corner graphic   Hi,    
ver. 2.0.19.10.13
Finding the new version too difficult to understand? Go to classic.studylight.org/

Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Acts 2:33

"Therefore having been exalted to the right hand of God, and having received from the Father the promise of the Holy Spirit, He has poured forth this which you both see and hear.

Adam Clarke Commentary

By the right hand of God exalted - Raised by omnipotence to the highest dignity in the realms of glory, to sit at the right hand of God, and administer the laws of both worlds.

The promise of the Holy Ghost - This was the promise that he had made to them a little before he suffered, as may be seen in John 14:16, etc., John 16:7, etc., and after he had risen from the dead. Luke 24:49, and which as the apostle says was now shed forth.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Acts 2:33". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/acts-2.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Therefore, being by the right hand - The right hand among the Hebrews was often used to denote “power”; and the expression here means, not that he was exalted to the right hand of God. but by his power. He was raised from the dead by his power, and borne to heaven, triumphant over all his enemies. The use of the word “right hand” to denote “power” is common in the Scriptures: Job 40:14, “Thine own right hand can save thee”; Psalm 17:7, “Thou savest by thy right hand them that trust in thee”; Psalm 18:35; Psalm 20:6; Psalm 21:8; Psalm 44:3; Psalm 60:5, etc.

Exalted - Constituted King and Messiah in heaven. Raised up from his condition of humiliation to the glory which he had with the Father before the world was, John 17:5.

And having received … - The Holy Spirit was promised to the disciples before his death, John 14:26; John 15:26; John 16:13-15. It was expressly declared:

(1)That the Holy Spirit would not be given except the Lord Jesus should return to heaven John 16:7; and,

(2)That this gift was in the power of the Father, and that he would send him, John 14:26; John 15:26. This promise was now fulfilled, and those who witnessed the extraordinary scene before them could not doubt that it was the effect of divine power.

Hath shed forth this … - This power of speaking different languages and declaring the truth of the gospel. In this way Peter accounts for the remarkable events before them. What had occurred could not be produced by new wine, Acts 2:15. It was expressly foretold, Acts 2:16-21. It was predicted that Jesus would rise, Acts 2:22-31. The apostles were witnesses that he had risen, and that he had promised that the Holy Spirit would descend; and the fulfillment of this promise was a rational way of accounting for the scene before them. It was unanswerable; and the effect on those who witnessed it was such as might be expected.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Acts 2:33". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/acts-2.html. 1870.

William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament

33. “Therefore, exalted at the right hand of God, having received the promise of the Holy Ghost with the Father, he has poured out this which you see and hear.” You see Peter’s logic. The discussion of the Holy Ghost filling the disciples is demonstrative proof that Christ has satisfied the Father with His atonement, actually been received and ratified in heaven, crowned at the right hand of God Mediatorial King, received the Holy Ghost and sent Him down His own Revelator and Successor whom He had promised to send down.

THE AWFUL INDICTMENT

Now the illiterate fisherman faces the multitude, boldly arraigns hierarchs and politarchs for the awful crime of murdering the Son of God. The mighty logic of the Holy Ghost sweeps away all the human and Satanic refuges of lies.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Godbey, William. "Commentary on Acts 2:33". "William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ges/acts-2.html.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

Being therefore by the right hand of God exalted, and having received of the Father the promise of the Holy Spirit, he hath poured forth this which ye see and hear.

By the right hand of God ... Christ had indeed appeared alive after his death and burial, and the apostles had seen him ascend into heaven. As so often affirmed in Scripture, Jesus was exalted at the right hand of the Majesty on High, and that exaltation was the fulfillment of God's oath that a descendant of David would sit upon his throne in perpetuity.

He hath poured forth this ... Despite the fact of his being in heaven, Jesus was still concerned with earth and the men dwelling upon it. He had promised the apostles that "another Comforter" would be given unto them; and here Peter affirmed that the baptism of the apostles in the Holy Spirit, as audibly and visually evidenced by the miraculous demonstration somewhat earlier, had indeed come to pass as Jesus promised. "Christ's present impartation of the Spirit to the apostles, attended as it was by sensible signs, was a further open vindication of the claim that he was the exalted Messiah."[36] However, before leaving the subject, Peter would offer another proof.

ENDNOTE:

[36] F. F. Bruce, op. cit., p. 72.


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Acts 2:33". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/acts-2.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Therefore being by the right hand of God exalted,.... After his resurrection he ascended to heaven, and was exalted in human nature; "to the right hand of God", as the Ethiopic version; and the Arabic version used by De Dieu read; an honour that never was conferred on any creature, angels or men, besides: or he was exalted and raised to the high honour and dignity of a Prince and Saviour, of Lord, Head, and King, so as to have a name, dominion, and authority over all, by the mighty power of God, which is sometimes called his right hand; see Psalm 118:15.

and having received of the Father the promise of the Holy Ghost; which the Father had promised to pour forth in the last days, Isaiah 44:3 and which Christ had promised to send from the Father, John 14:16 and which, upon his ascension and exaltation, he received as Mediator from him; see Psalm 68:18 compared with Ephesians 4:8.

he hath shed forth this; this Holy Spirit, or promised Spirit, these gifts of his; and so the Syriac version renders it, "he hath shed forth this gift"; which expresses both the plenty and abundance of the gifts bestowed, and the liberality of Christ in the donation of them: it is added,

which ye now see and hear; meaning the cloven tongues, as of fire, which they saw sitting on the disciples, and the various languages which they heard them speak. The Alexandrian copy, the Vulgate Latin and Ethiopic versions, leave out the word "now": and the Syriac, in the room of it, reads, "behold".


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Acts 2:33". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/acts-2.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Therefore being by the y right hand of God exalted, and having received of the Father the promise of the Holy Ghost, he hath shed forth this, which ye now see and hear.

(y) Might and power of God.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Acts 2:33". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/acts-2.html. 1599-1645.

People's New Testament

He hath shed forth this, which ye now see and hear. The supernatural marvels of this wonderful day were the proof of Christ's exaltation. He had {shed} them forth.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on Acts 2:33". "People's New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/acts-2.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

By the right hand of God (τηι δεχιαι του τεουtēi dexiāi tou theou). This translation makes it the instrumental case. The margin has it “at” instead of “by,” that is the locative case. And it will make sense in the true dative case, “to the right hand of God.” These three cases came to have the same form in Greek. Romans 8:24 furnishes another illustration of like ambiguity (τηι ελπιδιtēi elpidi), saved by hope, in hope, or for hope. Usually it is quite easy to tell the case when the form is identical.

Exalted (υπσωτειςhupsōtheis). First aorist passive participle of υπσοωhupsoō to lift up. Here both the literal and tropical sense occurs. Cf. John 12:32.

The promise of the Holy Spirit (την επαγγελιαν του πνευματος του αγιουtēn epaggelian tou pneumatos tou hagiou). The promise mentioned in Acts 1:4 and now come true, consisting in the Holy Spirit “from the Father” (παρα του πατροςpara tou patros), sent by the Father and by the Son (John 15:26; John 16:7). See also Galatians 3:14.

He hath poured forth (εχεχεενexecheen). Aorist active indicative of εκχεωekcheō the verb used by Joel and quoted by Peter already in Acts 2:17, Acts 2:18. Jesus has fulfilled his promise.

This which ye see and hear (τουτο ο υμεις και βλεπετε και ακουετεtouto ho humeis kai blepete kai akouete). This includes the sound like the rushing wind, the tongues like fire on each of them, the different languages spoken by the 120. “The proof was before their eyes in this new energy from heaven” (Furneaux), a culminating demonstration that Jesus was the Messiah.


Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Acts 2:33". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/acts-2.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Therefore being by the right hand of God exalted, and having received of the Father the promise of the Holy Ghost, he hath shed forth this, which ye now see and hear.

Being exalted by the right hand of God — By the right hand; that is, the mighty power of God. Our Lord was exalted at his ascension to God's right hand in heaven.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Acts 2:33". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/acts-2.html. 1765.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Shed forth this; the spiritual influence which had awakened their wonder.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Acts 2:33". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/acts-2.html. 1878.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

33.He being therefore exalted by the right hand of God The right hand is taken in this place for the hand or power, in like sort as it is taken everywhere in the Scripture. For this is his drift, to declare that it was a wonderful work of God, in that he had exalted his Christ (whom men thought to be quite destroyed by death) unto so great glory.

The promise of the Spirit for the Spirit which was promised. For he had oftentimes before promised the Spirit to his apostles. Therefore Peter doth signify, that Christ had obtained power of God the Father to fulfill the same. And he maketh mention of the promise in plain words, to the end the Jews may know that this came not to pass suddenly, but that the words of the prophet were now verified, which went long time before the thing itself.

Furthermore, whereas it is said that he obtained it of the Father, it is to be applied to the person of the Mediator. For both these are truly said, that Christ sent the Spirit from himself and from the Father. He sent him from himself, because he is eternal God; from the Father, because in as much as he is man, he receiveth that of the Father which he giveth us. And Peter speaketh wisely according to the capacity of the ignorant, lest any man should move a question out of season concerning the power of Christ. And surely forasmuch as it is the office of Christ to direct us unto his Father, this is a most apt form of speaking for the use of godliness, that Christ being placed, as it were, in the midst between God and us, doth deliver unto us with his own hand those gifts which he hath received at the hands of his Father. Furthermore, we must note this order that he saith, that the Spirit was sent by Christ after that he was exalted. This agreeth with those sentences:

“The Spirit was not yet given,
because Christ was not yet glorified,”
(
John 7:39.)

And again,

“Unless I go hence, the Spirit will not come,”
(
John 16:7.)

Not because the Spirit began then first to be given, wherewith the holy fathers were endued since the beginning of the world; but because God did defer this more plentiful abundance of grace, until such time as he had placed Christ in his princely seat; which is signified by this word poured out, as we saw a little before. For by this means the force and fruit of Christ his death and resurrection is sealed; and we do also thereby know, that we have lost nothing by Christ his departing out of the world; because, though he be absent in body, yet is he present with us after a better sort, to wit, by the grace of his Holy Spirit.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Acts 2:33". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/acts-2.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

33 Therefore being by the right hand of God exalted, and having received of the Father the promise of the Holy Ghost, he hath shed forth this, which ye now see and hear.

Ver. 33. Exalted] {See Trapp on "Acts 2:27"}


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Acts 2:33". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/acts-2.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Acts 2:33. He hath shed forth this, which ye now see and hear. It is said, John 7:39 that the Holy Ghost was not yet given, because Jesus was not yet glorified. See the note on that verse. The Spirit, in his extraordinary and superabundant influences, was reserved as the great donative after Christ's triumph over principalities and powers. When he was ascended up on high, he sent down the greatest gift that ever was bestowed upon mankind, except himself. By this Christ discovered the greatness of his purchase, the height of his glory, the exercise of his power, the certainty of his resurrection and ascension, and the care he took of his church: for in what could he illustrate his character more, thanby letting them see that he made good his last promise, of sending them another Comforter, who should be with them in all their undertakings, to direct them in their doubts, and to plead their cause against all opposition? What still enhanced this gift was, that it was not to continue with them only for a short time, but to abide with them and all his faithful saints for ever. It was to remain with them as a pledge of his love, as a testimony of his truth, as an earnest of his favour now, and of the future inheritance of all the faithful in heaven. See Ephesians 4:8; Ephesians 4:32.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Acts 2:33". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/acts-2.html. 1801-1803.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

33.] Peter now comes to the Ascension—the exaltation of Jesus to be, in the fullest sense, Lord and Christ.

τῇ δεξιᾷ] by the right hand, not ‘to the right hand.’ The great end of this speech is to shew forth (see above) the GOD OF ISRAEL as the doer of all these things. However well the sense ‘to’ might seem to agree with the ἐκ δεξιῶν of Acts 2:34, we must not set aside a very suitable sense, nor violate syntax (for the construction is entirely unexampled in Hellenistic as well as prose classical Greek) in order to suit an apparent adaptation. The reference is carried on by the word δεξιά, though it be not in exactly the same position in the two cases. And the ἀνέβη εἰς τοὺς οὐρ. of Acts 2:34 prepares the way for the ἐκ δεξιῶν following without any harshness.

On the poetic dative after verbs of approach, see Musgr., Phœnissæ, 310 (303, Matth.), and Hermann, Antig. 234. See also ch. Acts 5:31, and Winer (who defends the construction), edn. 6, § 31. 5. Wordsw. denies that the δεξιὰ θεοῦ is ever specified in the N. T. as the instrument by which He works. But he has omitted to state that this and the similarly ambiguous place, ch. Acts 5:31, are the only real instances of the expression being used, all the rest being local, ἐκ δεξιῶν or ἐν δεξιᾷ: so that his dictum goes for nothing. And in the LXX the use of God’s right hand as the instrument is very frequent: cf. Exodus 15:6; Exodus 15:12; Ps. 17:36; 59:5 (where the dat. is used as here), and about 20 other places; Isaiah 48:13; Isaiah 63:12, &c. After this, the objection, when applied to a speech so full of O. T. spirit and diction as this, would, even if valid as regards the N. T., be irrelevant.

ἐπαγγελίαν] Christ is said to have received from the Father the promise above cited from Joel, which is spoken of His days. This, and not of course the declarations made by Himself to the same effect, is here referred to, though doubtless those were in Peter’s mind. The very word, ἐξέχεεν, refers to ἐκχεῶ above, Acts 2:17.

τοῦτο, ‘this influence,’ this merely; leaving to his hearers the inference, that this, which they saw and heard, must be none other than the effusion of the Spirit.

βλέπετε need not imply, as Dr. Burton thinks, that “there was some visible appearance, which the people saw as well as the apostles:”—very much of the effect of the descent of the Spirit would be visible,—the enthusiasm and gestures of the speakers, for instance; not, however, the tongues of flame,—for then none could have spoken as in Acts 2:13.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Acts 2:33". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/acts-2.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Acts 2:33. οὖν] namely, in consequence of the resurrection, with which the exaltation is necessarily connected.

τῇ δεξιᾷ τοῦ θεοῦ] by the right hand, i.e. by the power of God, v. 31; Isaiah 63:12. Comp. Vulgate, Luther, Castalio, Beza, Bengel, also Zeller, p. 502, and others. The rendering: to the right hand of God, however much it might be recommended as regards sense by Acts 2:34, is to be rejected, seeing that the construction of simple verbs of motion with the dative of the goal aimed at, instead of with πρός or εἰς, belongs in classical Greek only to the poets (see the passages from Homer in Nägelsb. p. 12, ed. 3, and, besides, Erfurdt, ad Antig. 234; Bernhardy, p. 95; Fritzsche, Conject. I. p. 42, the latter seeking to defend the use as legitimate), and occurs, indeed, in late writers(132) (see Winer, p. 201 f.[E. T. 268 f.]), but is without any certain example in the N. T., often as there would have been occasion for it; for Acts 21:16 admits of another explanation, and Revelation 2:16 is not at all a case in point. In the passage of the LXX. Judges 11:18, deemed certain by Fritzsche, τῇ γῇ ΄ωάβ (if the reading is correct) is to be connected, not with ἦλθεν, but as appropriating dative with ἀπὸ ἀνατολῶν ἡλίου. Concerning κύρῳ ἰέναι, Xen. Anab. i. 2. 26, see Bornemann, ed. Lips. The objection, that by the right hand of God is here inappropriate (de Wette and others), is not tenable. There is something triumphant in the element emphatically prefixed, which is correlative to ἀνέστησεν θεός (Acts 2:32); God’s work of power was, as the resurrection, so also the exaltation. Comp. Philippians 2:9. A Hebraism, or an incorrect translation of לְמִינִי (Bleek in the Stud. u. Krit. 1832, p. 1038; de Wette; Weiss, Petr. Lehrbegr. p. 205), has been unnecessarily and arbitrarily assumed.

τήν τε ἐπαγγ. τ. ἁγ. πν. λαβ. παρὰ τ. πατρ.] contains that which followed upon the ὑψωθείς, and hence is not to be explained with Kuinoel and others: “after He had received the promise of the Holy Spirit from the Father;” but: “after He had received the (in the O. T.) promised (Acts 1:4) Holy Spirit from His Father. See on Luke 24:49.

τοῦτο is either, with Vulgate, Erasmus, Beza, Kuinoel, and others, to be referred to the πνεῦμα ἅγιον, so that the corresponds to the explanatory id quod (Kühner, § 802. 2), or—which, on account of the annexed to τοῦτο, is more natural and more suitable to the miraculous character—it is, with Luther, Calvin, and others, to be taken as an independent neuter: He poured forth (just now) this, what ye (in effectu) see and hear (in the conduct and speech of those assembled). Accordingly, Peter leaves it to his hearers, after what had previously been remarked ( τήν τε ἐπαγγ.… πατρός), themselves to infer that what was poured out was nothing else than just the πνεῦμα ἅγιον.(133)

The idea that the exalted Jesus in heaven receives from His Father and pours forth the Holy Spirit, is founded on such instructions of Christ as John 15:26; John 16:7. Comp. on Acts 1:4.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Acts 2:33". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/acts-2.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Acts 2:33. τῇ δεξιᾷ) So also in ch. Acts 5:31, “Him hath God exalted with His right hand to be a Prince and a Saviour.” The Hebrew לימין is rendered by the LXX. usually ἐκ δεξιῶν; and so also in Psalms 110:1, the passage to which Peter refers, and yet uses the expression τῇ δεξιᾷ, which is found once in the LXX., Isaiah 63:12. Christ was exalted by the right hand of GOD to the right hand of God.— οὖν, therefore) The resurrection of Christ having been established, His ascension cannot be called in question. For this reason it is first asserted by itself, and next is also established from the 110th Psalm.— ὑψωθεὶς, having been exalted) The exaltation strictly took place at His ascension.— ἐξέχεε, He poured out) See Acts 2:17.— τοῦτο νῦν) The more recent MSS. of the Latin Vulg. have “hunc, quem,” instead of “hoc quod nunc.” They understand πνεῦμα (Neut.), “spiritum” (Masc). The neuter gender in Greek is expressed by the masculine in Latin. Moreover the phrase is absolute, this ( τοῦτο), elegantly denoting the newness (the unprecedented character) of this unspeakable gift.(16) Irenæu(17) has νῦν, now, which has been omitted by some.(18)βλέπετε καὶ ἁκόυετε, ye see and hear) Ye have testimonies to the facts which are not to be ‘mocked’ at (Acts 2:13).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Acts 2:33". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/acts-2.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

By the right hand of God, that is, by the power of God spoken after the manner of men, the right hand being that we commonly do any thing with. Some read at the right hand of God; and then the apostle preaches Christ’s ascension too, and his being justified by God, though he had been condemned by men.

Having received of the Father the promise of the Holy Ghost: Psalms 68:18

Which ye now see, in the fiery cloven tongues; and hear, in the divers languages which are spoken.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Acts 2:33". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/acts-2.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

The promise; John 14:26; John 15:26; John 16:7; John 16:13-15.

This; their power to speak in various languages.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Acts 2:33". "Family Bible New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/acts-2.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

33. ὑψωθείς, exalted (into heaven), for the Apostles are witnesses not only of the Resurrection but of the Ascension also.

τήν τε ἐπαγγελίαν πν. τ. ἁγ. Called in Acts 1:4 ἡ ἐπαγγελία τοῦ πατρός. The promise was made by the Father, and the Holy Ghost was the gift promised. Christ’s words were, ‘I will pray the Father, and He shall give you another Comforter’ (John 14:16). What was at first an ἐπαγγελία has now attained its fulfilment, so that λαβών implies the complete fruition of all that was promised.

ἐξέχεεν, He hath poured forth. Thus fulfilling the promise in the prophecy quoted Acts 2:17 : ἐκχεῶ ἀπὸ τοῦ πνέυματός μου.

βλέπετε καὶ ἀκούετε. It would seem from this that the appearance, like as of fire, which rested upon each of them, remained visible for some time, thus making it evident how different this was from any meteoric flashes into which some have endeavoured to explain away the miracle which St Luke describes.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
"Commentary on Acts 2:33". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/acts-2.html. 1896.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

33. Therefore—As the result of the whole.

Exalted—A clear testimony to the ascension.

Shed forth this—So that we have here Peter’s second answer to the question, (Acts 2:12,) What meaneth this?—It is a manifestation sent down from the ascended Jesus Messiah. Peter now confirms the exalted Lordship of the ascended Jesus by further prophecy.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Acts 2:33". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/acts-2.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Peter next explained that it was Jesus, now at God"s right hand, who had poured forth the promised Holy Spirit from the Father ( John 14:16-17; John 14:26; John 15:26-27). The evidence of this was the tongues of fire and demonstration of tongues speaking that his audience saw and heard. The right hand of God figuratively repesents supreme power and authority, and reference to it sets up the quotation of Psalm 110:1 in the next verse.

Peter mentioned all three members of the Trinity in this verse.

"Throughout Acts , the presence of the Spirit is seen as the distinguishing mark of Christianity-it is what makes a person a Christian." [Note: Witherington, p140.]


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Acts 2:33". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/acts-2.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Acts 2:33. Therefore being by the right hand of God exalted. Render instead, Therefore being exalted to the right hand of God. The quotation from the prophecy of Psalms 16, which related in so strangely an accurate way Messiah’s calm, joyful confidence that death should have no abiding power over either flesh or soul, broke short off, it will be remembered, in the middle of the nth verse of the Psalm, with a general expression of joy in the presence of the Father. St. Peter now having spoken of his Master’s resurrection and of the literal fulfilment of the prophecy respecting death being powerless to hold Him, takes up as it were the interrupted thread in the Psalm, and proceeds to speak of the exaltation of Messiah at the right hand of God where the Psalm leaves the ‘Holy One’ enthroned.

And having received of the Father the promise of the Holy Ghost, he hath shed forth this, which ye now see and hear. From His mediatorial throne at the right hand of God, Christ poured out the Spirit, said St. Peter, on these, as ye now see, just as He promised His own when He was with them on earth (comp. John 14:16-17; John 15:26; John 16:7, and Acts 1:4).

On the question of the translation ‘to the right hand,’ this construction of a verb of motion with the dative τῇ δεξιῇ . . . . ύψωθςίς is found in classical writers only among the poets, though such a usage occurs in later writers. The undoubted connection with the concluding words of the great prophecy of Psalms 16 (see Ewald’s masterly paraphrase of the whole passage), leads us without hesitation to adopt this rendering in preference to the usual translation ‘by the right hand,’ with many of the best of the modern commentators, Neander, Olshausen, De Wette, Hackett, Wordsworth, etc.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Acts 2:33". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/acts-2.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Acts 2:33. οὖν: the Ascension is a necessary sequel to the Resurrection, cf. Weiss, Leben Jesu, iii., 409 ff. and in loco. Or the word may mark the result of the assured and manifold testimony to the Resurrection, to which the Apostle had just appealed: “Confirmata resurrectione Christi, ascensio non potest in dubium vocari,” Bengel.— τῇ δεξιᾷ τοῦ θεοῦ: best to take the words as an instrumental dative, so in Acts 5:31, with the majority of recent commentators. On grammatical grounds it would be difficult to justify the rendering “to the right hand” (although taken in connection with Acts 5:34 it would give very good sense), since such a combination of the dative alone is found only in the poets, and never in prose in classical Greek. The only other instances adduced, Acts 21:16 and Revelation 2:16, can be otherwise explained, cf. Winer-Moulton, xxxi., p. 268. On Judges 11:18 (LXX) quoted in support of the local rendering by Fritzsch, see Wendt’s full note in loco. The instrumental meaning follows naturally upon Acts 2:32—the Ascension, as the Resurrection, was the mighty deed of God, Philippians 2:9. There is therefore no occasion to regard the expression with De Wette as a Hebraism, see Wetstein, in loco.— ὑψωθείς, cf. especially John 12:32, and Westcott’s note on John 3:14. The word is frequently found in LXX. As Lightfoot points out, in our Lord Himself the divine law which He Himself had enunciated was fulfilled, ταπεινῶν ἑαυτὸν ὑψωθήσεται (Luke 14:11; Luke 18:14).— τήν τε ἐπαγγελίαν τοῦ ἁγίου πνεύματος κ. τ. λ., see above on Acts 1:4 (Galatians 3:14). The language of St. Peter is in agreement with, but yet independent of, that in St. John, whilst it calmly certifies the fulfilment of our Lord’s promise.— ἐξέχεε: “hath poured forth,” R.V. All previous English versions except Rhem. = A.V. The verb is used in the LXX in the prophecy cited above, Joel 2:28-29 (cf. also Zechariah 12:10), although it is not used in the Gospels of the outpouring of the Spirit.— τοῦτο: either the Holy Ghost, as the Vulgate takes it, or an independent neuter “this which ye see and hear,” i.e., in the bearing and speech of the assembled Apostles. St. Peter thus leads his hearers to infer that that which is poured out is by its effects nothing else than the Holy Ghost. It is noteworthy that just as Joel speaks of God, the Lord Jehovah, pouring out of His Spirit, so the same divine energy is here attributed by St. Peter to Jesus. See above on Acts 2:17.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Acts 2:33". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/acts-2.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

He hath poured forth this, which we see, and hear, by the effects, by the noise, as it were of thunder, by our speaking languages, &c. (Witham) --- It does not appear that the holy Spirit was visible to the multitude, whom St. Peter addressed. But they perceived sensible marks of his presence, in the great noise, which had called them together, and the divers tongues spoken by illiterate men, who had never studied. (Haydock)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Acts 2:33". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/acts-2.html. 1859.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

Acts 2:33 Being therefore by the right hand of God exalted, and having received of the Father the promise of the Holy Spirit, he hath poured forth this, which ye see and hear.

"BY THE RIGHT HAND OF GOD"-Comparing this verse with , we must conclude that when we see the expression "by the right hand of God", we could also say, "on David"s throne" or "on God"s throne". See Revelation 3:21; Hebrews 1:3.

"HAVING RECEIVED OF THE FATHER THE PROMISE OF THE HOLY SPIRIT"-Two views on this expression exist: (1) The promise of the Holy Spirit applies to the promise to send the Holy Spirit upon the apostles (Acts 1:4; John 14:26) (2) The promise applies to the promise spoken by the Holy Spirit through David, i.e. Acts 2:25-30.

"HE HATH POURED FORTH THIS, WHICH YE SEE AND HEAR"-"The glorified Jesus is responsible for what you have seen and heard this day...and what you"ve seen and heard is proof that He is glorified." (Reese p. 71)

Points to Note:

Thus far we find Peter presenting four lines of evidence to prove the resurrection: (1) The miracles of Jesus-should of told them that God was with Him (). (2) The O.T. clearly predicted the resurrection of a specific individual (Psalms 16:1-11). (3) The apostles had been eyewitnesses. (4) The events taking place on this day--Jesus" way of showing the crowd that He was indeed reigning on David"s throne.

Be impressed that God doesn"t expect these people to believe without any evidence. Notice that the apostles never use "purely emotional or subjective" arguments, like "Just ask God if this is true", or "pray that God would give you a sign", or "if you get a warm feeling in your heart--then you know that this is the truth".


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Acts 2:33". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/acts-2.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

being . . . exalted. Greek. hupsoo. See note on John 12:32.

of = from beside. Greek. para. App-104.

promise. See note on Acts 1:4.

the Holy Ghost = the Holy Spirit. App-101.

shed forth. Same as "pour out" in verses: Acts 17:18.

now. Omit.

see. Greek. blepo. App-133.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Acts 2:33". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/acts-2.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Therefore being by the right hand of God exalted, and having received of the Father the promise of the Holy Ghost, he hath shed forth this, which ye now see and hear.

Therefore being by the right hand of God exalted , [ tee (Greek #3588) dexia (Greek #1188)] - not 'to the right hand of God' (as Olshausen, DeWette, Hackett, Webster and Wilkinson, render the words, against good Greek usage), but "by the right hand of God" (as in our version, with the Vulgate, Luther, Calvin, Beza, Meyer, etc.) - that is, by a glorious forth-putting of divine power. This sense suits best with the whole scope of the argument, which was to prove that God had reversed and undone their treatment of Jesus-raising Him whom they killed, and exalting to supreme power and glory Him whom they had brought so low.

And having received of the Father the promise of the Holy Spirit - that is, the promised Spirit,

He hath shed forth this, which (in its effects) ye [now] see and hear. (The "now" is an addition to the genuine text.)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Acts 2:33". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/acts-2.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

He has been raised to the right side of God. See Philippians 2:6-11. He sits on a heavenly throne. What you now see and hear. These supernormal events are proof that Jesus is not king (Acts 2:30). He has "poured out" this gift.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Acts 2:33". "The Bible Study New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/acts-2.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(33) Therefore being by the right hand of God.—The Greek has the dative case without a preposition. The English version takes it, and probably is right in taking it, as the dative of the instrument, the image that underlies the phrase being that the Eternal King stretches forth His hand to raise Him who was in form His Servant to a place beside Him on His right hand; and, on the whole, this seems the best rendering. Not a few scholars, however, render the words “exalted to the right hand of God.”

Having received of the Father.—The words of St. Peter, obviously independent as they are of the Gospel of St. John, present a striking agreement with our Lord’s language as recorded by him (John 14:26; John 15:26). The promise throws us back upon these chapters, and also upon Acts 1:4.

Hath shed forth this.—Better, hath poured out. The verb had not been used in the Gospels of the promise of the Spirit, but is identical with that which was found in the Greek version of Joel’s prophecy, as cited in Acts 2:17, “I will pour out of My Spirit.”


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Acts 2:33". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/acts-2.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Therefore being by the right hand of God exalted, and having received of the Father the promise of the Holy Ghost, he hath shed forth this, which ye now see and hear.
by
5:31; Psalms 89:19,24; 118:16,22,23; Isaiah 52:13; 53:12; Matthew 28:18; Mark 16:19; John 17:5; Ephesians 1:20-23; Philippians 2:9-11; Hebrews 1:2-4; 10:12; 1 Peter 1:21; 3:22
having
1:4; Luke 24:49; John 7:38,39; 14:16,26; 15:26; 16:7-15
he
17,38,39; 10:45; Romans 5:5; Ephesians 4:8; Titus 3:6

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Acts 2:33". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/acts-2.html.

Lectionary Calendar
Sunday, October 13th, 2019
the Week of Proper 23 / Ordinary 28
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient contact form
Powered by Lightspeed Technology