corner graphic   Hi,    
ver. 2.0.19.04.18
Finding the new version too difficult to understand? Go to classic.studylight.org/

Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Romans 11:13

But I am speaking to you who are Gentiles. Inasmuch then as I am an apostle of Gentiles, I magnify my ministry,

Adam Clarke Commentary

This and the following verse should be read in a parenthesis. St. Paul, as the apostle of the Gentiles, wished to show them the high pitch of glory and blessedness to which they had been called, that they might have a due sense of God's mercy in calling them to such a state of salvation; and that they might be jealous over themselves, lest they should fall as the Jews had done before them: and he dwells particularly on the greatness of those privileges which the Gentiles had now received, that he might stir up the minds of his countrymen to emulation, and might be the means of saving some of them, as he states in the following verse.

I magnify mine office - This is a very improper translation of την διακονιαν μου δοξαζω, which is, literally, I honor this my ministry. Dr. Taylor has justly observed that magnify, except when applied to the most High, carries with it, in our language, the idea of stretching beyond the bounds of truth; whereas the apostle simply means that he does justice to his ministry, by stating the glorious things which he was commissioned to preach among the Gentiles: blessings which the Jews by their obstinacy had forfeited.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Romans 11:13". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/romans-11.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

For I speak to you Gentiles - What I am saying respecting the Jews, I say with reference to you who are Gentiles, to show you in what manner you have been admitted to the privileges of the people of God; to excite your gratitude; to warn you against abusing those mercies. etc. As Paul also was appointed to preach to them, he had a right to speak to them with authority.

I am the apostle of the Gentiles - The apostle of the Gentiles, not because other apostles did not preach to Gentiles, for they all did, except perhaps James; nor because Paul did not himself preach occasionally among the Jews; but because he was especially called to carry the gospel to the Gentiles, and that this was his original commission Acts 9:15; because he was principally employed in collecting and organizing churches in pagan lands; and because the charge of the Gentile churches was especially intrusted to him, while that of the Jewish churches was especially intrusted to Peter; see Galatians 1:16; Ephesians 3:8; Galatians 2:7-8. As Paul was especially appointed to this function, he claimed special authority to address those who were gathered into the Christian church from pagan lands.

I magnify mine office - I honor δοξάζω doxazōmy ministry. I esteem it of great importance; and by thus showing that the gospel is to be preached to the Gentiles, that the barrier between them and the Jews is to be broken down, that the gospel may be preached to all people, I show that the office which proclaims this is one of signal honor. A minister may not magnify himself, but he may magnify his office. He may esteem himself as less than the least of all saints, and unworthy to be called a servant of God Ephesians 3:8, yet he may feel that he is an ambassador of Christ, intrusted with a message of salvation, entitled to the respect due to an ambassador, and to the honor which is appropriate to a messenger of God To unite these two things constitutes the dignity of the Christian ministry.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Romans 11:13". "Barnes' Notes on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/romans-11.html. 1870.

Haldane's Exposition on the Epistle to the Romans

ForI speak to you Gentiles, inasmuch as I am the Apostle of the gentiles, I magnify mine office:

The Apostle continues, to the beginning of the 16th verse, to amplify still further what he had just announced, in proof that the salvation of the Gentiles is closely connected with God’s dealings towards the Jews. The Gentiles were largely blessed with the Gospel when it was rejected by the Jews; but they will be blessed with it to an unspeakably greater extent when the Jews shall be recalled. Paul was the Apostle of the Gentiles, and by uttering this prediction with regard to the Gentiles, at the period of the restoration of the Jews, he says he magnifies his office. He here addresses himself particularly to those in the church at Rome, who were of the Gentiles. For as he had been appointed their Apostle, he was desirous to commend his ministry among them, to assert the honor of his commission, and to prove its great importance in imparting to them the knowledge of the Gospel. He shows, with regard to the Gentiles, that its value was enhanced in proportion as a greater number of Gentiles will be saved. In this view, it is greatly for the interest of the Gentiles that the Jews should be brought back, and this should increase their efforts for their conversion.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Haldane, Robert. "Commentary on Romans 11:13". "Haldane's Exposition on the Epistle to the Romans and Hebrews". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hal/romans-11.html. 1835.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

But I speak to you that are Gentiles. Inasmuch then as I am an apostle of Gentiles, I glorify my ministry; If by any means I may provoke to jealousy them that are my flesh, and may save some of them.

What a brickbat this verse is to the air castles sometimes built on the preceding verse! Instead of Paul's thought having to do with some vast ingathering of fleshly Israel at some future time, it is concerned with the near impossibility of saving any of them at all. As Barrett noted,

Paul's hope here seems surprisingly limited ... "and so save some of them" ... Out of the provocation of Israel as a whole ("my flesh and blood"), there may come a few conversions.[17]

This verse certainly does not envision any wholesale conversion of Jews in Paul's day or at any other time.

Provoke to jealousy ... should still be viewed not as productive of emulation but as producing enraged opposition. Even that, Paul was prepared to endure in the hope of saving a few of them. This ascription of the meaning of "jealousy" derives from the connotation of "provocation" here associated with it, and also from the fact of its being produced, not in Paul's brethren, else he would have used that word, but in his "flesh," which is a plain reference to the fleshly Israel. Whether or not it was Paul's intention to arouse bitter opposition, that was surely what resulted from the jealousy of the fleshly Israel. Another reason for this understanding of "jealousy" is that it hardly seems a proper motive for becoming a child of God.

I am an apostle of Gentiles ... Lard suggested this meaning of these words:

As I am your apostle, I make bold to tell you (Gentiles) that both the fall and loss of Israel have proved blessings to you. Whatever they are to Israel, to you they are gain.[18]

Perhaps Lard's thought should be expanded to include the mention of "fullness" thus: "And if even their loss is your gain, think what the conversion of a few of them can mean; and, with that in view, I am ready to provoke all of them in the hopes of saving some."

[17] C. K. Barrett, op. cit., p. 215.

[18] Moses E. Lard, op. cit., p. 359.


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Romans 11:13". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/romans-11.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

For I speak to you Gentiles,.... The church at Rome, as the primitive churches for the most part did, consisted of Jews and Gentiles; hence the apostle sometimes addresses the one, as in Romans 2:17, and sometimes the other, as here; and this he does to observe unto them the grace and goodness of God, in enriching them with the Gospel of salvation; and that they might not despise the Jews, from whom it first came out, and through whose fall it came to them, and was preached among them by some of that nation:

in as much as I am the apostle of the Gentiles. He was ordained and set apart by God, in his eternal purposes, to be a teacher of the Gentiles; he was sent immediately by Christ to bear his name among them, though not among them only, to the exclusion of the people of Israel; he chiefly preached the Gospel to them, though sometimes to the Jews also; and the success of his ministry was mostly among the uncircumcision, though he sought by all ways and means to gain both Jews and Gentiles: hence he addresses the Gentiles with greater freedom and boldness, because he was their apostle, and had been so useful among them; and is a reason why we Gentiles should have a special regard to his writings; for though every word of God is pure, and all Scripture is divinely inspired, and is profitable on one account or other; nor is any part of it to be slighted and neglected; yet as Paul's epistles are written chiefly to the Gentile churches, excepting that to the Hebrews, and which some question whether it is his, they ought especially to be attended to by us; though, alas, of all the inspired writings they are had in the least esteem:

I magnify mine office: not himself, for he was not of a self-exalting spirit, but humble and lowly minded, ready at all times to own himself to be less than the least of saints and the chief of sinners; but his office, which he had received from Christ, as an instance of his grace and favour. This was magnified partly by the miracles, signs, and wonders done by him, in proof, and for the confirmation of his apostleship; and partly by his constant, diligent, and faithful preaching of the Gospel: as also by the unwearied pains he took to spread it far and near; and likewise by the numbers of souls he was the means of bringing to the knowledge of Christ; and it was no small accession of glory to his office, as an apostle of the Gentiles, that he was an instrument of the conversion of many among the Jews.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Romans 11:13". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/romans-11.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

8 For I speak to you Gentiles, inasmuch as I am the apostle of the Gentiles, m I magnify mine office:

(8) He witnesses by his own example, that he goes before all others in this regard.

(m) I make noble and famous.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Romans 11:13". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/romans-11.html. 1599-1645.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

To you that are Gentiles (υμιν τοις ετνεσινhumin tois ethnesin). “To you the Gentiles.” He has a serious word to say to them.

Inasmuch then (επ οσον μεν ουνEphesians' hoson men oun). Not temporal, quamdiu, “so long as” (Matthew 9:15), but qualitative quatenus “in so far then as” (Matthew 25:40).

I glorify my ministry (την διακονιαν μου δοχαζωtēn diakonian mou doxazō). As apostle to the Gentiles (ετνων αποστολοςethnōn apostolos objective genitive). Would that every minister of Christ glorified his ministry.


Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Romans 11:13". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/romans-11.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

For I speak

The best texts read δὲ butinstead of γάρ forThe sentence does not state the reason for the prominence of the Gentiles asserted in Romans 11:12, but makes a transition from the statement of the divine plan to the statement of Paul's own course of working on the line of that plan. He labors the more earnestly for the Gentiles with a view to the salvation of his own race.

Inasmuch as I am

The best texts insert οὖν thenSo Rev.; thus disconnecting the clause from the preceding, and connecting it with what follows.

I magnify mine office ( τὴν διακονίαν μου δοξάζω )

Lit., I glorify my ministry, as Rev. Not I praise, but I honor by the faithful discharge of its duties. He implies, however, that the office is a glorious one. The verb, which occurs about sixty times in the New Testament, most frequently in John, is used, with very few exceptions, of glorifying God or Christ. In Romans 8:30, of God's elect. In 1 Corinthians 12:26, of the members of the body. In Revelation 18:7, of Babylon. For ministry, see on minister, Matthew 20:26.


Copyright Statement
The text of this work is public domain.

Bibliography
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Romans 11:13". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/romans-11.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

For I speak to you Gentiles, inasmuch as I am the apostle of the Gentiles, I magnify mine office:

I magnify my office — Far from being ashamed of ministering to the gentiles, I glory therein; the rather, as it may be a means of provoking my brethren to jealousy.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Romans 11:13". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/romans-11.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

13.For to you Gentiles I speak, etc. He confirms by a strong reason, that nothing shall be lost by the Gentiles, were the Jews to return again to favor with God; for he shows, that the salvation of both is so connected, that it can by the same means be promoted. For he thus addresses the Gentiles, — “Though I am peculiarly destined to be your Apostle, and ought therefore with special care to seek your salvation, with which I am charged, and to omit as it were all other things, and to labor for that only, I shall yet be faithfully discharging my office, by gaining to Christ any of my own nation; and this will be for the glory of my ministry, and so for your good.” (352) For whatever served to render Paul’s ministry illustrious, was advantageous to the Gentiles, whose salvation was its object.

And here also he uses the verb παραζηλῶσαι, to provoke to emulation, and for this purpose, that the Gentiles might seek the accomplishment of Moses’ prophecy, such as he describes, when they understood that it would be for their benefit.

13.For I say this to you Gentiles (as I am indeed the Apostle of the Gentiles,) that I render my ministry glorious,

14.If I shall by any means excite to emulation my own flesh and save some of them.

The sentiment in the last clause is the same as that at the end of Romans 11:11. TheVulgate, and some of the Latin Fathers, and also [Luther ], read δοξάσω in the future tense; which would make the passage read better, — “that I shall render,” etc. These two verses are not necessarily connected with the Apostle’s argument; for in the following verse he resumes the subject of Romans 11:12, or rather, as his usual manner is, he states the same thing in other words and in more explicit and stronger terms. So that the γὰρ in the next verse may very properly be rendered “yea,” or as an illative, “then.” — Ed.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Romans 11:13". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/romans-11.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

13 For I speak to you Gentiles, inasmuch as I am the apostle of the Gentiles, I magnify mine office:

Ver. 13. I magnify mine office] I make the utmost of it by gaining souls to Christ.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Romans 11:13". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/romans-11.html. 1865-1868.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Observe here, 1. The honourable office which St. Paul was called to; namely, to be an apostle, and the apostle of the Gentiles.

2. The honour which God put upon him in the faithful execution of that office: (1.) In making him instrumental for calling many of the blind and ignorant Gentiles to the obedience of the faith:

(2.) In provoking the Jews (whom he called his own flesh, because of his own nation) not to suffer the Gentiles alone to go away with the privileges of the gospel, but to put in for a share with them: If by any means I may provoke to emulation.

As if the apostle had said, "O that I could once see an holy emulation take hold of my countrymen; that rather than not believe at all, and be saved, I might see them at last believe for anger, or for very shame, and go to heaven in a holy chafe."

Observe, 3. What an argument the apostle makes use of, why all persons should greatly desire the general conversion both of Jews and Gentiles to the faith of Christ.

As the casting away of the Jews at present, will be the reconciling of the world; that is, by an occasion of sending the gospel to the Gentiles all the world over, whereby they become reconciled unto God; what will the receiving of the Jews again into the grace and favour of God, and the communion of the visible church, be to you Gentiles are brought into it, that it will be looked upon as a new life, or resurrection from the dead.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Romans 11:13". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/romans-11.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

13.] ‘Why, in an argument concerning the Jews, dwell so much on the reference to the Gentiles discernible in the divine œconomy regarding Israel? Why make it appear as if the treatment of God’s chosen people were regulated not by a consideration of them, but of the less favoured Gentiles?’ The present verse gives an answer to this question. But (apology for the foregoing verse:—if γάρ be read, the sense will be much the same—For (i.e. let it be understood, that), &c.) I am speaking to you the Gentiles. Inasmuch therefore ( μὲν οὖν is surely not to be rejected as yielding no sense,—as De Wette and Tholuck, who object to it as proceeding from those who hold a new sentence to begin at ἐφʼ ὅσον, and ὑμῖν.… ἔθνεσιν to refer to the foregoing:—but the usage of μὲν οὖν in 1 Corinthians 6:4 seems strictly analogous to that in our text, where no new sentence is begun in any sense which may not be true here.

ἐφʼ ὅσον, not ‘as long as,’ as Orig(103) and Vulg.) as I am Apostle of the Gentiles, I honour mine office (by striving for their conversion and edification at all times,—by introducing a reference to them and their part in the divine counsels, even when speaking of mine own people), if by any means I may (regarding it as a real service done on behalf of Israel, thus to honour mine office by mentioning the Gentiles, if this mention may) provoke to jealousy mine own flesh (the Jews) and may save some of them.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Romans 11:13". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/romans-11.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Romans 11:13. ὑμῖν) to you, not that you may be elated, but that the Jews may be invited.— διακονίαν, ministry) apostleship among the Gentiles.— δοξάζω, magnify) To wit, Paul enhances the grace given to the Gentiles and its fulness, as about to be reciprocated upon [towards] the Israelites themselves [intended to have a reflex influence on Israel]; and here he gives a reason for his so enhancing that grace.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Romans 11:13". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/romans-11.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

i.e. I speak to you of being rich in the faith above the Jews, because I challenge a special interest in you, inasmuch as

I am appointed to be the apostle of the Gentiles, and am sent chiefly unto them: see Romans 15:16 Acts 9:15 13:2 22:21 26:17 Galatians 1:16 2:7 Ephesians 3:8 2 Timothy 1:11. And therefore, in thus setting forth your privileges and blessings:

I magnify mine office.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Romans 11:13". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/romans-11.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

I magnify mine office; his office as apostle to the Gentiles. This he showed to be highly honorable, as connected with the plan of God for the salvation of men.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Romans 11:13". "Family Bible New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/romans-11.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

13. ὑμῖν δὲτοῖς ἔθνεσιν. A dramatic turn: not, of course, implying that those to whom he was writing were all Gentiles; cf. Romans 2:1; Romans 2:17.

ἐφ' ὅσον μὲν οὖν κ.τ.λ. The particles must be separated. οὖν = well then, introducing what he has to say to Gentiles. μὲν finds its antithesis in δὲ, Romans 11:17. His stress upon the mission to the Gentiles does not prevent him seeing their real position. There is still the note of apologia: from Romans 9:1 he has been defending his position as apostle of the Gentiles; and here he completes the defence. Hence the emphatic ἐγώ.

ἐφ' ὅσον, so far as I am …; the description does not exhaust the meaning of his office; it has a bearing upon Jews as well.

ἐθνῶν ἀπόστολος. This seems to be the only instance in N.T. of the gen. after ἀπ. describing the persons to whom the apostle is sent.

τὴν διακονίαν. Of the apostolic office; cf. 2 Corinthians 4:1; 2 Corinthians 5:18; 1 Timothy 1:12.

δοξάζω. Cf. John 8:54; Hebrews 5:5; Revelation 18:7 = magnify. The Apostle may magnify his office, for the purpose which he states; but this must not lead his converts to exult over the excluded (κατακαυχῶ, Romans 11:17).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
"Commentary on Romans 11:13". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/romans-11.html. 1896.

William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament

13. “But I speak to you Gentiles. Therefore, indeed, as much as I am the apostle of the Gentiles, I glorify my ministry,


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Godbey, William. "Commentary on Romans 11:13". "William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ges/romans-11.html.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

13. I speak—As if he had both classes in the Roman Church within his eye and voice. Yet he truly spake to both races in the then future centuries.

Magnify—Hold it of high consequence by a bold exertion of its powers.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Romans 11:13". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/romans-11.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Romans 11:13. But I am sneaking to you Gentiles. ‘But’ is better supported than ‘for.’ The clause implies the preponderance of Gentile Christians in the congregation at Rome. We do not regard Romans 11:13-14 as parenthetical, but as meeting a thought which might arise in the minds of the Gentile readers, namely, that his ministry, as the Apostle to the Gentiles, had no reference to the Jews. He shows that the blessed results to the Jews formed a part of the purpose of his labors (Romans 11:14). Others think the implied objection relates to the prominence given to the Gentiles in God’s purpose respecting the Jews. But it is unlikely that the Gentiles would raise such an objection. Godet differs from both views, and finds in these verses a proof that the Apostle was laboring for the ultimate benefit of the Gentiles by seeking the conversion of the Jews, since the latter would result in ‘life from the dead’ (Romans 11:15), and thus bring blessing to the Gentiles. But the first view is to be preferred.

Inasmuch then, etc. ‘Then’ is well supported, and disconnects the clause from what precedes. We separate the clauses by a colon; others explain:’ I say to you Gentiles, inasmuch,’ etc. But ‘then’ opposes this view.

I am, etc. ‘I’ is emphatic here.

I glorify my ministry; i.e., his ministry to the Gentiles. ‘Glorify’ is not = praise, or, magnify; the meaning is, by faithfully discharging the duties of this specific ministry he could do honor to it. The original suggests that there is another phase of the subject, which is stated (though not in exact correlation) in the next verse.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Romans 11:13". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/romans-11.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Romans 11:13 f. ὑμῖν δὲ λέγω τοῖς ἔθνεσιν. Paul does not here address a new class of readers. He has been speaking all along to a Gentile church, and speaking to it in that character (see above, pp. 561 ff.); and he feels it necessary to show the relevance, in such circumstances, of bestowing so much attention on the condition and prospects of the Jews. His mission to the Gentiles has an indirect bearing on his own countrymen; the more successful he can make it, the greater is the prospect that some of the Jews also may be provoked to jealousy and saved. Every Jew, again, who is saved, goes to make up the πλήρωμα of Romans 11:12, and so to bring on a time of unimaginable blessing for the Gentile world. ἐφʼ ὅσον Matthew 25:40. μὲν οὖν is printed in all the critical editions, but Sanday and Headlam would read μενοῦν as one word, and discount the restrictive force of the μέν, which suggests that apostleship to Gentiles was but one part of Paul’s mission. ἐγὼ: the pronoun expresses not merely a noble consciousness of vocation, but Paul’s feeling that in his particular case at all events a mission to the Gentiles could not but include this ulterior reference to the Jews. His devotion, accordingly, to his Gentile ministry, never let them fall out of view. “As far then as apostleship to Gentiles is represented by me (as no doubt it is) I glorify my ministry (by faithful discharge of it), if by any means I may save some of the Jews.” For the interpretation of δοξάζω see 2 Thessalonians 3:1, John 17:4. For εἴ πως see Buttmann, p. 255 f. τινὰς ἐξ αὐτῶν: disenchanting experience taught him to speak thus. cf. 1 Corinthians 9:22.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Romans 11:13". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/romans-11.html. 1897-1910.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

Romans 11:13 But I speak to you that are Gentiles. Inasmuch then as I am an apostle of Gentiles, I glorify my ministry;

At this point Paul has something to say to the Gentiles. Apparently there was a real danger that some Gentile Christians had become arrogant concerning their inclusion and the Jewish exclusion. It appears that some might have thought that God was through with any of Jewish heritage.

"I am an apostle of Gentiles"-(Acts 26:17-18; Galatians 2:7-8)

"I glorify my ministry"-"I take pride in my ministry" (Wey). For a man of Paul"s rich Jewish background (), to say that he was proud to be the apostle to the Gentiles, demonstrates a man whose life had been radically changed.

Paul is being careful with his language here. He says, "I"m proud that God wanted me to preach to Gentiles, I want Gentiles saved too", and yet at the same time, he is reminding the Gentiles, "and God still wants Jews saved too".


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Romans 11:13". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/romans-11.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

apostle. App-189.

magnify = glorify. Seep. 1511.

office = ministry. App-190.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Romans 11:13". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/romans-11.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

For I speak to you Gentiles, inasmuch as I am the apostle of the Gentiles, I magnify mine office:

I speak ('I am speaking') to you Gentiles - another proof that this Epistle was addressed not to Jewish but to Gentile believers (see the note at Romans 1:13),

Inasmuch, as I am the apostle of the Gentiles, I magnify ('glorify') mine office. The clause beginning with "inasmuch" should be read as a parenthesis.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Romans 11:13". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/romans-11.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

I am speaking now. The church at Rome was made up of both Jewish and Gentile Christians. It is important for Gentile Christians to have the right attitude toward Jewish Christians, since they are ONE in Christ (Galatians 3:28)! An apostle to the Gentiles. "As apostleship to the Gentiles is represented by me, I take pride in my work (by working hard at it), hoping to save some of my own people by making them jealous."


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Romans 11:13". "The Bible Study New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/romans-11.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(13) For I speak to you Gentiles.—The connecting particles in this verse must be altered according to an amended reading. “For” should be omitted, a full stop placed after “Gentiles,” and “then” inserted after “inasmuch.” “I speak to you Gentiles”—spoken with something of a pause. “Inasmuch then” (or, in so far then) “as I am the Apostle of the Gentiles, I seek to do honour to my office. But not without an arrière-pensée. My motive is at least partly to win over my own countrymen.”


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Romans 11:13". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/romans-11.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

For I speak to you Gentiles, inasmuch as I am the apostle of the Gentiles, I magnify mine office:
the apostle
15:16-19; Acts 9:15; 13:2; 22:21; 26:17,18; Galatians 1:16; 2:2,7-9; Ephesians 3:8; 1 Timothy 2:7; 2 Timothy 1:11,12; mou" translation="">I magnify mine office. Rather, "I honour my ministry," [diakonia mou

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Romans 11:13". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/romans-11.html.

Hodge's Commentary on Romans, Ephesians and First Corintians

For I speak to you Gentiles, in as much as I am the apostle to the Gentiles. This and the following verse contain a transient remark relating to the apostle's own feelings and mode of acting in reference to the subject in hand. His readers were not to suppose, that because he was the apostle to the Gentiles, his labors had no reference to the Jews, or that he was unconcerned about their salvation. This passage is therefore connected with the last clause of the preceding verse, in which Paul had said that the conversion of the Gentiles was adapted and designed to bring about the restoration of the Jews. These two events, instead of being at all inconsistent, were intimately related, so that both ought to be kept constantly in view, and all efforts to promote the former had a bearing on the accomplishment of the latter. This being the case, the Gentiles ought to consider the restoration of the Jews as in no respect inimical to their interests, but as on every account most desirable. Paul therefore says, that what he had just stated in reference to the effect on the Jews, of the conversion of the Gentiles, he designed specially for the latter. He wished them to consider that fact, as it would prevent any unkind feelings towards the Jews. He had the better right thus to speak, as to him, especially, "the gospel of the uncircumcision had been committed." He himself, in all he did to secure the salvation of the Gentiles, or to render his office successful, had an eye to the conversion of the Jews. The word ( δοξάζω) rendered I magnify, means, first, to praise, to estimate, and speak highly of a thing; secondly, to render glorious, as Romans 8:30, "Whom he justifies, them he also glorifies;" and so in a multitude of cases. Either sense of the word suits this passage. The latter, however, is much better adapted to the following verse, and therefore is to be preferred: ‘I endeavor to render my office glorious by bringing as many Gentiles as possible into the Redeemer's kingdom; if so be it may provoke and arouse my countrymen.' His magnifying his office consisted in the faithful discharge of its duties; and in thus laboring assiduously for the salvation of the Gentiles, he aimed also at the salvation of the Jews. "Sic gentes alloquitur: Quum sim vobis peculiariter destinatus apostolus ideoque salutem vestram mihi commissam singulari quodam studio debeam procurare, et quasi rebus omnibus omissis unum illud agere: officio tamen meo fideliter fungar, si quos e mea gente Christo lucrifecero: idque erit in gloriam ministerii mei, atque adeo in vestrum bonum." — Calvin. The object of the apostle, therefore, in these verses, is to declare that he always acted under the influence of the truth announced at the close of the 12th verse. He endeavored to make the conversion of the Gentiles a means of good to the Jews.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Hodge, Charles. "Commentary on Romans 11:13". Hodge's Commentary on Romans, Ephesians and First Corintians. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hdg/romans-11.html.

Lectionary Calendar
Thursday, April 18th, 2019
Maundy Thursday
There are 3 days til Easter!
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient contact form
Powered by Lightspeed Technology