Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Exodus 6:2

God spoke further to Moses and said to him, "I am the Lord ;
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Moses;   Revelation;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Canaan;   Moses;   Yahweh;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - God;   God, Name of;   God, Names of;   Kinsman-Redeemer;   Praise;   Proverbs, Theology of;   Zephaniah, Theology of;   CARM Theological Dictionary - Theophany;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Jehovah;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Genesis, the Book of;   Jehovah;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Exodus;   Exodus, Book of;   God of the Fathers;   Promise;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Enosh;   God;   Moses;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Genesis, Book of;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - God;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Moses;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Exodus, the Book of;   God;   God, Names of;   Law in the Old Testament;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Grace, Divine;   Names of God;   Sidra;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

I am the Lord - It should be, I am Jehovah, and without this the reason of what is said in the 3d verse is not sufficiently obvious.

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Exodus 6:2". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/exodus-6.html. 1832.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And God spake unto Moses, and said unto him, I am the Lord. Or Jehovah, the self-existent Being, the Being of beings, the everlasting I am, the unchangeable Jehovah, true, firm, and constant to his promises, ever to be believed, and always to be depended on.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Exodus 6:2". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/exodus-6.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

And God spake unto Moses — For his further encouragement, there was made to him an emphatic repetition of the promise (Exodus 3:20).

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Exodus 6:2". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/exodus-6.html. 1871-8.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

How sweet and precious is this declaration! Reader! do you know the Lord under this glorious character? It means everything that can carry with it self-existence, and self-sufficiency. See Isaiah 40:11-28; Revelation 22:13.

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Bibliographical Information
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Exodus 6:2". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/exodus-6.html. 1828.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And God spake unto Moses, and said unto him, I am the LORD:

l am Jehovah — The same with I am that I am, the fountain of being and blessedness, and infinite perfection. The patriarchs knew this name, but they did not know him in this matter by that which this name signifies. God would now be known by his name Jehovah, that is, 1. A God performing what he had promised, and so giving being to his promises2. A God perfecting what he had begun, and finishing his own work. In the history of the creation God is never called Jehovah, till the heavens and the earth were finished, Genesis 2:4. When the salvation of the saints is compleated in eternal life, then he will be known by his name Jehovah, Revelation 22:13, in the mean time they shall find him for their strength and support, El-shaddai, a God All-sufficient, a God that is enough.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Exodus 6:2". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/exodus-6.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Exodus 6:2 And God spake unto Moses, and said unto him, I [am] the LORD:

Ver. 2. I am Jehovah.] Aυταυτος (Scaliger’s (a) word); that do Press (b) (Gregory’s word); that have being of myself, give being to all things else, and in special to my promises, to "perform with my hand" what I have "spoken with my mouth"; [1 Kings 8:15] only God expects that men put his promises in suit by their prayers, as here, and burden him with them, as that martyr said.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Exodus 6:2". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/exodus-6.html. 1865-1868.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Exodus 6:2. I am the Lord — That is, Jehovah, on which word the emphasis is laid, and it is to be wished that it had been always preserved in this translation, and especially in such passages as this, the sense of which entirely depends on the word. It signifies the same with, I AM THAT I AM, the fountain of being and blessedness, and of infinite perfection. By my name Jehovah was I not known unto them — As it is certain that God declared himself to these patriarchs by the name Jehovah, as may be seen Genesis 15:6-7; Genesis 22:14; Genesis 22:16, some of the best and most accurate writers conclude that the latter part of this verse ought to be read interrogatively, thus, And by my name Jehovah was I not known unto them? The original words will well bear this translation, and it would entirely remove that apparent contradiction which is implied in our version. At the same time it would greatly improve the sense and force of the passage. But if we do not read it in this manner, we must not understand it of the name itself, but of the power and virtue which the name expresses. And then the meaning of the passage will be, that though God had revealed himself to the patriarchs as the El-shaddai, the Almighty, or All-sufficient, yet they did not live to see the accomplishment of his promises; and therefore, though they believed, yet they did not experimentally know that he was a God of unchangeable truth; nor had they experienced that all the powers of nature were in his hand, and that he could change them as he pleased, and even communicate the power of doing so to man. But it was to Moses that God first showed his power of making alterations in nature, or working miracles and prodigies. What makes this sense of the passage probable is, that the knowing of Jehovah is spoken of in this way, Exodus 7:5, And the Egyptians shall know that I am Jehovah, when I stretch forth my hand on Egypt. Thus, Henry observes, “The patriarchs knew this name, but they did know him in this matter by that which this name signifies.” God would now be known by his name Jehovah, that Isaiah, 1 st, A God performing what he had promised, and so giving being to his promises. 2d, A God perfecting what he had begun, and finishing his own work. In the history of the creation God is never called Jehovah till the heavens and the earth were finished, Genesis 2:4. When the salvation of the saints is completed in eternal life, then he will be known by his name Jehovah, Revelation 22:13; in the mean time they shall find him for their strength and support, El-shaddai, a God all-sufficient, a God that is enough.

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Exodus 6:2". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/exodus-6.html. 1857.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

God spake. Occurs only twice in Exodus: here, and 20. See notes on Exodus 3:7 with Exodus 6:10.

God. Hebrew. Elohim. App-4.

the LORD = Jehovah. Note the repetition five times in this revelation, verses: Exodus 6:2, Exodus 6:3, Exodus 6:6, Exodus 2:7, Exodus 2:8, and see App-10.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Exodus 6:2". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/exodus-6.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And God spake unto Moses, and said unto him, I am the LORD:

And God spoke unto Moses. For his further encouragement, there was made to him an emphatic repetition of the promise (Exodus 3:20).

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Exodus 6:2". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/exodus-6.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And God spake unto Moses, and said unto him, I am the LORD:
I am the Lord
or, Jehovah.
6,8; 14:18; 17:1; 20:2; Genesis 15:7; Isaiah 42:8; 43:11,15; 44:6; Jeremiah 9:24; Malachi 3:6; Acts 17:24,25
Reciprocal: Exodus 6:29 - I am the;  Exodus 12:12 - I am the Lord;  Leviticus 18:5 - I am the Lord;  Deuteronomy 28:58 - fear this glorious

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Exodus 6:2". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/exodus-6.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

2.And God spake. God pursues His address, that Moses may again uplift the fainting courage of the people. Moreover, He rebukes their distrust, by recalling the memory of His covenant; for if this had been duly impressed upon their minds, they would have been much more firm in their expectation of deliverance. He therefore shews that He has now advanced nothing new; since they had heard long ago from the Patriarchs that they were chosen by God as His peculiar people, and had almost imbibed from their mother’s breasts the doctrine of his adoption of them. Wherefore their stupidity is the more unpardonable, and more manifest, when they thus factiously complain of Moses, as if he had himself invented what he had promised them in the name of God. He also stings them by an implied comparison; Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob had eagerly embraced the promise given them, and had quietly, and perseveringly trusted in it; whilst they, who boasted of their descent from that holy stock, disdainfully rejected it, because its fulfillment did not immediately appear. And, in order to amplify their sin, he reasons from the less to the greater: since a fuller and clearer manifestation of it is presented to them than there had been to the fathers, it follows that they ought to have been more ready to believe it. Whence it is plain that their stupidity is inexcusable, since they will not receive God, when he is so familiarly presenting himself to them. Translators do not agree as to the epithet “Sadai.” Some derive it from the word שדד, shadad, and imagine that the final letter י, yod, is the double ד, daleth If we agree to this, it will mean the same as “the Destroyer;” or at any rate will signify the awful majesty of God. Others are rather of opinion that the root is שד, shad, which means “a teat.” To others it appears to be a compound word from the relative אשר, esher, or ש, and די, di, which in Hebrew means “ sufficiency. ” Thus he will be called “Sadai,” who abounds with all good things. It is indeed sure that they use this word in a good as well as a bad sense; for where Isaiah threatens that God will be the avenger of sins, he calls him “Sadai.” ( Isaiah 13:9.) So also in Job 23:16, “Sadai troubleth me.” In these and similar passages, the terrible power of God is unquestionably expressed; but when He promises to Abraham that He will be the God “Sadai,” He is engaging himself to be merciful and bounteous. Here again, where He says that He appeared to the Fathers as the God “Sadai,” He has not respect so much to His might in exercising judgment, as to His abundant and perfect loving-kindness; as though He had said, that He had manifested to Abraham and the other Patriarchs how great was His efficiency in preserving and defending His own people, and that they had known from experience how powerfully and effectually He cherishes, sustains, and aids them that are His. But although He declares what benefits He conferred upon them, He says that He was not known to them by His name “Jehovah;” signifying thus that He now more brightly manifested the glory of His divinity to their descendants. It would be tedious to recount the various opinions as to the name “Jehovah.” It is certainly a foul superstition of the Jews that they dare not speak, or write it, but substitute the name “Adonai;” nor do I any more approve of their teaching, who say that it is ineffable, because it is not written according to grammatical rule. Without controversy, it is derived from the word היה, hayah, or הוה, havah, and therefore it is rightly said by learned commentators to be the essential name of God, whereas others are, as it were, epithets. Since, then, nothing is more peculiar to God than eternity, He is called Jehovah, because He has existence from Himself, and sustains all things by His secret inspiration. Nor do I agree with the grammarians, who will not have it pronounced, because its inflection is irregular; because its etymology, of which all confess that God is the author, is more to me than an hundred rules. (72) Nor does God by “His name” in this passage mean syllables or letters, but the knowledge of His glory and majesty, which shone out more fully and more brightly in the redemption of His Church, than in the commencement of the covenant. For Abraham and the other Patriarchs were content with a smaller measure of light; whence it follows that the fault of their descendants would be less excusable, if their faith was not answerable to the increase of their grace. Meanwhile, Moses is awakened to activity whilst God is setting before him a magnificent and singular means of shewing forth His glory.

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Bibliographical Information
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Exodus 6:2". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/exodus-6.html. 1840-57.