Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Samuel 15:30

And David went up the ascent of the Mount of Olives, and wept as he went, and his head was covered and he walked barefoot. Then all the people who were with him each covered his head and went up weeping as they went.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Citizens;   David;   Dust;   Love;   Loyalty;   Mourning;   Olives, Mount of;   Weeping;   Zadok;   Thompson Chain Reference - Shoes Removed;   Weeping;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Feet, the;   Head;   Shoes;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Garments;   Olives, Mount of;   Sandals;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Head;   Jerusalem;   Zadok;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Head, Headship;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Barefoot;   Dress;   Kidron;   Olves, Mount of;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Dress;   Foot;   Kedron;   Mourning;   Mulberry Trees;   Olives, Mount of;   Sandal;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Gestures;   Grief and Mourning;   Olives, Mount of;   Samuel, Books of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Dress;   Foot;   Head;   Olives, Mount of;   Samuel, Books of;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Ahithophel ;   Kidron, Kedron, Brook;   Olives, Olivet, Mount of;   Zadok ;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Cedron;   Mount olivet;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Absalom;   David;   Garments;   Jerusalem;   Kidron;   Olives;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Ahim'a-Az;   Dress;   Kid'ron,;   Mourning;   Olives, Mount of;   Ol'ivet;   Sandal;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Olives;   Shoes;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Hebrew Monarchy, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Ascent;   Barefoot;   Dress;   Gesture;   Going;   Head;   Olives, Mount of;   Zadok;   Kitto Biblical Cyclopedia - Ahimaaz;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Abiathar;   Barefoot;   Costume;   Kidron;   Sandals;   Shoe;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Had his head covered - This was not only the attitude of a mourner, but even of a culprit; they usually had their heads covered when condemned. See the case of Haman. When the king had pronounced his condemnation, they immediately covered his face, and led him out to punishment; Esther 7:8; (note). See also Quintus Curtius, De Philota, cap. vi.: I, Lictor; caput obnubito.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 15:30". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/2-samuel-15.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

His head covered - See the marginal references and Jeremiah 14:3-4; Ezekiel 24:17; the sign of deep mourning.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 15:30". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/2-samuel-15.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

DAVID RECEIVED THE BAD NEWS ABOUT AHITHOPHEL

"But David went up the ascent of the mount of Olives, weeping as he went, barefoot, and with his head covered; and all the people who were with him covered their heads, and they went up, weeping as they went. And it was told David, `Ahithophel is among the conspirators with Absalom.' And David said, `O Lord, I pray thee turn the counsel of Ahithophel into foolishness.'"

This account of David's leaving the city of Jerusalem, barefoot and with his head covered, weeping as he went was called by Tatum, "One of the saddest passages in the Bible."[23]

"Ahithophel is among the conspirators with Absalom" (2 Samuel 15:31). This was a terrible blow indeed to David, as indicated by David's pouring out his heartbreak in one of the Psalms written on this occasion. He responded to the sad news with a prayer.

"O Lord turn the counsel of Ahithophel into foolishness" (2 Samuel 15:31). God answered his prayer at once. Hushai agreed to return to Jerusalem to keep David informed of things he might hear there concerning Absalom's strategy,"[24] and also to frustrate, if possible, the counsel of Ahithophel.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 15:30". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/2-samuel-15.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And David went up by the ascent of Mount Olivet,.... So called from the olive trees that grew upon it, which is often mentioned in the New Testament, and where our Lord Jesus Christ, the antitype of David, often was, in his state of humiliation, Matthew 26:30, and from whence he ascended to heaven after his resurrection, Acts 1:12; it was about a mile from Jerusalem, to the east of it:

and wept as he went up; thinking perhaps of the wickedness and rebellion of his son, of his own hard case, to be obliged to quit his metropolis and palace, and make his flight afoot; and perhaps also of his own sins, which were the cause of his calamities:

and had his head covered; with his mantle, with which he enwraped himself as a mourner, 2 Samuel 19:4; so the Egyptians used to cover their heads in mourning, and the Romans in later timesF17Vid. Solerium de Pileo, sect. 2. p. 14, 19. ; so Megara in sorrowful circumstances is represented as having her head covered with a garmentF18Senec. Hercul. furens, act. 2. :

and he went barefoot; in token of mourning also, and like one forlorn, and going into captivity, see Isaiah 20:2,

and all the people that was with him covered every man his head; as David did, and in imitation of him, and sympathizing with him; and which was sometimes done when men were ashamed and confounded, Jeremiah 14:3,

and they went up, weeping as they went up; the mount of Olivet, grieved for their king, and the distresses and calamities that were coming upon them.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 15:30". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-samuel-15.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And David went up by the ascent of [mount] Olivet, and wept as he went up, and had his head s covered, and he went barefoot: and all the people that [was] with him covered every man his head, and they went up, weeping as they went up.

(s) With ashes and dust in sign of sorrow.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 15:30". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/2-samuel-15.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

David went up by the ascent of mount Olivet — The same pathway over that mount has been followed ever since that memorable day.

had his head covered — with a mourning wrapper. The humility and resignation of David marked strongly his sanctified spirit, induced by contrition for his transgressions. He had fallen, but it was the fall of the upright; and he rose again, submitting himself meekly in the meantime to the will of God [Chalmers].

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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 15:30". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/2-samuel-15.html. 1871-8.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

(30) And David went up by the ascent of mount Olivet, and wept as he went up, and had his head covered, and he went barefoot: and all the people that was with him covered every man his head, and they went up, weeping as they went up.

How very suitable a frame was David now in! He saw the hand of God in this affliction. This gave the additional bitterness to it. Moreover, be knew not what the event might be. Either way, in success, or the contrary, it was full of evil. If he conquered, it was a son, a beloved son, he subdued. If he fell himself, death would be the consequence. In such a state, as a mourner, he might well go barefoot and weeping. But Reader! can you accompany David in idea up the ascent of Mount Olivet, and not recollect that holy mourner there, David's Lord? Surely! no true believer in Christ can ever hear, or read, the name of Olivet, without connecting with it Jesus, and his agonies there. That was the memorable spot where thy Redeemer, my soul, sweat drops of blood, when the agony and convulsion of his soul was so great in sustaining all the weight and pressure of the divine justice due to thy sins, that David's grief for Absalom compared to it was but as nothing. Here the powers of hell besieged him also, until it became necessary that an angel from heaven should be dispatched to strengthen him. And Reader! you will not forget, I hope, how the Son of God in that tremendous hour in Olivet, was agitated backward and forward; when his whole soul was exceeding sorrowful, even unto death; and when his few faithful disciples were drenched in sleep, as if on purpose that no help, no comfort, should be afforded him: and that, in redemption-work, of the people there should be none with him. Isaiah 63:8.

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 15:30". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/2-samuel-15.html. 1828.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And David went up by the ascent of mount Olivet, and wept as he went up, and had his head covered, and he went barefoot: and all the people that was with him covered every man his head, and they went up, weeping as they went up.

Barefoot — In testimony of his deep sorrow, and humiliation and shame for his sins.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 15:30". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/2-samuel-15.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Samuel 15:30 And David went up by the ascent of [mount] Olivet, and wept as he went up, and had his head covered, and he went barefoot: and all the people that [was] with him covered every man his head, and they went up, weeping as they went up.

Ver. 30. And wept as he went up.] Bewailing his own sins, and the deplorable state of the commonwealth at that time.

And had his head covered.] As was and is still the guise and garb of mourners, [2 Samuel 19:4 Esther 6:12 Jeremiah 14:3] partly for secrecy’s sake, and partly for seriousness, that their minds might not be diverted or distracted. For which cause also our modern Jews do in their synagogues put on each man his taleth or square vestment, turning it back about their neck, that so they may be the more attentive at their prayers, without looking aside any way. (a)

And he went barefoot.] In token of sorrow and shame. [Isaiah 20:3-4] Whether his bare feet by the hard stones were forced to yield bloody tokens of his humiliation, as our Henry II did when he went on pilgrimage to Becket’s sepulchre, (b) we have not to say. Muleasses, king of Tunis, fleeing from his son Amida (another Absalom), was betrayed and taken by the sweet odours he had about him, and could not be without, no not in so great a danger.

And all the people.] Regis ad exemplum, &c. They sympathised.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 15:30". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-samuel-15.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

2 Samuel 15:30. And David went up by the ascent of mount Olivet, and wept, &c.— A more memorable event surely was never recorded in history, nor a more moving spectacle ever exhibited to mortal eyes: a king, venerable for his years and victories, sacred in the character both of his piety and prophesies, renowned for prowess, and revered for wisdom, reduced to the condition of a fugitive, to a sudden and extreme necessity of flying for his life, and from the presence of his own son, his darling and delight. In this condition he went up the mount, and, when he reached the summit of it, fell down prostrate before God. Josephus tells us, that when he reached the top of the mountain, he took a view of the city, and prayed to God with abundance of tears. It may be thought worth notice, that Josephus should tell us, that David wept and viewed the city in the same spot from which the Evangelist informs us our blessed Saviour wept over it.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 15:30". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/2-samuel-15.html. 1801-1803.

Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae

DISCOURSE: 320

DAVID’S SUBMISSION TO HIS AFFLICTIONS

2 Samuel 15:30. And David went up by the ascent of Mount Olivet, and wept as he went up, and had his head covered, and he went barefoot: and all the people that was with him covered every man his head, and they went up, weeping as they went up.

A CONSCIOUSNESS of ill desert has a tendency to reconcile us to the afflictions with which our sins are visited. In some respect indeed it embitters our trials, which the testimony of a good conscience would alleviate: but in other respects it has a good effect, in that it silences every murmur against the dispensations of a righteous Providence. The troubles which David had experienced in his family as the punishment of his own sins, had already been great and manifold: but in the rebellion of Absalom they were risen to their height: they were borne however with a spirit of piety suited to his state, and worthy of his high character.

Let us consider,

I. The circumstances in which he was placed—

These were most afflictive—

[He was now driven from his throne, banished from the ordinances of religion, and in danger of immediate destruction. Now considering him as a man, such adversity must be painful in the extreme; and still more when we recollect that he was a king, and therefore susceptible of pain in proportion to the degradation which he suffered. But view him as a man of humanity, and then how distressing must it be to see his country involved in civil war, and to be himself on the eve of a bloody engagement with thousands of his own subjects! View him also as a man of piety, driven from the ordinances of religion, and suffering under the rebukes of an offended God; what can be conceived more distressing than such a state as his?]

But they derived ten-fold poignancy from the source from whence they flowed—

[The people that inflicted these wounds were his own subjects. Had he been attacked by foreign enemies, he would have gone forth against them with alacrity: but to be constrained to fight with those over whom he had reigned so many years, in whose defence he had so often exposed his own life, and for whose benefit he had laboured all his days, this filled him with the deepest grief [Note: Psalms 55:1-8 with Zechariah 13:6.].

But amongst the insurgents was his own peculiar friend, from whose counsel and assistance he might have derived the greatest benefit. How keenly he felt this disappointment, we learn from the lamentation he poured out on this memorable occasion [Note: Psalms 55:12-14.]: and who that has known the sweets of friendship must not sympathize with him? But the bitterest ingredient in his cup was, that it was mixed for him by his own son; that son, whom he had so recently, and so undeservedly received to favour, and in whose professions of piety he had begun to rejoice [Note: 2 Samuel 15:7-9.]. As the most exalted joys, so also the acutest sorrows, flow from those who stand to us in the relation of children: and in proportion as this worthless son was beloved by him, was the anguish occasioned by his rebellious conduct. The insulting language of Shimei was of no account in the mind of David; that he was willing to bear [Note: 2 Samuel 16:5-11.]: but to be so treated by his beloved Absalom, was a grief almost insupportable [Note: ver. 30.]. And we doubt not but that every tender parent will readily understand how greatly such a consideration must have overwhelmed his mind.]

Let us next proceed to notice,

II. His conduct under those circumstances—

Zadok and Abiathar had brought to him the ark, judging that it must be a comfort and a benefit to him to have access to God under his heavy trials. But David ordered them to carry back the ark, being himself prepared for every event, inasmuch as he enjoyed in his own soul,

1. A confidence in God’s care—

[David well knew that God’s presence was not confined to the ark, nor his agency necessarily connected with it. He knew that wherever his enemies might drive him, God’s ear would be open to his prayer, and his arm be extended for his relief. Hence, though he honoured the ark as the symbol of God’s presence, he did not confide in it: but trusted in God, who was represented by it. He knew that, if God should be on his side, the efforts of his enemies would be all in vain; and that, however menacing their aspect at the present, he should in due time be brought back again in safety.

Such is the confidence which God’s people should maintain under all the trials which they may be called to endure. “The name of God is a strong tower to which they may run,” and in which they may defy their bitterest enemies. “If He be for them, none can be against them;” “nor can any weapon that is formed against them prosper.” It is the privilege of every saint to know, that his affairs are in God’s hands; and that as nothing can be done but by the divine permission, so nothing shall be done, which shall not work for his spiritual and eternal good. The language of his soul therefore should at all times be, “The Lord is on my side; I will not fear what flesh can do unto me” — — —]

2. A submission to his will—

[What God might have ordained respecting him, David did not know; nor was he curious to inquire: but, whatever might be the issue of his present afflictions, he was contented and satisfied. Well he knew that he deserved all that God could lay upon him; and he was ready to say, “I will bear the indignation of the Lord, because I have sinned against him [Note: Micah 7:9.].” This is one fruit of sin, if I may so speak; or rather, of that humiliation which accompanies true repentance: we become reconciled to whatever God may do, seeing that any chastisement in this world must be less than our iniquities have deserved. O that in the prospect of the heaviest calamities we might have such a view of our ill desert, as should dispose us humbly to commit ourselves into God’s hands, and cordially to welcome every trial which his all-wise providence may appoint for us! Under every affliction, our acquiescence should be like that of Eli, “It is the Lord, let him do what seemeth him good.”]

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Simeon, Charles. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 15:30". Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/shh/2-samuel-15.html. 1832.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

He went barefoot, in testimony of his deep sorrow, and humiliation and shame for his sins, whereby he had procured, this evil to himself; for these were the habits of mourners, 2 Samuel 19:4 Esther 6:12 Isaiah 20:3,4 Jer 14:3,4; and to take a holy revenge upon himself for his former delicacy and luxury.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Samuel 15:30". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-samuel-15.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

30.Head covered’ barefoot’ weeping — Thus both the king and his people in deep self-abasement humble themselves before the penal chastisements of God.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 15:30". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-samuel-15.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

2 Samuel 15:30. David went up by the ascent of mount Olivet, and wept as he went up — To think that one who was the offspring of his own body should thus lift up the heel against him, and reflecting on his own conduct in the matter of Uriah, as the cause of this calamity. And had his head covered — Through shame and confusion. And he went up barefoot — In testimony of his deep sorrow and humiliation for the sins whereby he had procured this evil to himself; for these were the habits of mourners; and to take a holy revenge upon himself for his former delicacy and luxury. “A more memorable event, surely, was never recorded in history, nor a more moving spectacle exhibited to mortal eyes! A king, venerable for his years and victories; sacred in the characters, both of his piety and prophecy; renowned for prowess, and revered for wisdom, reduced to the condition of a fugitive! to a sudden and extreme necessity of fleeing for his life, from the presence of his own son, his darling and delight; and a whole country loudly lamenting his fate! In this condition, David went up the mount, and when he reached the summit of it, fell down prostrate before God. Josephus tells us, that when David reached the top of the mountain, he took a view of the city, and prayed to God with abundance of tears. The reader will perhaps think it worth his notice, that Josephus should tell us, that David wept and viewed the city in the same spot from which, the evangelist informs us, our blessed Saviour wept over it.” — Delaney. And is this the glorious king of Israel, the beloved of God, the wise, the victorious David, who slew his ten thousands? Strange change indeed! What has produced this sad reverse? Sin alone has wrought all this! These are its baneful effects: he forgot the commandment of the Lord his God, and from hence has flowed all this evil! You that plead an excuse for sin, because David, the man after God’s own heart, fell into it; remember, likewise, what bitter and grievous punishments he underwent for it. Are you willing to pay such a price for sin? And yet, be assured, the inviolable laws of God require you to pay it in one way or other.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 15:30". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/2-samuel-15.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Weeping, &c. David on this occasion wept for his sins, which he knew were the cause of all his sufferings. (Challoner) --- Barefoot, like a criminal, or one in mourning, Isaias xx. 4., and Ezechiel xxiv. 17. (Calmet) --- Covered, that the people might not see him. (Worthington)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 15:30". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/2-samuel-15.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Olivet. Name due to the Vulgate Oliveti in Acts 1:12.

wept. Compare Luke 19:41.

head covered. Symbol for self-condemnation.

barefoot. Symbol of mourning. Isaiah 20:2, Isaiah 20:4. Ezekiel 24:17.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 15:30". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-samuel-15.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And David went up by the ascent of mount Olivet, and wept as he went up, and had his head covered, and he went barefoot: and all the people that was with him covered every man his head, and they went up, weeping as they went up.

The ascent of mount Olivet - so called from its olive groves. Its situation is east of Jerusalem, from which it is separated by the valley of Jehoshaphat and the brook Kidron. Josephus reckons the distance at five stadia ('Antiquities,' b. 20:, ch. 6:), and Luke (Acts 1:12) says it was a Sabbath day's journey, namely, to the top. The same pathway over that mount has been followed ever since that memorable day.

Had his head covered - with a mourning wrapper (cf. 2 Samuel 19:4; Esther 6:12; Ezekiel 12:6). The humility and resignation of David marked strongly his sanctified spirit, induced by contrition for his transgressions. He had fallen, but it was the fall of the upright; and he rose again, submitting himself meekly in the meantime to the will of God (Chalmers). See examples of king Darius having his head covered, Q. Curtius, lib. 4:, cap.

10., sec. 33; and lib. 5:, cap. 12, sec. 8.

And he went barefoot. Walking barefoot was a token of profound distress-all the more significant that the barefooted pedestrian was of high rank. Anciently persons of station and opulence wore shoes formed of very costly materials, ornamented with gold, silver, or jewels. On the occurrence of some calamity, public or private, the mourners divested themselves of all their ornaments, down to their shoes, and walked barefoot (see Bynoeus de Calceis. 'Hebraeorum,' lib. 2:, cap. 5; Braunius de Vestitu, 'Sacerd. Hebr.,' pp. 45, 46; Guier, 'De Luctu,' cap. 15:, sec. 4).

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 15:30". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/2-samuel-15.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And David went up by the ascent of mount Olivet, and wept as he went up, and had his head covered, and he went barefoot: and all the people that was with him covered every man his head, and they went up, weeping as they went up.
the ascent
Zechariah 14:4; Luke 19:29,37; 21:37; 22:39; Acts 1:12
mount Olivet
Mount Olivet, so called from its abounding with olive trees, is situated east of Jerusalem, being separated from it only by the valley of Jehoshaphat and the brook Kidron. Josephus says it is five stadia, i.e., 625 geometrical paces from Jerusalem; and St. Luke (Ac 1:12) says it is a Sabbath day's journey, or about eight stadia distant, i.e., to the summit. It forms part of a ridge of limestone hills, extending from north to south for about a mile; and it is described as having three, or, according to others, four summits; the central and highest of which overlooks the whole of the city, over whose streets and walls the eye roves as if in the survey of a model.
and wept as he went up
Heb. going up and weeping.
Psalms 42:3-11; 43:1,2,5; Luke 19:41
his head covered
This custom was only practised by persons in great distress, or when convicted of great crimes. Thus Darius, when informed by Tyriotes, the eunuch, that his queen was dead, and that she had suffered no violence from Alexander, covered his head, and wept a long time; then throwing off the garment that covered him, he thanked the gods for Alexander's moderation and justice.
19:4; Esther 6:12; Jeremiah 14:3,4
barefoot
Isaiah 20:2,4; Ezekiel 24:17,23
weeping
Psalms 126:5,6; Matthew 5:4; Romans 12:15; 1 Corinthians 12:26
Reciprocal: Leviticus 21:10 - uncover;  2 Samuel 15:32 - the top;  2 Samuel 16:1 - little past;  2 Samuel 19:24 - dressed his feet;  1 Kings 11:7 - the hill;  Job 9:24 - he covereth;  Isaiah 15:5 - with;  Ezekiel 12:6 - cover;  Mark 11:1 - at the;  Acts 20:37 - wept;  1 Corinthians 11:4 - having

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 15:30". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-samuel-15.html.