Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Samuel 5:8

David said on that day, "Whoever would strike the Jebusites, let him reach the lame and the blind, who are hated by David's soul, through the water tunnel." Therefore they say, "The blind or the lame shall not come into the house."
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Blind;   Jebusites;   Jerusalem;   Lameness;   Zion;   Thompson Chain Reference - Health-Disease;   Jebusites;   Lame, the;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Jerusalem;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Joab;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Disease;   Israel;   Jebusites;   Jerusalem;   Zion;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Devote, Devoted;   Psalms, Theology of;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Gutter;   Jebus;   Jerusalem;   Joab;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Jebus;   Jerusalem;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Aqueducts;   City of David;   Conduit;   Gihon;   Gutter;   Jerusalem;   Lame, Lameness;   Samuel, Books of;   Tribes of Israel, the;   Zion;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - House;   Israel;   Jebus, Jebusites;   Jerusalem;   Millo;   Samuel, Books of;   Solomon;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Gutter;   Jebusites ;   Jerusalem ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Jebus;   Jerusalem;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Division of the Earth;   Jerusalem;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Hebrew Monarchy, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Fortification;   Games;   House;   Jebus;   Jerusalem;   Joab;   Lame;   Samuel, Books of;   Watercourse;   Waterfall;   Zion;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - City;   Jebusites;   Jerusalem;   Samuel, Books of;  

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

i. e. “Whosoever will smite the Jebusites, let him reach both the lame and the blind, who are the hated of David‘s soul, by the gutter or water-course, and he shall be chief.” The only access to the citadel was where the water had worn a channel (some understand a subterranean channel), and where there was, in consequence, some vegetation in the rock. Joab (see the marginal reference) took the hint, and with all the activity that had distinguished his brother Anabel 2 Samuel 2:18, climbed up first. The blind and the lame are either literally such, placed there in derision by the Jebusites who thought the stronghold impregnable, or they are the Jebusite garrison, so called in derision by David.

Wherefore they said … - i. e. it became a proverb (as in 1 Samuel 19:24). The proverb seems merely to have arisen from the blind and the lame being the hated of David‘s soul, and hence, to have been used proverbially of any that were hated, or unwelcome, or disagreeable.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:8". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/2-samuel-5.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

2 Samuel 5:8

Whosoever getteth up to the gutter.

The assault upon Zion

“Some far-seeing Hittite or Amorite had designed from the inside of the city that a subterraneous passage should be cut through the rock to the spring below, so that in troublous times when the daughters of Zion could no longer venture outside the gates to draw water from the fountain, the needful supply should be obtainable without the knowledge of the besiegers, and without risk to the besieged.” (Harper.) There is strong presumption that David obtained information of this secret way through a citizen--Araunah the Jebusite. At all events whoever disclosed to him the singular viaduct--“gutter” of our Bibles--he issued forthwith the proclamation that an attack through it was feasible. This has received the amplest confirmation from two other well-known Palestine explorers by having themselves accomplished the feat. They worked their way up through this same covered passage. (J. R. Macduff, D. D.)

Storming the citadel

Joab stormed the stronghold of Zion, which the Jebusites thought-impregnable. Jonathan and his armour-bearer were scornfully despised by the Philistine garrison (2 Samuel 5:1-25.) So General Wolfe won the great victory which has made his name famous, by leading his men up the Heights of Abraham above Quebec, his French opponents not dreaming that such a feat was practicable.

Storming the fortress

The whole incident recalled a kindred adventure in Scottish history; when during the wars of the Douglas, Dumbarton Rock--550 feet in height, crowned with its fortress and castle, had its precipices of ballast sealed by a few daring men, with the aid of ladders and grappling irons and misty midnight. An ash tree growing in a crevice near the top served as an equivalent for what, in the water-course of Jebus, helped materially to crown the feat with success. (J. R. Macduff, D. D.)

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Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "2 Samuel 5:8". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/2-samuel-5.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And David said on that day,.... On which he took the strong hold of Zion:

whosoever getteth up to the gutter; where it is generally supposed the blind and lame were, whether images or real men: but what is meant by "Tzinnur", we render "gutter", is not easy to say; we follow some of the Jewish writers, who take it to be a canal, or water spout, used to carry off the water from roofs of houses into cisterns, as the word is rendered in Psalm 42:7; which is the only place besides this in which it is used in Scripture; but R. Isaiah takes it to be the bar or bolt of the gate, and the sense to be, whoever got up to the gate, and got in at that, unbolting it, or breaking through it; the Targum interprets it of the tower of the city, or strong fortress, and so Abarbinel; but Jarchi says it was a ditch, agreeably to which BochartF8Phaleg. l. 4. c. 36. col. 304. translates the words, and indeed more agreeably to the order of them;"whosoever smites the Jebusites, let him cast into the ditch (next the wall) both the blind and the lame, extremely hated by David.'But a learned modern writerF9Dr. Kennicott's Dissert. 1. p. 35. gives a more ingenious and probable interpretation of these words thus;"whosoever (first) smiteth the Jebusites, and through the subterraneous passages reaches the lame and the blind, &c.'and which seems to be favoured by Josephus, as he observes; who saysF11Ut supra. (Antiqu. l. 7. c. 3. sect. 1.) , the king promised the command of the whole army to him who should δια των υποκειμενων φαραγγων, "through the subterraneous cavities", go up to the citadel, and take it: to which I would add that the word is used in the Chaldee paraphrase of Ecclesiastes 1:7, of the several subterraneous passages, through which the rivers flow out of and reflow into the ocean: remarkable is the note of Theodoret,

"a certain Hebrew says, Aquila renders it "through a pipe"; on which, he observes, David being willing to spare the walls of the city, ordered the citizens should enter into the city by an aqueduct;'according to the Jews, there, was a cave underground, which reached from the king's house in Jerusalem to Jericho, when it was taken by Nebuchadnezzar; See Gill on Jeremiah 39:4; in which story there may be a mixture of fable; yet it is not improbable that there was such a subterraneous passage; since Dio CassiusF12Hist. l. 66. speaks of several such, through which the Jews made their escape in the last siege of the city:

and smiteth the Jebusites, and the lame and the blind; or even the lame and the blind men the Jebusites had placed to mock David; and therefore it follows:

that are hated of David's soul: because he was despised and jeered at by them, and through them: if these could be understood of their idols and images, the phrase would be easily accounted for, nothing being more abominable to David than idolatry:

he shall be chief and captain; these words are not in the original text here, but are supplied from 1 Chronicles 11:6; that is, he shall be chief commander of the army, as Joab became, who was the first that went up and smote them:

wherefore they said, the blind and the lame shall not come into the house; that is, either the Jebusites said this, that their images, called in derision by David the blind and the lame, if these did not keep David out, they should never be intrusted with the safety of their fort any moreF13Gregory, ut supra. (Notes and Observations, &c. ch. 7.) ; or rather because the blind and the lame men said this of David, he shall not come into the house, the fort, or citadel, therefore David hated them; which is the sense of the above learned writerF14Dr. Kennicott, ut supra. (Dissert. 1. p. 35.) .

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:8". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-samuel-5.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And David said on that day, Whosoever getteth up to the gutter, and smiteth the Jebusites, and the lame and the blind, [that are] hated of David's soul, [he shall be chief and captain]. Wherefore they said, The blind and the lame shall not d come into the house.

(d) The idols should no longer enter into that place.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:8". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/2-samuel-5.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Whosoever getteth up to the gutter — This is thought by some to mean a subterranean passage; by others a spout through which water was poured upon the fire which the besiegers often applied to the woodwork at the gateways, and by the projections of which a skilful climber might make his ascent good; a third class render the words, “whosoever dasheth them against the precipice” (1 Chronicles 11:6).

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:8". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/2-samuel-5.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And David said on that day, Whosoever getteth up to the gutter, and smiteth the Jebusites, and the lame and the blind, that are hated of David's soul, he shall be chief and captain. Wherefore they said, The blind and the lame shall not come into the house.

To the gutter — That is, whosoever scaleth the fort, or getteth up to the top of it, where the gutter was.

That are hated — The Jebusites, and the lame, and the blind, Who had probably themselves insulted him, and blasphemed God.

He shall be — These words are fitly supplied out of1Chronicles11:6, where they are expressed.

They said … — That is, whence it became a proverb, or a common saying, used by David, and others, the blind and the lame Jebusites, were set to keep the house, that is, the fort of Zion; and to keep others from coming into it; but now they are shut out of it, and none of them, either of the Jebusites, or of blind and lame persons, shall be admitted to come into it again. Which David might ordain, to keep up the memory of this great exploit, and of the insolent carriage of the Jebusites.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:8". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/2-samuel-5.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Samuel 5:8 And David said on that day, Whosoever getteth up to the gutter, and smiteth the Jebusites, and the lame and the blind, [that are] hated of David’s soul, [he shall be chief and captain]. Wherefore they said, The blind and the lame shall not come into the house.

Ver. 8. Whosoever getteth up to the gutter.] This bitter scoff had not so much encouraged as enraged David and his men to assault the fort, which they took by scaling, Joab venturing almost as hard for it, as that brave Englishman did, who, at the storming of an earthwork in the low countries, caught hold of a pike in the hand of his enemy, and was thereby drawn up to the taking of the place.

Wherefore they said.] Or, Because they had said, even the blind and the lame, He shall not come into the house, that is, into the hold. Now because they had put this scorn upon him, David was set upon it to have them out. So the king of France, jesting at William the Conqueror’s great belly, whereof he said he lay in at Rouen, so irritated him, as he being recovered of a sickness, entered France in the chiefest time of their fruits, making spoil of all in his way till he came even to Paris, where the king of France then was, to show him of his activity after his illness: and from thence marched to the city of Mentz, which he utterly sacked, &c. (a)

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:8". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-samuel-5.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

2 Samuel 5:8. Whosoever, &c.— Dr. Kennicott observes, that the Hebrew word צנור zinnor, gutter, occurs but once more in the Bible, and does not seem commonly understood in this place. The English version calls it a gutter; the Vulgate, pipes; Vatablus, channels; Junius and Tremellius, a common sewer; Poole, a pipe for water; and Bochart, a bed or channel of a river. But most interpreters agree in making the words signify something hollow, and in applying it to water; which might well be applied to a subterraneous passage, or great hollow, through which men could pass and repass for water. That this zinnor, in the text, was such an under-ground passage, might be strongly presumed from the text itself; but it is proved to have been so by Josephus. For, speaking of this very transaction, he says, "The citadel being as yet in possession of the enemy, the king promised that he would make any one general of all his forces who should ascend into the citadel through the subterraneous cavities." Here, then, we have the subterraneous cavities most remarkably answering to zenur, and putting this interpretation upon a very solid footing. I shall only add upon this point, that the true sense of the obscure word צנור zinnor in this place, remarkably occurs in the commentary of Hugo de Vienna; where it is explained by "subterraneous passages through which there was a communication to the town." That the preposition ב beth, prefixed in the Hebrew to zinnor, sometimes signifies through, is evident from Noldius; and that it signifies so in this place, is certain from the nature of the context, and the testimony of Josephus. See Antiq. lib. 7: cap. 3. Thus far Dr. Kennicott; upon which Dr. Chandler has the following remarks: "I am perfectly of his mind, that the blind and the lame were really such. But when David attacked the fort, he gave orders, that, 'whoever should smite the Jebusites, וינע veiiggng, let him smite also בצנור bezinnor, εν παραξι φιδι with the sword, as the LXX render it, both the lame and the blind.' And I think some instrument or weapon seems plainly to be intended by the very construction. And it may be observed, that and this word in the Arabic dialect signifies the handle of a shield, or a shield itself; and accordingly the Arabic and Syriac render the word in this very place by a shield; and this gives a good sense: 'Let him also strike with a shield both the blind and the lame.' We may observe also, that the word is rendered by the Chaldee, a strong hold; by Kimchi, the fortress, or strong place; and if we understand the word in this sense, the version will be, 'Whoever smites the Jebusites, let him also strike at, or in, the fortress, the lame and the blind.' If we understand by בצנור bezinnor, a canal, an aqueduct, water-pipe, or channel, we may then render the words, 'Whoever smites the Jebusites, let him also strike into the channel or brook, the blind and the lame.' That the future tense in the Hebrew is used for the imperative mood, is too well known to need any proof. Dr. Kennicott's conjecture, who renders the word by subterraneous passage, is certainly very ingenious, but I want authority for it." See Rev. p. 176. These lame and blind are said to be hated of David's soul. But certainly, as Houbigant well observes, they should rather be rendered, conformably to the Hebrew, as well as the LXX, who hate David's soul. The words, he shall be chief and captain, are not in the Hebrew. David's proposal to the army is begun, and a circumstance or two mentioned; but the reward proposed, and the person rewarded, are totally omitted. The words in the coinciding chapter of Chronicles, regularly fill up this omission; and we may add, that St. Jerome expressly asserts, that they are to be understood. Houbigant, however, does not see any such necessity. He translates the verse thus: But on the same day David gave this command, Whoever is about to kill a Jebusite, let him rush with a dagger upon the lame and the blind, who hate the soul of David: therefore came this proverb, the blind and the lame shall not enter the house. He renders the word zenur, a dagger, with the LXX, and herein agrees with Dr. Chandler; and he thinks that David calls the Jebusites the lame and the blind in contempt. Pfeiffer, in his Dubia Vexata, gives us the following interpretation of the text, 2 Samuel 5:6. "And the king and his men went to Jerusalem; (undertook an expedition against the Jebusites, who possessed that land) but they said to David, Thou shalt not come in hither unless thou shalt first remove these lame and these blind (pointed at, as it were, with the finger, by way of reproach; as much as to say, it is impossible for David to come in hither; for, as he cannot remove the blind and the lame from their station, we may be secure for the rest). 2 Samuel 5:7. But David took the fortress of Zion, which otherwise is called the city of David. 2 Samuel 5:8. And David said on that day, (having heard the taunt of the Jebusites,) Whoever shall smite the Jebusites, and shall reach to the canals of the city, and at the same time shall smite those lame and blind, (placed there by way of reproach,) hateful to David, because of that reproach; he shall be chief: (as it is supplied, 1 Chronicles 11:6.) Therefore they say (proverbially) the blind and the lame must not enter this house, the proverb being taken from those blind and lame who were besieged and were afterwards killed, never to return to their home." Dr. Delaney is of opinion, that the 115th Psalm was written by David as a triumphal song of thanksgiving for this victory.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:8". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/2-samuel-5.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Whosoever getteth up to the gutter, i.e. whosoever scaleth the fort, or getteth up to the top of it, where the gutter was.

And the lame and the blind, or even, or especially (for the Hebrew particle vau signifies both ways) the lame and the blind; i.e. those of them who are set to defend that place; who, as they pretend, should be only the lame and the blind. Others understand it of their idols or images. But they could not properly be said to be smitten, i. e. killed; as that word is used here, and elsewhere.

That are hated of David’s soul: this belongs to the Jebusite, and the lame and the blind; and it is explained in 2 Samuel 5:6.

He shall be chief and captain: these words are fitly supplied out of 1 Chronicles 11:6, where they are expressed; and they must needs be understood to make the sense complete. And such ellipses or defects of a part of the sentence are usual in promises, and oaths, and conditional offers, such as this was.

Wherefore they said, The blind and the lame shall not come into the house, i.e. whence it became a proverb, or a common saying, used by David and others upon this occasion. Or otherwise, The blind and the lame Jebusites were set to keep the house, i.e. the fort of Zion; and to keep others from coming into it; but now they are shut out of it, and none of them, to wit, either,

1. Of the Jebusites; or,

2. Of blind and lame persons, shall be admitted to come into it again; which David might resolve, and ordain, to keep up the memory of this great exploit, and of the insolent carriage of the Jebusites, and their unhappy success. Or, The blind and the lame shall not come into my house, to wit, into the king’s palace. And although this might be a general rule and decree of David’s, yet he might dispense with it in some special cases, as in that of Mephibosheth. But it is not necessary that this should be a proverb; for the words may be thus rendered, as it is in the margin of our Bible, Because they had said, even the blind and the lame, He (i. e. David) shall not come into the house; or, Because they (i. e. the Jebusites) had said, The blind and the lame shall hinder him; (which words are easily supplied out of 2 Samuel 5:6, where having spoken of this more largely, it was sufficient here to mention the most emphatical words, as is usual in such cases;) he shall not come into the house, or hither, as they say, 2 Samuel 5:6. i. e. into the fort; for the word house is used very largely and generally in the Hebrew language, for any place, as Jude 16:21.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:8". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-samuel-5.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

8.Getteth up to the gutter — This the Septuagint renders, Let him put to the sword. Similarly the Syriac and Arabic. The whole verse is obscure, and appears to be an abridged and broken transcription from a fuller document. Our translators have attempted to emend the passage by comparison with its parallel in 1 Chronicles 11:6. The word צנור, here rendered gutter, is rendered water-spout in Psalms 42:7. Gesenius and Keil render it cataract. According to Furst, it means a hollow passage, a water-conduit. Adopting the last signification, we refer it to the deep hollow beneath the citadel and translate thus: Every one smiting a Jebusite, let him thrust ( him) into the gulf, (beneath,) both the lame and the blind, (who) hated the soul of David. The Masoretic pointing is of insufficient authority to lead us to adopt the keri שׂנואי; the kethib should be pointed and read שׂנאו — the kal preterit. Ewald translates the passage metrically, thus:

Whoso shall conquer the Jebusite,

Let him hurl down from the cliff

The lame and the blind together,

Hated of David’s soul.

To this order David also added the offer recorded in 1 Chronicles 11:6: Whosoever smiteth the Jebusites first shall be chief and captain; and other things he doubtless said on that day which have not been recorded.

Wherefore they said — Therefore, that is, from this circumstance the following proverb arose.

The blind and the lame shall not come into the house — The spirit and meaning of the proverb is, Those who are repulsive and hateful to us we shall not allow to enter our dwellings; a proverb characteristic of Jewish antipathy and intolerance towards persons of another nation and another religion.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:8". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-samuel-5.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

2 Samuel 5:8. David said on that day — When the assault was made; Whosoever getteth up into the gutter — That is, whosoever scaleth the fort, or getteth up to the top of it, where the gutter was. Or, as some understand it, cuts off their pipes of water, or their cisterns into which the water fell. Dr. Kennicott observes that “the Hebrew, צנור, zenur, gutter, occurs but once more in the Bible, and does not seem commonly understood in this place. The English version calls it, the gutter; the Vulgate, fistulas, pipes; Vatablus, canales; Junius and Tremellius, emissarium, a common sewer; Poole, tubus aquæ, a pipe for water; and Bochart, alveus, a bed or channel of a river. Most interpreters agree in making the word signify something hollow, and in applying it to water.” It may mean, he thinks, “a subterraneous passage, or great hollow, through which men could pass and repass for water. That this zenur, in the text, was such an under-ground passage, might be strongly presumed from the text itself; but it is proved to have been so by Josephus. For, speaking of this very transaction, he says, ‘The citadel being as yet in the possession of the enemy, the king promised that he would make any one general of all his forces who should ascend into the citadel, δια υποκειμενων φαραγγων, through the subterraneous cavities.’ Here then we have subterraneous cavities most remarkably answering to zenur, and putting this interpretation upon a very solid footing.” Kenn. Dissert., vol. 1. p. 42. And the lame and the blind, that are hated of David’s soul — This, some think, plainly shows, that by the lame and the blind must be meant the idols of the Jebusites; because David certainly abhorred idolatry, but could never detest men for mere unblameable infirmities. But two things may be said in answer to this: 1st, That the lame and the blind Jebusites had probably themselves insulted David, and blasphemed God, and David might hate them in the same sense in which he often speaks of hating the wicked in his Psalms; that is, he might hate their ways, their dispositions, and actions. But, 2d, The original words may, and certainly should be rendered, as they are by the Seventy, who hate David’s soul. He shall be chief and captain — These words are not in the Hebrew here, but are fifty supplied from 1 Chronicles 11:6, where they are expressed. Wherefore they said — That is, it became a proverb, or common saying, used by David and others: The blind and the lame shall not come into the house — Or, into this house; that is, into the fort of Zion. The blind and lame Jebusites were set to keep that fort, and to keep others from coming into it; but now they themselves are shut out of it, and none of them was to be admitted to come into it again; which David might resolve to ordain, to keep up the memory of this great exploit, and of the insolent carriage of the Jebusites, and their unhappy success. Or, the blind and the lame shall not come into my house; namely, into the king’s palace; which, though a general rule and decree of David, yet might be dispensed with in some special cases, as in that of Mephibosheth. But it is not necessary to understand this as a proverb; for the words may be rendered, as they are in the margin of our Bibles, Because they had said, Even the blind and the lame, he (that is, David) shall not come into the house; or, because they (the Jebusites) had said, The blind and the lame shall hinder him. They who understand, by the blind and the lame, the idols of the Jebusites, consider this clause as meaning, that from this time it became a proverb, Let not the blind and lame come into the house; that is, do not trust in idols, who have eyes and see not, &c.; and who are not able to do more for you than the lame and the blind.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:8". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/2-samuel-5.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Gutters. Hebrew Tsinnor, "through (Nodius) the subterraneous passage," (leading to the tops of the houses.) (Hugo of Vienna) --- Thus Babylon was taken by Cyrus, who passed through the channel of the Euphrates, the waters of which he had let out; though the inhabitants had derided his attempt to take the city by siege, as the men of Jebus do here. Polybius says, "Rabatamana, a city of Arabia, could not be taken, till one of the prisoners shewed the besiegers a subterraneous passage, (Greek: uponomon) through which the besieged came down for water." Of the same nature were the gutters here spoken of. (Kennicott) --- "The king promised to give the command of the army to the man who would pass through the cavities (Greek: pharaggon) below, and take the citadel." (Josephus) --- This reward is expressly mentioned in 1 Paralipomenon xi. 6, with the person who obtained it; (St. Jerome, Trad.) and it seems, after David, this ought to be inserted, "shall be the head and captain. And Joab, the son of Sarvia, went up first, and was made the general." (Haydock) ---Hatred. Hebrew, "that are hated by David's soul." Cajetan supposes that the Jebusites in the citadel, are thus distinguished from those who dwelt peaceably in the lower town, with the Israelites. (Calmet) --- Proverb. Protestants insert, "He shall be head and captain. Wherefore they said, the blind....into the house." What is translated temple, may denote also, "the house" of David, or "the place" where this provocation had been given. (Haydock) --- Idols shall never be adored in the true Church. (Worthington) --- Some think that the blind and the lame were excluded from the temple, or from David's palace. But we find that they had free access to the temple; (Matthew xxi. 14., and Acts iii. 2.) and Miphiboseth ate at David's table, though he was lame. If the Jebusites be designated, they were already excluded from the temple, like other infidels of Chanaan. (Calmet) --- Josephus ([Antiquities?] vii. 3.) insinuates, that "David drove them from Jerusalem," though we read of Areuna residing there, chap. xxiv.16. But he might be a proselyte before, and not dwell in the fort. The expression seems however to be proverbial, to signify any very difficult enterprize, which proves successful, and contrary to expectation. (Haydock) --- The Jebusites were thus derided (Sanctius) in their turn. (Tirinus) --- Whether Joab took this strong place by a subterraneous passage, (Haydock) or scaled the walls, and so got to the top, whence the water falls, as from a gutter; (Calmet) it is certain that he displayed the utmost valour, and thus obtained the confirmation of his authority, which David would perhaps have willingly taken from him, (Salien) if another had offered himself, and performed this hazardous enterprize. (Haydock) --- He made a fair offer to all Israel, as they probably expected. (Kennicott)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:8". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/2-samuel-5.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

to the gutter = by (or through) the zinnor, a rock-cut passage from the lower Gihon or En-Rogel (now the Virgin"s Fount on east of Ophel), leading up into the city and supplying water. Discovered by Sir Charles Warren. Compare note on Nehemiah 2:13, &c.

soul. Hebrew. nephesh. App-13.

he shall be chief and captain. These words are supplied from 1 Chronicles 11:6, which tells that Joab got up the zinnor first. Probably revealed to him (or to David) by Araunah, who (though a Jebusite) was not slain, but is found, later on, owning property quite near (2 Samuel 24:16). Josephus says Araunah was a friend of David"s.

Wherefore = Because.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:8". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-samuel-5.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And David said on that day, Whosoever getteth up to the gutter, and smiteth the Jebusites, and the lame and the blind, that are hated of David's soul, he shall be chief and captain. Wherefore they said, The blind and the lame shall not come into the house.

Whosoever getteth up to the gutter, and smiteth the Jebusites [ kaal (Hebrew #3605) makeeh (Hebrew #5221) Y

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:8". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/2-samuel-5.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(8) Getteth up to the gutter.—The sense of this passage is obscure, partly from the difficulty of the Hebrew construction, partly from the uncertainty of the meaning of the word translated gutter. This word occurs elsewhere only in Psalms 42:7, where it is translated waterspouts. The ancient versions differ in their interpretations, but the most probable sense is watercourses, such as were connected with the precipices around Mount Zion. The two clauses also are unnecessarily transposed in our version, and the word getteth, by a very slight change in the Masoretic vowels, becomes cast or hurl. The whole clause will then read, “Whosoever smites the Jebusites, let him hurl into the watercourses (i.e., down the precipice) the lame and the blind.” David thus applies to all the Jebusites the expression they had just used of those who would suffice to resist his attack. The clause “that are hated of David’s soul,” shows that in this siege no quarter was to be given; the Jebusites were under the old ban resting upon all the Canaanites, and were to be destroyed. The English version inserts the clause, “he shall be chief and captain,” which is not in the original, and is here obscure. In 1 Chronicles 11:6, however, the same statement is made more fully and is important: “David said, Whosoever smiteth the Jebusites first shall be chief and captain. So Joab the son of Zeruiah went first up and was chief.” It thus appears that David promised the command of his army to the man who should successfully lead the forlorn hope; Joab did this, and won the place in the armies of all Israel which he had hitherto filled in that of Judah. This fact helps to explain the sense of obligation and restraint which David afterwards felt towards Joab.

Wherefore they said.—Rather, they say. This became a proverbial expression: no intercourse is to be had with such people as the Jebusites, here again called “the blind and the lame.”

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:8". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-samuel-5.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And David said on that day, Whosoever getteth up to the gutter, and smiteth the Jebusites, and the lame and the blind, that are hated of David's soul, he shall be chief and captain. Wherefore they said, The blind and the lame shall not come into the house.
Whosoever
Joshua 15:16,17; 1 Samuel 17:25
he shall be
1 Chronicles 11:6-9
Wherefore, etc
or, Because they had said, even the blind and the lame, he shall not come into the house.
Reciprocal: Joshua 18:28 - Jebusi;  2 Samuel 5:6 - which spake;  2 Samuel 24:16 - the Jebusite;  Joel 2:7 - climb

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:8". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-samuel-5.html.