shall know the Lord from the least to the greatest. This, the grandest and crowning promise, is placed at the end of all the seven addresses, to gather all in one. It also forms the link to the next part of the book, where the Lamb is introduced seated on His Father‘s throne (Revelation 4:2, Revelation 4:3; Revelation 5:5, Revelation 5:6). The Eastern throne is broad, admitting others besides him who, as chief, occupies the center. Trench notices; The order of the promises in the seven epistles corresponds to that of the unfolding of the kingdom of God its first beginnings on earth to its consummation in heaven. To the faithful at Ephesus: (1) The tree of life in the Paradise of God is promised (Revelation 2:7), answering to Genesis 2:9. (2) Sin entered the world and death by sin; but to the faithful at Smyrna it is promised, they shall not be hurt by the second death (Revelation 2:11). (3) The promise of the hidden manna (Revelation 2:17) to Pergamos brings us to the Mosaic period, the Church in the wilderness. (4) That to Thyatira, namely, triumph over the nations (Revelation 2:26, Revelation 2:27), forms the consummation of the kingdom in prophetic type, the period of David and Solomon characterized by this power of the nations. Here there is a division, the seven falling into two groups, four and three, as often, for example, the Lord‘s Prayer, three and four. The scenery of the last three passes from earth to heaven, the Church contemplated as triumphant, with its steps from glory to glory. (5) Christ promises to the believer of Sardis not to blot his name out of the book of life but to confess him before His Father and the angels at the judgment-day, and clothe him with a glorified body of dazzling whiteness (Revelation 3:4, Revelation 3:5). (6) To the faithful at Philadelphia Christ promises they shall be citizens of the new Jerusalem, fixed as immovable pillars there, where city and temple are one (Revelation 3:12); here not only individual salvation is promised to the believer, as in the case of Sardis, but also privileges in the blessed communion of the Church triumphant. (7) Lastly, to the faithful of Laodicea is given the crowning promise, not only the two former blessings, but a seat with Christ on His throne, even as He has sat with His Father on His Father‘s throne (Revelation 3:21).

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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 3:21". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/revelation-3.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

He that overcometh (ο νικωνho nikōn). Absolute nominative again as in Revelation 3:12, but resumed this time by the dative αυτωιautōi as in Revelation 2:26.

To sit (κατισαιkathisai). First aorist active infinitive of κατιζωkathizō This promise grows out of the prophecy that the saints will share in the Messiah‘s rule, made to the twelve (Matthew 19:28; Luke 22:29.), repeated by Paul (1 Corinthians 6:2.), enlarged in Revelation 22:1-5 (to last forever, 2 Timothy 2:11.). James and John took this hope and promise literally (Mark 10:40) not metaphorically.

As I also overcame (ως καγω ενικησαhōs kagō enikēsa). First aorist active indicative of νικαωnikaō looking back on the victory as over in the past. In John 16:33 before the Cross Jesus says Εγω νενικηκα τον κοσμονEgō nenikēka ton kosmon (perfect active), emphasizing the abiding effect of the victory.

Sat down (εκατισαekathisa). “I took my seat” (Hebrews 1:3) where Christ is now (Revelation 22:3; Colossians 3:1). Cf. 1 John 5:4; Revelation 2:27. Each of these seven messages begins alike and ends alike. Each is the message of the Christ and of the Holy Spirit to the angel of the church. Each has a special message suited to the actual condition of each church. In each case the individual who overcomes has a promise of blessing. Christ the Shepherd knows his sheep and lays bare the particular peril in each case.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Revelation 3:21". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/revelation-3.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

He that overcometh

See on Revelation 2:7.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 3:21". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/revelation-3.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

To him that overcometh will I grant to sit with me in my throne, even as I also overcame, and am set down with my Father in his throne.

I will give him to sit with me on my throne — In unspeakable happiness and glory. Elsewhere, heaven itself is termed the throne of God: but this throne is in heaven.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Revelation 3:21". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/revelation-3.html. 1765.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

21.] He that conquereth (see above, ch. Revelation 2:26, and Revelation 3:12, for the construction), I will give to him to sit (in the blessed life of glory hereafter: such promises cannot be regarded, as this by some, as partially fulfilled in this life: for thus the following analogy, ὡς κἀγὼ κ. τ. λ., would fail. The final and complete act is also pointed out by the aor. καθίσαι) with me (cf. John 17:24, πάτερ, ὃ δέδωκας ἐμοὶ θέλω ἵνα ὅπου εἰμὶ ἐγὼ κἀκεῖνοι ὦσιν μετʼ ἐμοῦ) on my throne (have a share in My kingly power, as ch. Revelation 2:27, Revelation 20:6), as I also conquered and sat down with my Father on His throne (the aorr. refer to the historical facts of the Resurrection and Ascension. By the latter, Christ sat down at the right hand of God, or of the throne of God, as Hebrews 12:2. No distinction must be made between the throne of the Father, on which Christ sits, and that of Christ, on which the victorious believer is to sit with Him: they are one and the same, cf. ἐκ τοῦ θρόνου τοῦ θεοῦ καὶ τοῦ ἀρνίου, ch. Revelation 22:1; and the glory of the redeemed will be a participation in that of the Father and the Son, John 17:22).

Doubtless the occurrence of this, the highest and most glorious of all the promises, in this place, is to be explained not entirely from any especial aptness to the circumstances of the Laodicean church, though such has been attempted to be assigned (e. g. by Ebrard—because the victory over luke-warmness would be so much more difficult than that in any other case), but also from the fact of its occurring at the end of all the Epistles, and as it were gathering them all into one. It must not be forgotten too, that the ἐκάθισα μετὰ τοῦ πατρός μου ἐν τῷ θρόνῳ αὐτοῦ forms a link to the next part of the book where we so soon, ch. Revelation 5:6, read καὶ εἶδον ἐν τῷ μέσῳ τοῦ θρόνου.… ἀρνίον ἑστηκὸς ὡς ἐσφαγμένον.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Revelation 3:21". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/revelation-3.html. 1863-1878.

Scofield's Reference Notes

Father

This passage, in harmony with Luke 1:32; Luke 1:33; Matthew 19:28; Acts 2:30; Acts 2:34; Acts 2:35; Acts 15:14-16 is conclusive that Christ is not now seated upon His own throne. The Davidic Covenant, and the promises of God through the prophets and Angle Gabriel concerning the Messianic kingdom await fulfilment.

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Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Revelation 3:21". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/revelation-3.html. 1917.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

THE CHRISTIAN CONQUEROR

‘He that overcometh I will give to him to sit down with Me in My throne.’

Revelation 3:21 (R.V.)

This is the last of seven honours set before the Christian conquerors in the epistles to the seven Churches, and the throne of which this blessing speaks is itself described in St. John’s next vision. What are the plain realities which underlie the imagery? But we see at once that this throne means the centre of Creation, that the glory of it is as of One invisible, and except by His own will unknowable, and that in that heart and centre of all things lives One who has suffered, One who has died, One who is and who ever has remained sinless: the Lamb that has been slain and dieth no more is in the midst of the throne. Perfect sympathy with pain, perfect deliverance from evil, are there in absolute life and light, and the Lamb, the Victor-victim, speaks and says, ‘He that overcometh I will give to him to sit with Me in My throne, even as I also overcame and sat down with My Father in His throne.’

I. He that overcometh.—When St. John wrote, people like that faithful martyr, Antipas, were overcoming by their own blood, and the whole apocalypse shows a world about to be red with martyrdoms. Yet even then the word overcoming is used in these seven brief letters in connection with trials and difficulties which were not necessarily to end with them. That was only the supreme method of solving such problems of life as were otherwise insoluble. There were final conflicts in those days in which the forces of God and of the world were grappled together in the lives of men: the spirits of light and darkness incarnated themselves in men’s daily action in forms so violent that he who meant to give God the victory in His own life could often do it only by giving his own life over to the death. But if the extremity of the struggle is not now commonly suffered to work itself out to the same bitter end—with the knowledge of the onlooking world it never could be suffered now—yet similar and sometimes the same problems have to be solved in men’s lives still, and still the Christian is called to overcome, and still he can often be victor only by being first a victim as the Lamb was, and if he overcomes, his place is still henceforth the centre of all things. He sits with Him on the throne in true sympathy with the pain of this world, and also having himself a share in this world’s deliverance from pain and from all evil.

II. The word used here for conqueror does not imply one who has conquered. It is not in the flush of triumph that Christ assures to us His throne: it is literally, ‘He that is conquering, I will give to him to sit with Me.’ While the battle is raging he shall have My peace; while he is but starting he shall be at the goal—as the boy has his prizes and his scholarships, not because he is a finished scholar, but because he is longing and learning to be one. And as this continues all through life to be the law of life, so in the kingdom that is coming effort is victory, and victory is only encouragement.

III. What, then, are these problems, which once could only be solved by readiness to die for the right solution, and which still present themselves for solution—for solutions, on the rightness and wrongness of which, almost all, if not all, about us depends? There are the problems seemingly outside of our own lives; there are the expenses of civilisation to be met—the expenses of civilisation, about which it is so hard to say how far they are necessary and likely to continue; while it is essential that we should make the very utmost efforts, and yet none but holy efforts, to reduce them. Such problems when St. John wrote were all the awful wickedness of the age, the conventional false worships, which were then the cementing of the State and of all society, slavery, gladiator shows, one vast licentiousness of life. Men and women died freely in combating such things, for there was that within them which was a perpetual war with the spirit of these things. Among the problems outside us are such expenses of civilisation still: licentiousness of life, the classes that are sacrificed to it, the tender age of corruption. Again, the miserable, unclean, indecent abodes which are all that civilised towns and villages offer and grudge to their myriads or their hundreds. Again, our submissiveness to wealth, and our submissiveness to numbers, and our extreme difficulty in the way of simplicity of life or of speech; and now, even now, the ancient difficulty seeming to begin again, of how to live and talk and think Christianly among unbelievers. The duty and the necessity of taking some steps in solution of these problems has never ceased to be, and is not ceasing to be, most pressing. The circumstances which envelop some of them are as full of horror as ever they were in the old world; and yet some such horror seems to be the youngest offspring of progress. And so great is the obscurity on others of them that we cannot see whether they are accidental or essential to that progress. There are among us those whose earnestness to solve these problems at any cost to themselves, is not less than the eagerness which embraced death rather than not bear witness to the truth. And if it seems that Christian society with us is not with sufficient activity and pronouncedly enough scattering the remnants of heathenism and their freshest recombinations, that can only be because individual Christians are not active enough in combination and decided enough in their tone. It is the individual which rules the social after all. One who does his own honest part in healing the world’s sorrow and lightening the world’s burdens, and is not ashamed to say he does it for Christ, he is the overcoming one who helps to solve the world’s greatest problems. That is the part which must be greater in the world to come than it can be now. For we shall not find ourselves able to do these things except in the spirit of Christ.

Archbishop Benson.

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Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Revelation 3:21". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/revelation-3.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

21 To him that overcometh will I grant to sit with me in my throne, even as I also overcame, and am set down with my Father in his throne.

Ver. 21. To sit with me in my throne] The thrones of those eastern kings were large and capacious, after the manner of a couch, set on high and covered with tapestry, so that besides the king’s own room, others whom the king would honour might sit by him in the same throne. (Lud. de Dieu. in loc.) And hereunto our Saviour seemeth here to allude. This honour he promiseth to him that overcometh, as Alexander the Great by his last will left his dominions τω κρατιστω, to the worthiest of his princes, to him that should best deserve it.

And he with me] Christ is no niggardly or beggarly guest. His reward is with him, he brings better commodities than Abraham’s servant did, or the Queen of Sheba, gold, raiment, eyesalve, &c.

Even as I also] That is, because I also overcame, by virtue of my victory, ως for οτι. See the like John 17:2; Luke 4:36. It is by Christ that we do exceedingly overcome, Romans 8:37.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Revelation 3:21". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/revelation-3.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Revelation 3:21

The Close of the Year.

I. "He that overcometh." Then there is light shining in and struggling with the darkness—a conflict year-long and lifelong, which, though it has its defeats, may have its victories also, which, though its outward aspect is gloomy, may issue in glory, and honour, and immortality. Years bring us another lesson than the lesson of discouragement. Though much is taken away, much is also gained—gained by that very loss. The past has become for us full of rich and precious store: lessons of self-distrust; lessons of charitable thought; lessons of reliance on God. If we have lost bloom, we have gathered ripeness. The future has opened and widened before us. It is no longer the book of dark things, closed and put by till our play is over: the page lies open before us on the desk of life's business; though much in it is hidden, much is revealed to our inner sight, which solemnises us, and stirs us to action. It is no longer the great unknown land talked of as a dream and a mystery, but we are plying our voyage thither, standing at watch, and holding the helm. Already we begin to see its tokens float past us, and to scent the gales which come from its fields. And the present—we have learned to distrust it and to question its testimony, have become wiser than to encumber by loading ourselves with its fading flowers; we search for pearls that shall endure.

II. "Who is he that overcometh the world but he that believeth that Jesus is the Son of God?" Here, again, as years pass on we want more of Him, a firmer reliance on His work and His word, to stand among things visible and endure as seeing the invisible. If we would be gaining this victory, we must labour hard for knowledge and obedience, and every way for a greater realising of Christ. Our text is not only an implication of the possibility of victory: it is also a promise to the victor. The Author and Finisher of our faith Himself proclaims it, Himself offers to the conquerors a prize, and pledges for it His own word: "To him that overcometh will I grant to sit with Me in My throne."

H. Alford, Quebec Chapel Sermons, vol. v., p. 319.


The Christian Conqueror.

This is the last of seven honours set before the Christian conquerors in the epistles to the seven Churches; and the throne of which this blessing speaks is itself described in St. John's next vision. We know what a throne it was which he saw unveil itself before him. We see at once that this throne means the centre of creation; that the glory of it is as of One invisible, and, except by His own will, unknowable; and that in that heart and centre of all things lives One who has suffered, One who has died, One who is and who ever has remained sinless: the Lamb that had been slain and dieth no more is in the midst of the throne. Perfect sympathy with pain, perfect deliverance from evil, are there in absolute life and light; and the Lamb, the Victor-Victim, speaks, and says, "He that overcometh, I will give to him to sit down with Me in My throne, even as I also overcame and sat down with My Father in His throne."

I. He that overcometh. When St. John wrote, people, like that faithful martyr Antipas, were overcoming by their own blood, and the whole Apocalypse shows a world about to be red with martyrdoms. Yet even then the word "overcoming" is used in these seven brief letters in connection with trials and difficulties which were not necessarily to end with them. That was only the supreme method of solving such problems of life as were otherwise insoluble. There were final conflicts in those days in which the forces of God and of the world were grappled together in the lives of men; the spirits of light and darkness incarnated themselves in men's daily action in forms so violent that he who meant to give God the victory in his own life could often do it only by giving his own life over to the death. But if the extremity of the struggle is not now commonly suffered to work itself out to the same bitter end—with the knowledge of the onlooking world, it never could be suffered now—yet similar, and sometimes the same, problems have to be solved in men's lives still, and still the Christian is called to overcome, and still he can often be victor only by being first a victim, as the Lamb was; and if he overcomes, his place is still henceforth the centre of all things. He sits with Him on the throne in true sympathy with the pain of this world, and also having himself a share in this world's deliverance from pain and from all evil.

II. What, then, are these problems which once could only be solved by readiness to die for the right solution, and which still present themselves for solutions—for solutions on the rightness or wrongness of which almost all, if not all, about us depends? Such problems when St. John wrote were all the awful wickedness of the age; the conventional false worships which were then the cementing of the State and of all society; slavery; gladiator shows; one vast licentiousness of life. Men and women died freely in combating such things, for there was that within them which was a perpetual war with the spirit of these things. Among the problems outside us are such expenses of civilisation still: licentiousness of life; the classes that are sacrificed to it; the tender age of corruption; again, the miserable, unclean, indecent abodes which are all that civilised towns and villages offer, and grudge, to their myriads or their hundreds; again, our submissiveness to wealth, and our submissiveness to numbers, and our extreme difficulty in the way of simplicity of life or of speech, and now, even now, the ancient difficulty seeming to begin again of how to live, and talk, and think Christianly among unbelievers. One who does his own honest part in healing the world's sorrow and lightening the world's burdens, and is not ashamed to say he does it for Christ—he is the overcoming one who helps to solve the world's greatest problems. That is the part which must be greater in the world to come than it can be now; for we shall not find ourselves able to do these things except in the spirit of Christ.

Archbishop Tait, Family Churchman, May 23rd, 1883.

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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Revelation 3:21". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/revelation-3.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Revelation 3:21. Will I grant to sit with me in my throne, The accomplishment of this promise is declared, ch. Revelation 20:4. We only observe, that notwithstanding this angel is described with the worst character of all the seven, yet the most glorious of all the promises is applied to him; to shew, that, upon repentance, the way to glory lies open to him by overcoming, as well as to the rest. Now, though the attributes of the promises be mentioned, distributing to each of the seven angels, some one, some another, different, as to the symbols, from the rest; yet all these, in the application, as the titles of Christ are to be taken, shall be collectively bestowed and concentered in each of those respective persons who have obtained them by overcoming. De Dieu observes, that the thrones in the east are broad and wide, something like a bed, raised a little above the earth, and adorned with tapestry; so that, besides the seat peculiar to the king, others, whom he designs to honour, have sufficient room to be seated on the throne with him. See ch. Revelation 5:9-10.

Inferences.—Alas! how common is the character of the church of Sardis, and of those who have only a name to live, while they are dead? But the more general the prevalence of such an indolent temper is, the more let us emulate the distinguished honour of those few names in Sardis, which had not defiled their garments; that we may walk with them; and with Christ, in white raiment; that we may arrive at that happy state of everlasting purity, of everlasting festivity, of everlasting triumph, which our divine Master has encouraged us to expect. We know not how unexpectedly he may come upon us: let us be always ready, always strenuous in maintaining a holy war against the enemies of our salvation; and then we shall conquer, we shall triumph; our name shall remain in the book of life; it shall be confessed by Christ before his Father and his holy angels: we shall share with him in his triumph over all the rebellious nations, in that day, when we shall dash them in pieces like a potter's vessel: we shall for ever wear the lustre of the morning star; yea, we shall shine forth as the sun in the kingdom of our Father.

On the other hand, let us not indulge in a vain conceit of our own wisdom, and riches, and sufficiency; but let us thankfully hearken to that kind invitation, which our Lord gives the Laodiceans, to come and purchase that of him, without money, and without price, by which we may be truly and substantially enriched; that by which we may attain to real knowledge and true discernment; and may be clothed with ornaments and glories, which shall render us amiable in the eyes of God. How long has our compassionate Saviour been waiting upon us! How long has he stood knocking at the door! And O, for what guests hath he been excluded, who have filled our hearts and taken the throne in them, while the entrance has been denied to the Lord of glory and of grace! Let us humble ourselves in the dust before him, and entreat that he would now enter as into his own habitation; that he would do us the honour to sup with us; that he would cause us to sup with him; opening to us the stores of his love and bounty, and causing our souls to rejoice in his salvation. "Awaken us, O blessed Jesus, to give thee a most cheerful admittance; and rather shew thy love to us by chastisements and rebuke, than suffer us to forfeit it, by continued insensibility and negligence. Holy and true, who hast the key of David, exert thy power in opening our hearts: and O, set before us an open door of service; and give us to use it to the utmost, for thy glory. Strengthen us to keep the word of thy patience, and make us unshaken in our attachment to thee, in every hour of temptation, which may come upon the earth, that none may take away our crown."

Whatever our trials may be, let us rejoice in this, that they will be only for a short duration; for our Lord is coming quickly: whatever our combat may be, let us arm ourselves with faith in those glorious promises, which our Lord makes to them that persevere and overcome.

Have we not experienced the pleasure of filling a place in the house of God on earth? But this sacred satisfaction, and the holy season which affords it, are quickly over; let us long for the blessed time, when, if faithful, we shall be fixed as immoveable pillars in the temple of God above. And O, may we now continually wear engraven on our hearts, the name of our God, and of his heavenly city, and the new name of our triumphant Redeemer, as a token for good, that we shall bear the inscription in bright and everlasting characters above. But even this most expressive promise was not equal to all the purposes of a Saviour's love: that nothing, therefore, might be wanting to enkindle the most generous ambition, he has been pleased to speak of our sitting down with him upon his throne, as he is seated on his Father's throne, if we overcome. O, who would grudge to resign, not merely the accommodations of life, but even an earthly throne, in the hope of one so much more radiant, exalted, and permanent! Fear not, little flock of faithful saints! It is your Father's, and your Saviour's good pleasure to give you the kingdom; and he animates you to pursue it with such compassionate earnestness, as if he could hardly enjoy it himself, unless it were communicated to you.

REFLECTIONS.—1st, The fifth epistle is directed to the church in Sardis.

1. It comes from him that hath the seven spirits of God, who, as the divine Mediator, hath all the variety and fulness of the gifts and graces of the Spirit to bestow; and who hath the seven stars, guiding and directing his ministering servants, and giving them all their light and influence.

2. The contents are melancholy. [1.] I know thy works, that thou hast a name that thou livest, and art dead; amidst all thy specious appearances of religion, I know that thy professions in general are hypocritical, and many who have a name among the members of the church, are really dead in trespasses and sins, and others cold and lukewarm. Be watchful, and strengthen the things which remain, that are ready to die, before all vital godliness be utterly departed: for I have not found thy works perfect before God; they are but as the carcase, when the spirit is fled; thy duties lifeless; thy services insincere. Remember therefore how thou hast received and heard, and hold fast, and repent. Note; (1.) A form of godliness will avail nothing if the power of it be lost. (2.) They who feel their souls under decays, need to watch with holy jealousy, and cry to God for quickening influences to revive his work in their hearts. (3.) The way to recover from our backslidings, is to consider how we departed; what God's word has said of the sin and danger of such a conduct; to repent of our unfaithfulness; and still to cleave to those promises that preserve the soul from despair, and encourage us to return to God. [2.] He sharply threatens them: If therefore thou shalt not watch, but goest on careless and secure, I will come on thee as a thief, and thou shalt not know what hour I will come upon thee. Note; Christ's appearing at death or judgment will be very terrible and surprising to the backslider in heart; when too late he will be startled from the slumbers of security. [3.] He encourages the few faithful among them: Thou hast a few names even in Sardis, cold and careless as the generality of the professors are, which have not defiled their garments; who have kept themselves unspotted from the world, and maintained a becoming purity of doctrine and manners amidst abounding ungodliness; and they shall walk with me in white, as sacred priests and triumphant conquerors, decked with glory, honour, and immortality; for they are worthy, and meet for my inheritance among the saints in light.

3. The conclusion. He that overcometh, the same shall be clothed in white raiment; shining in splendid robes of righteousness and victory; and I will not blot out his name out of the book of life, but I will confess his name before my Father, and before his angels, in the great day of my appearing to judge the world. He that hath an ear, let him hear what the Spirit saith unto the churches. Note; They who fight manfully and faithfully under Christ's banner, will be acknowledged by him with most distinguished favour and honour, when he shall come to reward their fidelity.

2nd, The sixth epistle is directed to the angel of the church of Philadelphia. We have,

1. The preface. These things saith he that is holy, he that is true, who by nature is essential truth and holiness, the substance of all the prophecies and promises, the true Messiah; he that hath the key of David, on whose shoulders the government rests; he that openeth the gates of the grave and the kingdom of heaven to his faithful people, and no man shutteth; no creature can exclude such saints of God from his eternal glory; and shutteth up the wicked in the dreadful prison of eternal torment, and no man openeth, or can open the gates of the impassable gulph, to release the damned from thence.

2. The contents. [1.] I know thy works, and regard them with delight and approbation: behold, I have set before thee an open door. that my word should run, and have free access, and be glorified; and no man can shut it, I give thee a power and opportunity of spreading my gospel, which none of thy enemies can shut against thee; for thou hast a little strength, and a measure, though it be small, of grace and spiritual attainments; and hast kept my word with fidelity and steadfastness, and hast not denied my name, nor revolted from the profession of the faith amid the wiles of deceivers, and the persecutions of avowed enemies. Behold I will make them of the synagogue of Satan, (which say they are Jews, and are not, but do lie,) behold, with thankfulness and delight, I will make them, who, under pretence of zeal for Judaism, corrupt the doctrines of Christianity, and whose practice is as vicious as their principles are erroneous, to come and worship before thy feet; abased into the dust, and brought to take shame to themselves; and to know that I have loved thee, with distinguished favour and regard. Note; Sooner or later the bitterest persecutors of God's faithful people shall be made to know how dear they are to him, and be covered with everlasting confusion in the view of their malice against them. [2.] A gracious promise is given to the faithful. Because thou hast kept the word of my patience, and maintained the profession of the unadulterated gospel, amid the malignant opposition of envenomed foes, I also will keep thee from the hour of temptation, that thou shalt not apostatize from the truth under those fiery persecutions, which shall, under the bloody Heathen Emperors of Rome, come upon all the world, to try them that dwell upon the earth, and shew who are true and false professors. Note; (1.) They who steadily cleave to Christ, shall be kept in the most dangerous days. (2.) We must prepare for temptation; it will come, and if we are unprepared, we shall be in imminent danger. [3.] He adds a glorious encouragement. Behold, I come quickly; the time therefore of suffering cannot but be momentary; hold that fast which thou hast, with holy resolution, cleaving to the word of truth, that no man take thy crown; or, by fraud or violence, seduce or intimidate thee from the faith of the gospel, and rob thee of the reward of fidelity. Note; A sense of the speedy coming of Jesus for our help, is the greatest support under every affliction.

3. The conclusion. Him that overcometh, who is through my grace finally a conqueror, will I make a pillar in the temple of my God, and he shall go no more out; he shall be admitted into the eternal presence of God in glory, and there shall be ever with the Lord, enjoying that beatific vision. And I will write upon him the name of my God, to whose grace he is indebted for the conquest, and the name of the city of my God, which is new Jerusalem, which cometh down out of heaven from my God; even that new Jerusalem which shall soon be represented to thee, O John, in a most glorious vision: and I will write upon him my new name, acknowledging him for my faithful saint, and bringing him to share in all the glories of my kingdom. He that hath an ear, let him hear what the Spirit saith unto the churches; and well worthy is it of our deepest and most serious attention.

3rdly, The last epistle is directed to the angel of the church of Laodicea. We have,

1. The preface. These things saith the Amen, the faithful and true witness, whose testimony is infallible, who neither can nor will deceive his people, or fail of the accomplishment of his prophecies; the beginning of the creation of God; the author of life and being to every creature; the head of vital influences to his believing people, having in all things the pre-eminence, and possessing universal dominion in heaven and earth.

2. The contents. [1.] A melancholy account is given of their state. I know thy works, that thou art neither cold nor hot, but lifeless and lukewarm: I would thou wert cold or hot; either be sincerely zealous, or make no profession, rather than disgrace it by an unsuitable conduct. [2.] A threatening is added. So then because thou art lukewarm, and neither cold nor hot, I will spue thee out of my mouth, as loathsome and nauseous. [3.] The cause of their declension is remarked. Because thou sayest, I am rich, and increased with goods, and have need of nothing; endowed perhaps with spiritual gifts, abounding probably in worldly wealth, and thoroughly self-righteous and conceited; and thus they flattered themselves with high imaginations of their own excellence; and knowest not that thou art wretched, and miserable, and poor, and blind, and naked; insensible to thy spiritual wants and poverty; ignorant of all true wisdom; destitute of real grace and righteousness; and exposed to the storms of divine wrath. Note; (1.) Nothing is more fatal to the soul, than a vain conceit of our own excellencies. (2.) Many flatter themselves as confident of heaven, whose ways lead down to death and hell. [4.] He gives them the kindest advice. I counsel thee to buy of me, that is, to come to me to receive freely out of my fulness the supply of every want, gold tried in the fire, that thou mayest be rich; the gold of my spirit, wisdom, and grace, and all the spiritual measures which I bestow on my faithful followers; and white raiment that thou mayest be clothed, and that the shame of thy nakedness do not appear: apply to me for an interest in my infinite merit and sanctifying grace, that thou mayest be absolved before God, and adorned with every virtue and heavenly disposition which can render thee lovely in his sight: and anoint thine eyes with eye-salve, that thou mayest see the things which make for thy everlasting peace, and all the mysteries of gospel-grace, no longer blinded by ignorance, prejudice, and worldly lusts. Note; They who would be spiritually rich, and wise unto salvation, must come to Christ to buy out of his fullness; and, blessed be his name, the purchase is to be made without money and without price; for he freely gives to the miserable and the destitute. [5.] A gracious encouragement is given them to repent. As many as I love, I rebuke and chasten; the reproofs of my word, and the corrections of my providence, are the rod of love: be zealous therefore; cast off this lukewarm spirit; let the fire of zeal and love kindle in your hearts; and repent of your past unfaithfulness. Behold, such is my patience and condescension, I yet stand, waiting to be gracious, at the door of your hearts, and knock: if any man hear my voice, attend to my calls and warnings, and open the door in faith, to receive me with eager welcome into his soul, I will come in to him, and will sup with him, and he with me, honouring him with my presence, and love, and blessed communion. Note; Christ, by his providences, word and Spirit, knocks at the door of our hearts; and they who welcome him in, and cleave to him perseveringly, shall find him not only as a guest that tarrieth for a night, but whose communion shall make them blessed to all eternity.

3. The conclusion. To him that overcometh the corruptions of his nature, and the temptations of the world, will I grant to sit with me in my throne; even as I also overcame, and am sat down with my Father in his throne; to such infinite and transcendent glory and dignity shall he be exalted in the great day of my appearing, and shall come to reign with me triumphant over every foe for ever and ever. He that hath an ear, let him hear what the Spirit saith unto the churches; for these things are written for our learning to the latest ages; and blessed are they who attend to the warnings, reproofs, exhortations, encouragements, and instructions here revealed, and feel their mighty influence.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Revelation 3:21". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/revelation-3.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Here our Saviour concludes this epistle, as he did the former, with a promise to the persevering Christian, To him that overcometh, namely, all the trials and temptations of this life, and keeps his faith, love, and obedience, entire to the end, I will grant, not in a way of merit, but of free gift and grace, to sit down with me in my throne, namely, to partake of the same power, and glory, and kingdom, that I as Mediator do now partake of.

Where observe, Christ here distinguishes between his own throne and his Father's; the former seems to be his mediatorial,the latter his essential, throne; and he plainly tells us, that as he obtained his glory by overcoming Satan and the world, so must we; To him that overcometh will I grant-- even as I also overcame: the way to heaven for Christ and all his members is the same; as he conquered and finally overcame on earth before he was crowned in heaven, so must they.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Revelation 3:21". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/revelation-3.html. 1700-1703.

Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae

DISCOURSE: 2505

THE VICTOR’S REWARD

Revelation 3:21. To him that overcometh will I grant to sit with me in my throne, even as I also overcame, and am set down with my Father in his throne.

WE have seen at the close of every epistle a promise to him that overcometh. In truth, we all need encouragement in our warfare. It is the hope of profit or of honour that produces industry among all classes of the community: it prompts the philosopher to consume the midnight oil in study; the merchant to risk his property on the tempestuous ocean; and the soldier to brave the dangers and fatigues of war. The same principle may well be extended also to spiritual concerns, and animate the Christian in the pursuits of religion. His reward indeed is infinitely greater than any which this world can afford, and may therefore justly stimulate him to the most indefatigable exertions. The utmost that the labours of man can attain on earth, is, a royal title, and a temporal kingdom; but the Christian victor has a crown of glory laid up for him, and a participation of that very kingdom, which is possessed by Christ himself. The Judge of quick and dead pledges himself to bestow this reward on all his faithful followers. His words lead us to consider,

I. The Christian’s character—

Every Christian is by profession a soldier; he has enlisted under the banners of Christ; and fights till he has vanquished all the enemies of his soul—

The world is not able to detain him in bondage—

[As for the pleasures of the world, they have no charms for any person who knows the value of his own soul. It requires scarcely any more self-denial to renounce them, than for a philosopher to put away the toys of childhood. A regard for its honours is not so easily overcome. The Christian would gladly at first retain his reputation among his former acquaintance; and sometimes perhaps makes undue sacrifices rather than forfeit his good name: but when he finds how impossible it is to be faithful unto God without incurring the censure of the ungodly, he learns at last to bear “the reproach of Christ,” and to “rejoice that he is counted worthy to suffer shame for his sake.” The interests of the world still subject him to many and strong temptations, even after that he has both done and suffered much for Christ; but when he has weighed both the world and his own soul in the balance of the sanctuary, he determines to forego every interest rather than endanger his eternal salvation. Thus he evinces that “he is born of God by overcoming the world [Note: 1 John 4:4.].”]

The flesh also gradually loses its ascendency over him—

[Our inbred corruption is a more powerful enemy than the world, inasmuch as it is nearer to us, and ever with us. But the Christian maintains a conflict with it. He never is so perfect in this world but that he still carries about with him “a body of sin and death.” “The flesh lusts against the Spirit” to the latest hour of his life; but if any unhallowed appetite arise, he resists it to the uttermost, and will in no wise yield to its solicitations: or if it betray him into any unworthy conduct, he will mourn over it, and cry to God for grace and strength to resist it; and will never be at peace, till it is utterly mortified and subdued. A man’s besetting sin is that which will, for the most part, give him most trouble to the end of his days. Thus “through the Spirit he mortifies the deeds of the body,” and “crucifies the flesh with its affections and lusts [Note: Romans 8:13. Galatians 5:24.].” True, crucifixion is a lingering death: but still he has nailed his besetting sin to the cross: and it shall never regain its power, though it will still continue to pour forth its venom against Christ to the latest hour of our lives.]

Nor can the devil with all his hosts prevail against him—

[Satan is yet a greater adversary to the Christian than even flesh and blood [Note: Ephesians 6:12]; but the good soldier will not turn his back. He “girds on the whole armour of God,” and “goes forth in the strength of the Lord God.” Satan, like Pharaoh, (of whom he was the perfect archetype) casts every impediment in his way, and multiplies his thoughts of this world, to divert his attention from a better [Note: Exodus 5:6-9.]. When he cannot prevail to keep the Christian from the path of duty, he will endeavour, like that hardened monarch, to limit him in the prosecution of it [Note: Exodus 8:25; Exodus 8:28; Exodus 10:11; Exodus 10:24.]. When that fails, he will contrive, if possible, to lead him astray, and to fix his attention on controversy, or politics, or something of inferior concern. When that will not succeed, he will labour either to “puff him up with pride, and thus bring him into the condemnation of the devil;” or to cast him down with despondency, and thus cause him to desist from his purpose. But the Christian repels all his fiery darts, “resists him manfully till he makes him flee,” and finally “bruises him under his feet” as a vanquished enemy. This accords with the description given by St. John, “Young men, ye have overcome the wicked one [Note: 1 John 2:13.].”]

After having successfully maintained his conflicts, the Christian receives,

II. His reward—

As a view of the recompence that awaits us cannot fail of animating us in our warfare, it will be proper to contemplate it with care—

Our Lord declares it in terms the most glorious that can be conceived: “The Christian shall reign with him”—

[Christ is seated in heaven on a throne of glory: but he does not occupy that throne alone; he admits his victorious followers to a participation of it. Nothing less than this is deemed a sufficient reward for them. It were an unspeakably great reward, if we were only permitted to behold him upon his throne; but he assures us that we shall be exalted to sit thereon together with him, and thus to share both his honour and felicity. Such honour have all his saints; and he, as the arbiter of life and death, pledges his word, that he himself will bestow this reward upon them. How blessed then must they be! how poor a recompence would earthly kingdoms be in comparison of this!]

But the comparison which he here institutes, alone can put the promise in its true light—

[Christ was once conflicting with his enemies, just as we are; but he overcame them upon the cross, triumphed over them in his resurrection, and led them captive in his ascension; and is now set down at the right hand of the Majesty on high. Let us view him then on his Father’s throne, and we shall see what glory is reserved for us. Like him, we shall rest from our labours: never harassed either by sin or sorrow any more. We shall dwell in the immediate presence of him whom we love; no longer viewing him at a distance, by the eye of faith, through the medium of the word; but beholding him face to face, seeing him as we are seen, and “knowing him as we are known.” We shall moreover receive all the happiness of which our natures are capable. He who was once a man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief as his constant companion, now enjoys both in body and soul all the blessedness of the Godhead. In this we shall resemble him as far as any thing finite can resemble what is infinite. Our capacities of happiness will be enlarged beyond our highest conceptions, and every one will be as blessed as his capacity will admit of. Nor is Christ’s exaltation merely a pattern of ours. He is our forerunner; and the exaltation of the Head is a pledge and earnest that all the members shall in due time be glorified together with him.]

Application—

[If such be the felicity of all Christian soldiers, who will not enlist under the banners of Jesus? Who will not join himself to the Captain of our salvation, and give up his name to be enrolled among “the worthies of our David?” Let all of you, my brethren, flock to his standard, “like doves to their windows.” Gird on your spiritual armour, and go forth to the fight. You have a Commander who can not only lead you and direct you in the battle, but can shield your heads, and heal your wounds, and strengthen your arms, and ensure you the victory. Soldiers, “quit yourselves like men; be strong.” “Fight the good fight of faith,” and trust in him for a successful issue of your conflicts. It is but a little time that you shall have to engage; and though you go forth only with a sling and a stone, Goliath shall fall before you. Only go forth in dependence upon your God, and you have nothing to fear. But O what have you not to hope for? What blessed triumphs! What glorious spoils! What everlasting shouts of victory! Look at those who have gone before you in the combat; see them on their thrones, crowned with crowns of righteousness, and shouting with shouts of triumph. Soon, very soon, shall you be numbered amongst them. Let none of you then turn your backs. “If any man turn back,” says God, “my soul shall have no pleasure in him [Note: Hebrews 10:38.].” Fight on a little longer, and you shall not only be conquerors, but “more than conquerors.” The completest victories that an earthly hero can gain, will afford him matter for weeping as well as for joy. But your victories shall be unalloyed with sorrow, and crowned with everlasting gladness. “War then a good warfare,” and fight till you overcome. So shall you receive your promised recompence, and reign with your God for ever and ever.]

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Simeon, Charles. "Commentary on Revelation 3:21". Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/shh/revelation-3.html. 1832.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

To him that overcometh will I grant to sit with me in my throne; I will give him great honour, dignity, and power; he shall judge the world in the day of judgment, 1 Corinthians 6:3, the twelve, tribes of Israel, Matthew 19:28; he shall be made partaker of my glory, John 17:22,24.

Even as I also overcame, and am set down with my Father in his throne; but they must come to my throne as I came to it. I overcame the world, sin, death, the devil, and then ascended, and sat down with my Father in his throne: so they that will sit down with me in my throne of glory, must fight the same fight, and overcome, and then be crowned, sitting with me in my throne.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Revelation 3:21". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/revelation-3.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

Побеждающему Все истинные христиане (см. пояснение к 2:7).

сесть со Мною на престоле Моем Метафорическое выражение, означающее, что мы будем иметь те же привилегии и власть, которые доступны Христу, и будем царствовать с Ним (1:6; Мф. 19:28; Лк. 22:29, 30).

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Revelation 3:21". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/revelation-3.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

To sit with me; in a state of high and eternal exaltation and blessedness.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Revelation 3:21". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/revelation-3.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘He who overcomes, I will give to him the right to sit down on my throne, as I also overcame and sat down with my Father on his throne.’

The Laodiceans had much of this world’s goods but they were not royalty. He can offer them so much more than their so-called riches. Here those who overcome are offered not only royalty, but the royalty of the King of Kings, for they can share His throne and reign with Him.

He Himself shares the throne of God, something He alone can do because of Who He is, the true God. They cannot share that. But the one who overcomes will be privileged to shareHisthrone, the throne that was given to Him as the glorified God-man, and they can reign with Him for ever, a further guarantee of eternal life, and more!

So Jesus shares the throne of Godhead, for He is Lord of Lords, and He possesses the throne of glorified Man, for He is King of Kings (Revelation 19:16).

This guarantee to the overcomer may reflect Luke 22:29-30. ‘I appoint to you a kingdom, just as my Father appointed to me. That you may eat and drink at my table in my kingdom. And you will sit on thrones judging the twelve tribes of Israel’. And also may reflect Matthew 19:28, ‘in the regeneration, when the Son of Man shall sit on the throne of His glory, you also shall sit on twelve thrones judging the twelve tribes of Israel’. These promises, set in earthly terms, promised the disciples that their faithfulness would result in advancement beyond their wildest dreams. They would share with Him the Messianic Feast, and would be set as judges over the people who have rejected them and their Lord.

But in Matthew He then goes on to say thatallwho sacrifice earthly possessions and relationships for His sake will receive a hundredfold andinherit eternal life(Matthew 19:29). This demonstrates the connection of eternal life with the above ideas, showing that these promises will be fulfilled in Eternity.

Here in Revelation a similar promise is made to overcomers, for to share a throne is to participate in the authority of that throne. Thus they too will reign with Him. As we have already seen, the promises to overcomers are of sharing in the heavenly; the heavenly Paradise, the heavenly manna, and the heavenly Temple. So this throne and this reigning must also be seen as heavenly and not earthly. Just as when interpreting the Old Testament, we must take the spiritual meaning behind the promises and not press the literal words.

The final words of the chapter underline all that has been said.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Revelation 3:21". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/revelation-3.html. 2013.

Foy E. Wallace's Commentary on the Book of Revelation

5. "To him that overcometh will I grant to sit with me in my throne"--3:21.

Here is the constructive figure of a sitting court to which the faithful would be given admission to sit with Christ in his throne, to be associated with Christ in his spiritual rule. In chapter 2:26 this rule is said to be with "a rod of iron," which, as previously stated, means the invincible power of the truth, or gospel of Christ. In 1 Timothy 2:11-12, the apostle taught Timothy that this rule is in process now, and that reigning with Christ is concurrent with living with him.

This enthronization with Christ simply stated means that as Christians are governed by the rule of Christ, in this compliance with his teaching they become a part of his government. The immediate imagery of this passage therefore is, that the faithful victors over the persecutions, having exemplified obedience to his rule, are seated with Christ the Conqueror in his ruling throne. This picture is culminated in the throne scene of the martyrs Revelation 20:4, as shown in the commentary on the verses of that chapter.

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Wallace, Foy E. "Commentary on Revelation 3:21". "Foy E. Wallace's Commentary on the Book of Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/foy/revelation-3.html. 1966.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Revelation 3:21. He that overcometh, to him will I grant to sit down along with me in my throne, etc. This promise is the highest of all that we have met in the seven Epistles. The throne of Jesus is the throne of God,—‘I in them, and Thou in Me, that they may be perfected into one;’ ‘Father, that which Thou hast given Me, I will that, where I am, they also may be with Me’ (John 17:23-24). The promise is the ‘apotheosis of victory,’ and as such it has evidently a reference not only to the church at Laodicea, but to the whole series of the seven churches, and of the promises addressed to them.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Revelation 3:21". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/revelation-3.html. 1879-90.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

am set down = sat down. See Acts 2:33, Acts 2:34. Ephesians 1:20, Ephesians 1:21. Hebrews 1:8; Hebrews 8:1. The Lord now stands (Rev 1), and is about to come down in judgment.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Revelation 3:21". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/revelation-3.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

To him that overcometh will I grant to sit with me in my throne, even as I also overcame, and am set down with my Father in his throne.

Sit with me in my throne - (Matthew 19:28; Matthew 20:23; John 17:22; John 17:24; 2 Timothy 2:12; Revelation 2:26-27; Revelation 20:6.) He whom Christ just before threatened to spue out of His mouth, is now offered a seat with Him on His throne! 'The highest place is within reach of the lowest: the faintest spark of grace may be fanned into the mightiest flame' (Trench).

Even as I also. Two thrones are mentioned:

(1) His Father's, upon which He has sat since His ascension, after victory over death, sin, the world: upon this none can sit except God, and the God-man Christ Jesus, for it is the incommunicable prerogative of God;

(2) the throne peculiarly His as the once humbled and then glorified Son of man, to be set up over the whole earth (heretofore usurped by Satan) at His coming again: in this the victorious saints shall share

(1 Corinthians 6:2).

The transfigured elect shall with Christ judge and reign over the nations in the flesh, and Israel foremost of them: ministering blessings to them, as angels were the Lord's mediators of blessing and administrators of government in setting up His throne in Israel at Sinai. This privilege belongs exclusively to the present time while Satan reigns, when alone there is scope for conflict and victory (2 Timothy 2:11-12). When Satan shall be bound (Revelation 20:4) there shall be no longer scope, for all on earth shall know the Lord, from the least to the greatest. This, the crowning promise, at the end of all the seven addresses, gathers all in one. It forms the link to the next part, where the Lamb is seated on His Father's throne (Revelation 4:2-3; Revelation 5:5-6). The Eastern throne is broader than ours, admitting others besides the chief in the center. Trench, The order of the promises corresponds to the unfolding of the kingdom of God from its first beginnings on earth to its consummation in heaven. To the faithful at Ephesus:

(1) the tree of life in the paradise of God (Revelation 2:7) answering to Genesis 2:1-25 (1) the tree of life in the paradise of God (Revelation 2:7), answering to Genesis 2:1-25.

(2) Sin entered the world, and death by sin: to the faithful at Smyrna it is promised they shall not be hurt by the second death (Revelation 2:11). The promise of the hidden manna (Revelation 2:17) to Pergamos

(3) answers to the Mosaic period, the Church in the wilderness.

(4) That to Thyatira, triumph over the nations (Revelation 2:26-27), consummates the kingdom, answering to the prophetic type, David and Solomon's power over the nations. The seven fall into two groups, four and three, as the Lord's prayer, three and four. The last three pass from earth to heaven; the Church contemplated as triumphant, with its steps from glory to glory.

(5) Christ promises to the believer of Sardis not to blot his name out of the book of life, but to confess him before His Father and the angels at the judgment day, and clothe him with a glorified body of dazzling whiteness (Revelation 3:4-5). To believers at Philadelphia,

(6) that they shall be citizens, fixed as immoveable pillars in the new Jerusalem, where city and temple are one (Revelation 3:12). Here not only individual salvation is promised, as in Sardis, but also privileges in the blessed communion of the Church triumphant.

(7) Lastly, to the faithful of Laodicea is given the crowning promise, a seat with Christ on His throne, even as He sits with His Father on His Father's throne (Revelation 3:21).

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 3:21". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/revelation-3.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(21) To him that overcometh ... .—He will share Christ’s throne as Christ shared His Father’s throne. Here are two thrones mentioned. My throne, saith Christ: this is the condition of glorified saints who sit with Christ in His throne. “But My Father’s (i.e., God’s) throne is the power of divine majesty.” Herein none may sit but God, and the God-man Jesus Christ. The promise of sharing the throne is the climax of an ascending series of glorious promises, which carry the thought from the Garden of Eden (Revelation 2:7) through the wilderness (Revelation 2:17), the temple (Revelation 3:12), to the throne. The promise bears marked resemblance to the language of St. Paul to the Ephesians (Ephesians 2:6). This crowning promise is made to the most unpleasing of the churches. But it is well that thus the despondency which often succeeds the sudden collapse of self-satisfied imaginations should be met by so bright a prospect. Though their religion has been proved an empty thing, there is a hope which may well drive away despair. “The highest place is within the reach of the lowest; the faintest spark of grace may be fanned into the mightiest flame of divine love.”

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Revelation 3:21". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/revelation-3.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

To him that overcometh will I grant to sit with me in my throne, even as I also overcame, and am set down with my Father in his throne.
him
2:7; 12:11; 1 John 5:4,5
to sit
1:6; 2:26,27; Matthew 19:28; Luke 22:30; 1 Corinthians 6:2,3; 2 Timothy 2:12
even
John 16:33
and am
5:6-8; 7:17; Daniel 7:13,14; Matthew 28:18; John 5:22,23; Ephesians 1:20-23; Philippians 2:9-21
Reciprocal: 1 Samuel 2:8 - set them;  1 Samuel 17:25 - the king;  1 Kings 2:7 - eat;  Esther 5:1 - sat;  Psalm 16:6 - I have;  Psalm 18:29 - by thee;  Psalm 45:15 - they shall;  Psalm 91:15 - honour;  Psalm 98:1 - his right;  Psalm 101:6 - that they;  Psalm 149:9 - this honour;  Proverbs 4:9 - a crown;  Proverbs 16:32 - and he;  Isaiah 6:1 - sitting;  Isaiah 22:23 - a glorious;  Jeremiah 17:12 - GeneralEzekiel 1:26 - the appearance of a man;  Daniel 7:18 - the saints;  Daniel 7:22 - judgment;  Hosea 11:12 - ruleth;  Zechariah 3:7 - judge;  Zechariah 6:13 - bear;  Matthew 8:11 - shall sit;  Matthew 10:22 - but;  Matthew 24:47 - That;  Matthew 25:21 - I will;  Matthew 25:31 - then;  Mark 16:19 - he was;  Luke 9:48 - he that;  Luke 12:37 - that;  Luke 18:30 - manifold more;  Luke 22:69 - on;  John 13:32 - shall;  John 14:2 - my;  John 14:3 - I will;  John 14:23 - make;  John 17:24 - I will;  Acts 7:49 - Heaven;  Romans 5:2 - the glory;  Romans 5:17 - shall reign;  Romans 8:17 - heirs of;  Galatians 6:9 - if;  Ephesians 2:6 - sit;  Ephesians 3:18 - able;  Philippians 3:14 - press;  2 Thessalonians 2:14 - to;  1 Timothy 4:8 - having;  Hebrews 1:3 - sat;  Hebrews 8:1 - who;  James 1:12 - the crown;  2 Peter 1:11 - an entrance;  Revelation 4:2 - and one;  Revelation 11:12 - And they;  Revelation 22:1 - proceeding;  Revelation 22:5 - and they;  Revelation 22:19 - and from

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Revelation 3:21". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/revelation-3.html.

Light & Truth: Bible Thoughts and Themes on Revelation

The Victory And The Crown.

Revelation 3:21.

Three persons are set before us here—the warrior, the conqueror, the king. Or, putting the figure in another way, we have—1. The battle; 2. The victory; 3. The reward.

I. The BATTLE.Common life in this world is a warfare; and hence even worldly men speak and write of "the battle of life!" Much more is the Christian"s life a warfare. It is an out and out warfare—for all here is hostile. It is called the good fight, the fight of faith, the good warfare.

(1.) It is INNER warfare.The 7th of the Romans is the description of this—the battle between faith and unbelief, between the spirit and the flesh. This war is private, solitary—with no eye upon the warrior; fought in the closet, on the knees, with the Bible as his weapon; not uncertainly, nor as one that beats the air.

(2.) It is OUTER warfare.The enemies are legion; the world, with all its enmities, snares, pomps, pleasures; Satan, with his principalities and powers—both of these in combination hating, persecuting, attacking. This is "the great fight of afflictions" (Hebrews 10:32). Thus it is so far public—before men; "we are made a spectacle to the world, and to angels, and to men."

(3.) It is DAILY warfare.It is not one great battle, but a multitude of battles—constant warring—there is no intermission and no discharge in this war. The enemy wearies not, ceases not—nor must we. We wake to warfare each morning, and go out to warfare each day. Everywhere we find the enemy posted, sometimes openly, sometimes in ambush. The conflict is life-long, and it is daily.

(4.) It is warfare not fought with human weapons.The weapons of our warfare are not carnal. We do not war after the flesh. It is in divine strength; with the sword of the Spirit; clothed in the whole armor of God. It begins when we begin when we believe. Faith, instead of being the end, is the beginning of conflict; ours is "the good (or "glorious") fight of faith."

(5). It is warfare in which we are sharers with Christ.He first fought the good fight, as the Captain of our salvation—the Lord strong and mighty—the Lord mighty in battle. The inner warfare indeed was not His, but all the rest was. He fought, when here, the same battles as we; and it is into His warfare that we are called to enter. His battle on earth was ours; and our battle now on earth is His. Let us fight it with this remembrance and encouragement. We fight along with Paul, but we also fight along with Christ.

II. The VICTORY.Here it is spoken of as one great final victory, but in reality it is a multitude. As are the battles, so are the victories. There may be occasional defeats—wounds—losing ground; but the tide of victory rolls steadily onward. Inner and outer warfare ends in victory—we are made more than conquerors through Him who loved us. He fought and overcame, and He leads us on to victory—"Be of good cheer, I have overcome the world." The brunt of the battle fell on Him—He routed the army, and it is with a "conquered foe" that we have to do. Sin, hell, death, the world, the devil, He has vanquished, and He is now leading us on to the same victory.

Seven times in these chapters do we hear the glorious words, "To him who overcomes." Each Church had its battle and its victory—even Laodicea—so has each individual. No one can fight another"s battle—or win another"s victory. Each fights and wins for himself. Fight then, and win; overcome daily; nor faint until the long series of victories is summed up in the one great final triumph—the triumph of each saint, and of the whole Church of God.

III. The REWARD.In these epistles seven rewards are promised—a peculiar reward to each. To Ephesus, the tree of life; to Smyrna, deliverance from the second death; to Pergamos, the hidden manna and the white stone; to Thyatira, dominion and the morning-star; to Sardis, the white clothing; to Philadelphia, to be a pillar and to receive the new name; to Laodicea, a seat on Christ"s throne—each according to his peculiar battle and victory. In Laodicea there are warriors and conquerors—few, perhaps, but still some whose faith remained steadfast, raising them out of lukewarmness and worldliness. To these there is a brilliant hope presented—a seat upon Christ"s throne. In Laodicean times, and a Laodicean Church, be faithful and true!

(1.) A throne.Not salvation merely, or life, but higher than these—glory, honor, dominion and power. From being the lowest here, they are made the highest hereafter. Even out of Laodicea there come God"s kings and priests—heirs of the throne!

(2.) Christ"s throne.He has a seat on the Father"s throne as the reward of His victory; we have a seat on His as the reward of our overcoming. He shares with us His crown and throne. We are made "joint-heirs" with Him. He is on the Father"s throne just now; He will shortly be upon His own. To a seat with Him we look forward; and, cheered by this hope, we fight the good fight of faith. We are sharers or "partakers with Christ" in all things. We share His battles, His victories, His rewards—His cross, and His crown.

Let us look forward then, as well as backward. All the promises to these Churches bid us look forward. Amid toil, conflict, weariness, sorrow, backsliding, we have a hope! Let us hold it fast; let us use it constantly. In the midst of Laodicean lukewarmness here is something to stimulate and rouse! When our hands hang down, let us think upon the throne—the throne and Him who gives it—the throne and Him who sits on it, and shares it with us. It will be glorious enough to compensate for hardship and conflict now! It may soon be here—we know not how soon. Events are rushing on—Antichrist is waxing strong; Israel is preparing to return; wars are rising; departures from the faith are multiplying; the gospel is going forth as a witness. The King is on His way. Behold, the Bridegroom comes! Let us watch and be ready.

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Bonar, Horatius. "Commentary on Revelation 3:21". "Light & Truth: Bible Thoughts and Themes on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bch/revelation-3.html.

Walter Scott's Commentary on Revelation

PROMISE TO THE OVERCOMER.

Revelation 3:21. — "He that overcomes, to him will I give to sit with Me in My throne: as I also have overcome, and have sat down with My Father in His throne." The "throne" is the sign and symbol of royal authority and dominion. How did Jesus reach His Father's throne and sit down with Him in that exalted seat? Not by inherent right only! But by His life of patience and death for His Father's glory. The conqueror's path lies open to us. His example is our cheer. His footprints our guide-marks. The reward to the overcomer is undoubtedly a glorious one, but by no means exceeding those addressed to the Philadelphian conquerors. Association with Christ as Son of Man in His kingdom is here the promised blessing. The kingdom will be universal in extent (Psalms 72:8; Zechariah 14:9; Psalms 8:1-9); righteous in administration (Psalms 72:1-7; Psalms 45:7; Isaiah 32:1); and everlasting in duration (Daniel 7:27; 2 Peter 1:11; Daniel 4:34). Jerusalem on high will be the capital seat of the heavenly department of the kingdom (Revelation 21:1-27). Jerusalem on earth forms the metropolitan city of the kingdom here (Jeremiah 3:17). The Laodicean conqueror is promised association with Christ in His kingdom and glory. Surely a rich and full reward for the brief if rough struggle in overcoming the Laodicean element environing us on every hand. But the contest must be maintained to the end.

Then follows the usual call to hear, which fitly brings these Church addresses to a close.

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Scott, Walter. "Commentary on Revelation 3:21". "Walter Scott's Commentary on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sor/revelation-3.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

Him that overcometh means one who is faithful under all trails and difficulties. Sit with me in my throne is another figurative expression, meaning that such a person will be regarded as having right to that fellowship with Christ in the kingdom, that is stated in 1 Corinthians 4:8 and 1 Peter 2:9.

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Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on Revelation 3:21". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/revelation-3.html. 1952.

Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation

Revelation 3:21

Revelation 3:21 To him that overcometh will I grant to sit with me in my throne, even as I also overcame, and am set down with my Father in his throne.

To him that overcometh will I grant to sit with me in my throne.

To be with Christ in His throne, doth signify, First, That they are made kings, and shall reign on earth, Revelation 5:9-10. There are two sorts of thrones, where Christ and all His saints shall sit, and reign together. One throne is on earth; for Christ shall be king of all the earth, Zechariah 14:9. The kingdom and dominion under the whole heaven shall be given to the saints of the most high, Daniel 7:27. Both these prophecies, and that also Revelation 11:15 will shortly be fulfilled; even in the days of those kings. Daniel 2:44-45. Suddenly after the resurrection (or restoring) of Christ's two slain witnesses, that Isaiah, His Churches and His ministers, Revelation 11:11-15 which will be in three prophetical days and in half, Numbers 4:34 and Ezekiel 4:5-6 whereof more fully in the Exposition of the Eleventh chapter of this Revelation. See KNOLLYS: Revelation 11:1[ff] The other throne is in Heaven; where Christ and His saints shall reign to eternity, Matthew 25:24 and shall judge the world of the wicked; and the fallen angels, 1 Corinthians 6:2-3 called the eternal judgment, Hebrews 6:1-5.

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Knollys, Hanserd. "Commentary on Revelation 3:21". "Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hkc/revelation-3.html.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

21.To him that overcometh—The last and most glorious promise to the victor.

With me in my throne—The throne being extended like a sofa, and competent to contain many sitters.

Overcame—For us, we conquering in his victory, reigning with his sceptre, and sitting upon his throne. For, while we form a vivid image of this co-session of the saints with Christ, we are to understand it only as an image of the truth that through Christ’s merits and mercy the saints are to be raised to a glory under his headship, of which priesthood, white garments, kingdom, sceptres, and thrones are the symbols, not the exact literality.

Father’ throne—Note on Revelation 21:1.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Revelation 3:21". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/revelation-3.html. 1874-1909.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Revelation 3:21. . . ., To share Christ’s royal power and judicial dignity it a reward proffered in the gospels, but Jesus there (cf.Mark 10:40) disclaimed this prerogative. God’s throne is Christ’s, as in Revelation 22:1. = the moral purity and sensitiveness (cf.Revelation 3:18 and on Revelation 2:7) which succeeds in responding to the divine appeal. The schema of God, Christ, and the individual Christian (cf. on Revelation 2:27) is characteristically Johannine (f.John 15:9 f., John 17:19 f., John 20:21), though here as in Revelation 3:20 (contrast John 14:23) the eschatological emphasis makes the parallel one of diction rather than of thought.

The scope and warmth of the promises to Laodicea seem rather out of place in view of the church’s poor religion, but here as elsewhere the prophet is writing as much for the churches in general as for the particular community. He speaks . This consideration, together with the close sequence of thought in Revelation 3:19-21 forbids any attempt to delete Revelation 3:20-21 as a later editorial addition (Wellhausen) or to regard Revelation 3:20 (Revelation 3:21) as an epilogue to the seven letters (Vitringa, Alford, Ramsay) rather than as an integral part of the Laodicean epistle. Such a detachment would be a gratuitous breach of symmetry. But, while these closing sentences are not a sort of climax which gathers up the menaces of 2–3., Revelation 3:21 (with its throne-reference) anticipates the following visions (Revelation 3:4-5.). To the prophet the real value and significance of Christ’s life were focussed in his sacrificial death and in the rights and privileges which he secured thereby for those on whose behalf he had suffered and triumphed. This idea, already suggested in Revelation 1:5-6; Revelation 1:17-18, forms the central theme of the next oracle.

The now pass out of sight till the visions are over. During the latter it is the who are usually in evidence, until the collective term is employed in the final vision (cf.Revelation 3:12). John knows nothing of any catholic . To him the are so many local communities who share a common faith and expect a common destiny; they are, as Kattenbusch observes, colonies of heaven, and heaven is their mother-country. Partly owing to O.T. associations, partly perhaps on account of the feeling that an (in the popular Greek sense of the term) implied a city, John eschews this term. He also ignores the authority of any officials; the religious situation depends upon the prophets, who are in direct touch with God and through whom the Spirit of God controls and guides the saints. Their words are God’s words; they can speak and write with an authority which enables them to say, Thus saith the Spirit. Only, while in the contemporary literature of Christianity the prophetic outlook embraces either the need of organisation in order to meet the case of churches which are scattered over a wide area and exposed to the vagaries of unauthorised leaders (Pastoral Epistles and Ignatius), or contention among the office-bearers themselves (a sure sign of the end, Asc. Isa. iii. 20f.), John’s apocalypse stands severely apart from either interest.

NOTE on Revelation 1:9 to Revelation 3:22. We have no data to show whether the seven letters or addresses ever existed in separate form, or whether they were written before or after the rest of the visions. All evidence for such hypotheses consists of quasi-reasons or precarious hypotheses based on some a priori theory of the book’s composition. The great probability is that they never had any rôle of their own apart from this book, but were written for their present position. As the Roman emperors addressed letters to the Asiatic cities or corporations (the inscriptions mention at least six to Ephesus, seven to Pergamos, three to Smyrna, etc.), so Jesus, the true Lord of the Asiatic churches, is represented as sending communications to them (cf. Deissmann’s Licht vom Osten, pp. 274 f.). The dicit or with which the Imperial messages open corresponds to the more biblical of Revelation 2:1, etc. Each of the apocalyptic communications follows a fairly general scheme, although in the latter four the appeal for attention follows (instead of preceding) the mystic promise, while the imperative repent occurs only in the first, third, fifth, and seventh, the other churches receiving praise rather than censure. This artificial or symmetrical arrangement, which may be traced in or read into other details, is as characteristic of the whole apocalypse as is the style which—when the difference of topic is taken into account—cannot be said to exhibit peculiarities of diction, syntax, or vocabulary sufficient to justify the relegation of the seven letters to a separate source. Even if written by another hand or originally composed as a separate piece, they must have been worked over so thoroughly by the final editor and fitted so aptly into the general scheme of the whole Apocalypse (cf. e.g.Revelation 2:7 = Revelation 22:2; Revelation 22:14; Revelation 22:19; Revelation 2:11 = Revelation 20:6; Revelation 2:17 = Revelation 19:12; Revelation 2:26 = Revelation 20:4; Revelation 2:28 = Revelation 22:16; Revelation 3:5 = Revelation 7:9; Revelation 7:13; Revelation 3:5 = Revelation 13:8, Revelation 20:15; Revelation 3:12 = Revelation 21:10, Revelation 22:14; Revelation 3:21 = Revelation 4:4; Revelation 3:20 = Revelation 19:9; etc.), that it is no longer possible to disentangle them (or their nucleus). The special traits in the conception of Christ are mainly due to the fact that the writer is dealing here almost exclusively with the inner relation of Jesus to the churches. They are seldom, if ever, more realistic or closer to the messianic categories of the age than is elsewhere the case throughout the apocalypse; and if the marjoram of Judaism or (as we might more correctly say) of human nature is not wholly transmuted into the honey of Christian charity—which is scarcely surprising under the circumstances—yet the moral and mental stature of the writer appears when he is set beside so powerful a counsellor in some respects as the later Ignatius. Here John is at his full height. He combines moral discipline and moral enthusiasm in his injunctions. He sees the central things and urges them upon the churches, with a singular power of tenderness and sarcasm, insight and foresight, vehemence and reproach, undaunted faithfulness in rebuke and a generous readiness to mark what he thinks are the merits as well as the failings and perils of the communities. The needs of the latter appear to have been twofold. One, of which they were fully conscious, was outward. The other, to which they were not entirely alive, was inward. The former is met by an assurance that the stress of persecution in the present and in the immediate future was under God’s control, unavoidable and yet endurable. The latter is met by the answer of discipline and careful correction; the demand for purity and loyalty in view of secret errors and vices is reiterated with a keen sagacity. In every case, the motives of fear, shame, noblesse oblige, and the like, are crowned by an appeal to spiritual ambition and longing, the closing note of each epistle thus striking the keynote of what follows throughout the whole Apocalypse. In form, as well as in content, the seven letters are the most definitely Christian part of the book.

The scene now changes. Christ in authority over his churches, and the churches with their angels, pass away; a fresh and ampler tableau of the vision opens (cf. on Revelation 1:19), ushering in the future (Revelation 6:1 to Revelation 22:5), which—as disclosed by God through Christ (Revelation 1:1)—is prefaced by a solemn exhibition of God’s supremacy and Christ’s indispensable position in revelation. In Apoc. Bar. xxiv. 2 the seer is told that on the day of judgment he and his companions are to see “the long-suffering of the Most High which has been throughout all generations, who has been long-suffering towards all those born that sin and are righteous.” He then seeks an answer to the question, “But what will happen to our enemies I know not, and when Thou wilt visit Thy works (i.e., for judgment)”? This is precisely the course of thought (first inner mercies and then outward judgments) in Revelation 2-3, 4 f.; although in the former John sees in this life already God’s great patience towards his people, The prophet is now admitted to the heavenly conclave where (by an adaptation of the rabbinic notion) God reveals, or at least prepares, his purposes before executing them. Chapter 4 and chapter 5 are counterparts; in the former God the Creator, with his praise from heavenly beings, is the central figure: in the latter the interest is focussed upon Christ the redeemer, with his praise from the human and natural creation as well. Chapter 5 further leads over into the first series of events (the seven seals, 6–8) which herald the dénouement. Henceforth Jesus is represented as the Lamb, acting but never speaking, until in the epilogue (Revelation 22:6-21) the author reverts to the Christological standpoint of 1–3. Neither this nor any other feature, however, is sufficient to prove that 4–5 represent a Jewish source edited by a Christian; the whole piece is Christian and homogeneous (Sabatier, Schön, Bousset, Pfleiderer, Wellhausen). Chapter 4 is a preliminary description of the heavenly court: God’s ruddy throne with a green nimbus being surrounded by a senate of and mysterious . Seven torches burn before the throne, beside a crystal ocean, while from it issue flashes and peals accompanied by a ceaseless liturgy of adoration from the and the , who worship with a rhythmic emotion of awe.

 

 

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Bibliographical Information
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Revelation 3:21". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/revelation-3.html. 1897-1910.

The Bible Study New Testament

21. To those who win the victory. The promise is available! Sit by me. Share his rule (compare 1 Corinthians 6:2-3). Just as I have been victorious. He has already defeated Satan (Hebrews 12:2).

 

 

 

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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Revelation 3:21". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/revelation-3.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.