Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 17:23

I in them and You in Me, that they may be perfected in unity, so that the world may know that You sent Me, and loved them, even as You have loved Me.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Church;   Fellowship;   God Continued...;   Holiness;   Jesus Continued;   Prayer;   Righteous;   Thompson Chain Reference - Ask;   Believers;   Christ;   Christ's;   Church;   Family;   Importunity;   Indwelling Christ;   Inseparable Christ;   Knowledge;   Knowledge-Ignorance;   Prayer;   Secret Prayer;   Temple, Spiritual;   United Prayer;   Unwise Prayers;   Wicked, the;   The Topic Concordance - Belief;   Declaration;   Giving and Gifts;   Glory;   Jesus Christ;   Knowledge;   Love;   Manifestation;   Sending and Those Sent;   Unity;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Divisions;   Love of God, the;   Perfection;   Prayer, Intercessory;   Union with Christ;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Kingdom of god;   Love;   Nation;   Prayer;   Priest;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Love;   Mediator, Mediation;   Spirituality;   Union with Christ;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Commentary;   Covenant;   Intercession of Christ;   Pre-Existence of Jesus Christ;   Predestination;   CARM Theological Dictionary - Hypostatic union;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Adoption;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Dew;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Children (Sons) of God;   John, the Gospel of;   Unity;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Children (Sons) of God;   Ephesians, Epistle to;   Holy Spirit;   John, Theology of;   Love, Lover, Lovely, Beloved;   Possession;   Prayer;   Trinity;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Character;   Church (2);   Comfort (2);   Communion (2);   Consecrate, Consecration (2);   Cosmopolitanism;   Death of Christ;   Dependence;   Devotion;   Example;   Force;   Glory (2);   Grace;   Heaven;   Hunger;   Ideas (Leading);   Immanence ;   Impotence;   Love (2);   Mansion ;   Monotheism;   Necessity;   Obedience (2);   Oneness;   Personality;   Power;   Prayer (2);   Presence (2);   Priest;   Righteous, Righteousness;   Son of God;   Teaching of Jesus;   Trinity (2);   Union;   Union with God;   Unity (2);   Morrish Bible Dictionary - 19 To Accomplish, Finish, Fulfil;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Beloved;   Body;   Mystery;   Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Perfect;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Ethics of Jesus;   Love;   Perfect;   Sons of God (New Testament);  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for November 13;   Every Day Light - Devotion for October 10;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

That the world may know - That the Jewish people first, and secondly the Gentiles, may acknowledge me as the true Messiah, and be saved unto life eternal.

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These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 17:23". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-17.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

May be made perfect in one - That their union may be complete. That there may be no jars, discords, or contentions. A machine is perfect or complete when it has all its parts and is in good order when there is no portion of it wanting. So the union of Christians, for which the Saviour prayed, would be complete or perfect if there were no controversies, no envyings, no contentions, and no heart-burnings and jealousies. It is worthy of remark here how entirely the union of his people occupied the mind of Jesus as he drew near to death. He saw the danger of strifes and contentions in the church. He knew the imperfections of even the best of men. He saw how prone they would be to passion and ambition; how ready to mistake love of sect or party for zeal for pure religion; how selfish and worldly men in the church might divide his followers, and produce unholy feeling and contention; and he saw, also, how much this would do to dishonor religion.

Hence, he took occasion, when he was about to die, to impress the importance of union on his disciples. By solemn admonition, and by most tender and affecting appeals to God in supplication, he showed his sense of the value of this union. He used the most sublime and impressive illustration; he adverted to the eternal union between the Father and himself; he reminded them of his love, and of the effect that their union would have on the world, to fix it more deeply in their hearts. The effect has shown the infinite wisdom of the Saviour. The contentions and strifes of Christians have shown his knowledge in foreseeing it. The effect of all this on religion has shown that he understood the value of union. Christians have contended long enough. It is time that they should hear the parting admonitions of their Redeemer, and go unitedly against their common foe. The world still lies in wickedness; and the friends of Jesus, bound by the cords of eternal love, should advance together against the common enemy, and spread the triumphs of the gospel around the globe. All that is needful now, under the blessing of God, to convince the world” that God sent the Lord Jesus, is that very union among all Christians for which he prayed;” and when that union of feeling, and purpose, and action shall take place, the task of sending the gospel to all nations will be soon accomplished, and the morning of the millennial glory will dawn upon the world.

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These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on John 17:23". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/john-17.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

John 17:23

I in them and Thou in Me

The three unions

There are three most admirable unions proposed to our faith in the Christian religion.
The Unity of Essence, in the Trinity; the Unity of Person, in Jesus Christ; and the union between Christ and His Church. The first of these is an ensample and prefiguration, as it were to the second; and the second to the third. For we cannot better represent the union with His Church, than by the hypostatic Union, or by the union of the Word with human nature (
1 John 4:8). (W. Norris.)

Unity in nature and grace

There is one remarkable difference between nature and grace; for nature of one makes many; for we are all but one in Adam, but grace of many makes one; for the Holy Ghost, who as a fire melts all the faithful into one mass, and makes of many one body, in the unity of God. (W. Dell.)

The union of believers with Christ

The Scriptures have borrowed from nature four metaphors, to describe this mystical union; but neither of these singly, or all of them jointly, can give us a full account of this mystery.

1. Not that of two pieces united by glue (1 Corinthians 6:17), for though this union be intimate, yet it is not vital.

2. Nor that of the graft and stock (Romans 6:5), for though this union be vital, yet the graft is of a more excellent kind and nature than the stock, and the tree receives its denomination from it; but Christ, into whom believers are ingrafted, is infinitely more excellent than they, and they are denominated from Him.

3. Nor conjugal union, for though this be exceeding dear and intimate, and they two become one flesh; yet it is not indissolvable, but must be broken by death; but this betwixt Christ and the soul abides to eternity.

4. Nor that of the Head and members united by one spirit, and so making one physical body (Ephesians 4:15-16), for though one soul actuates every member, yet it doth not knit every member alike near to the head, but here every member is alike nearly united with Christ the Head, the weak are as near to Him as the strong. Note

I. THE REALITY OF THIS UNION, which appears

1. From the communion which is betwixt Christ and believers (1 John 1:3). It signifies such fellowship or co-partnership, as persons have by a joint interest in one and the same enjoyment (Hebrews 3:14; Psalms 45:7). Now this communion is entirely dependent upon Union (1 Corinthians 3:22-23).

2. From the imputation of Christ’s righteousness for justification Romans 3:24; Rom_4:23-24; 1 Corinthians 1:30).

3. From the sympathy that is betwixt Christ and believers; Christ and the saints smile and sigh together (Colossians 1:24; Acts 9:5).

4. From the way in which the saints shall be raised at the last day Romans 8:11).

II. THE QUALITY AND NATURE OF THIS UNION. More generally, it is an intimate conjunction of believers to Christ, by the imparting of His Spirit to them, whereby they are enabled to believe and live in Him. All Divine spiritual life is originally in the Father, and cometh not to us, but by and through the Son (John 5:26; Romans 8:2). The Spirit must therefore first take hold of us, before we can live in Christ, and when He doth so, then we are enabled to exert that vital act of faith whereby we receive Christ (John 6:57). So that the Spirit’s work in uniting a soul into Christ is like the cutting off the graft from its native stock (which He doth by His illuminations and convictions) and closing it with the Living Vine, and so enabling it (by the infusion of faith) to draw the vital sap, and thus it becomes one with Him. Or as the many members in the natural body, being all quickened and animated by the same vital spirit, become one body with the Head (Ephesians 4:4).

1. Negatively it is

2. Positively.

(a) By way of sustentation: all our fruits of obedience depend upon John 15:4).

(b) To all our privileges and comfortable claims (1 Corinthians 3:1-23. ult.).

(c) To all our hopes and expectations of glory (Colossians 1:27). So then destroy this union, and with it you destroy all our fruits, privileges, and eternal hopes, at one stroke.

(10) It is an enriching union (1 Corinthians 1:30; 1Co_3:22). All that Christ hath becomes ours: His Father (John 20:17); His promises (2 Corinthians 1:20); His providences (Romans 8:28); His glory (John 17:24).

III. INFERENCES. If there be such an union betwixt Christ

1. Then what transcendent dignity hath God put on believers! Well might Constantine prefer the honour of being a member of the Church before that of being a head of the empire. Some imperious grandees would frown should some of these persons but presume to approach their presence; but God sets them before His face with delight, and angels delight to serve them.

2. Then the graces of believers can never totally fail (Colossians 3:3).

3. How great and powerful a motive then is this, to make us liberal in relieving the necessities and wants of every gracious person! For in relieving them we relieve Christ Himself (Matthew 25:35; Mat_25:40).

4. How unnatural then are all those acts of unkindness whereby believers wound and grieve Jesus Christi This is as if the hand should wound his own head, from which it receives life, sense, motion, and strength.

5. Then surely they can never want what is good for their souls or bodies. Every one naturally cares and provides for his own, especially for his own body. (J. Flavel.)

Christ in man

You may sometimes have seen a wife, wedded in true love and heart, surrender to a man who is good and strong. At first his goodness and strength are merely the object of her reverence, but gradually they seem to pass into her. New elements of character are developed in her, a firmness, a decisiveness, a breadth of view, a depth of sympathy which were wanting before. You would not say that her individuality had been lost; on the contrary, it seems informed, inspired, filled out and completed. You would not say that she was a reflection of him; no, you would rather say that she lives in him, or from another point of view, that he lives in her. Her relation to him is not imitative but receptive. He passes into her. If he is removed by death, it is observed not so much that she has lost something, as that part of her, the best and greater part, has gone; she is no longer what she was; she reminds you of a home that once had a tenant, but now though furniture and decorations remain the same, the tenant is there no more. In such an illustration we may get some idea of this august doctrine. It is something more than that hopeless task of copying the human life of Jesus, it is the actual communication of His Divine life, as the Lord Himself puts it “I in them.” He--shall we say? the beautiful and perfect spouse enters the soul, not ideally, but really; and entering in He moulds the ugly and repulsive outlines of our being into conformity with His own. (R. F. Horton, M. A.)

The indwelling of Christ

On a bright but chilly day in early spring you see your friend walking on the shady side of the street, as some foolish people will do. You call over to him: “Come and walk in the sun with me.” The sun is many millions of miles away, yet you speak of being in it, and walking in it, when you are bathed in the light and warmth continually proceeding from it. In the same way are we in Christ when we are surrounded by the gracious loving presence of His Holy Spirit. So, “Ye in Me.” But not only must the light be around us, but in us, before we can be said to live in it and walk in it. A blind man is surrounded by the sunlight as any one else is, but he does not live in it; he does not walk in it; he cannot enjoy it. Why not? Simply because it is not in him. We must have eyes; and these eyes must be opened to receive the light into the body, so that we may live in it, and walk in it, and enjoy it. And in the same way must the eye of faith be opened to receive the heavenly light into the soul before we can even be aware of its presence; and it must be kept open in order that we may “walk in the light as He is in the light.” Christ must be in us by His Holy Spirit in order that we may live in Him. (J. L. Nye.)

Thou hast loved them as thou hast loved Me

The Father’s love to the believer

I. THE GROUNDS ON WHICH WE MAY UNDERSTAND THIS TO BE POSSIBLE.

1. God cannot love but with all the love He has. He can never be less than God--that is, perfect. He can do nothing which even He could improve upon. Then, when He loves, it is in the fullest measure in which even God can love. “Now Jesus loved Martha,” &c., that sounds as if He loved them more than others, so does “the disciple whom Jesus loved,” but not necessarily so, because they were more responsive to that love. The difference is not in God, but in us--in our reception of His love.

2. Those who believe in Christ, are loved in Him. In connection with the rest of the prayer it is not so hard to believe the text. If there be this oneness between Him and them, how can it be otherwise.

3. The sacrifice of Christ manifests such a love. For how must the Father feel to those for whom He gave His Son?

II. THE CHARACTER OF THE DIVINE LOVE WHICH THIS IMPLIES.

1. It is love checked by no barrier. Once it was checked, it could not utter itself because of sin. You have seen a swollen stream heave, impatient of restraint, against the flood-gates which keep it back. It was so once with God’s love to men. But the barrier is removed, “Christ hath put away sin by the sacrifice of Himself,” and now that love leaps forth free to all. But it finds another check, hearts are closed to its reception, it surges round them seeking to enter, but for the most part in vain; it cannot have its way with men because they will not let it. But not so all. Some have “known and believed the love that God has to them,” they have opened their hearts to it and it can do for them what it would; these are they who believe on Christ, see their sin put away in Him, and in Him their acceptance by the Father; to them that love goes forth as to Him.

2. It is a love of closest intimacy. There is a love which is little more than kindly feeling, there is that which is mainly a delight in what perhaps we cannot approach, there is the love of friendship with its exchange of confidence and mutual happiness, but there is also the love of some one who comes so near to us that he is our second self. That most nearly represents the Father’s love to the Son, “the only begotten Son who is in the bosom of the Father.” We are apt to be content with much less, cherishing but a reverence to God which keeps us at a distance, and not blending with it a confidence as great which compels us to “draw near.” God forbid that we lose the reverence, but that we lose the confidence God forbid too! Yet that is our portion, since Christ says the Father has loved us as He loved Him.

3. It is an everlasting love. For the Father’s love to the Son will never cease, and through earth’s sins and sorrows and conflicts, through all the changes we dread, through the mystery of death, in the glory of heaven and throughout its endless future, unweariedly the Father will love us still.

III. THE EFFECT OF THIS LOVE OF GOD ON HIS PEOPLE, or rather, the effect of knowing it.

1. It satisfies when every other love fails. And that is always.

2. It is the quickening power of holiness. For the way into holiness is to be loved into it by God. (C. New.)

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "John 17:23". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/john-17.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

I in them, and thou in me, that they may be perfected into one; that the world may know that thou didst send me, and lovedst them, even as thou lovedst me.

I in them, and thou in me ... See under preceding verse (John 17:22) and under John 14:20. The perfect unity flows out of perfect submission to the total will of God in Christ, resulting in "one Lord, one faith, one baptism, etc." (Ephesians 4:4f). God's love of Christ means God's love of Christ's body, which is his church.

Copyright Statement
Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 17:23". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-17.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

I in them,.... Christ is in his saints; not as he is in all the world, being the omnipresent God; or as he is in every man, communicating the light of nature as Creator; or as he is in the human nature, which is united to his divine person; or circumscriptively to the exclusion of him elsewhere; for he is in heaven, his blood is within the veil, and his righteousness without us: but he is in them, in a gracious manner, in regeneration; when he is revealed to them, formed in them, enters into them, takes possession of them, communicates his grace, grants fellowship with himself, and dwells in them; not only by his Spirit and grace, but in person, as the head in the members, as the master of the house, and the King of them; which is an instance of condescending grace, and is peculiar to God's elect: hence all their holiness and fruitfulness; nor shall they ever perish; their bodies shall rise from the dead, and being reunited to their souls, Christ will be in them in a glorious manner to all eternity:

and thou in me; the Father is in Christ, not only by union of nature, nor merely in him, as Mediator, in a way of grace; but as he will show himself in and through him in glory for evermore, and is what is here prayed for:

that they may be made perfect in one; this regards not their justification, which is already perfect; nor their sanctification, which will be; but either perfection in glory, when they will be perfect in knowledge, in holiness, in peace, joy and love: or rather the perfection of their numbers is meant, when the whole election of grace will be completed in regeneration, sanctification, and glorification:

and that the world may know that thou hast sent me: as before; See Gill on John 17:21;

and hast loved them, as thou hast loved me. The Oriental versions, the Syriac, Arabic, Persic, and Ethiopic, all read the words thus, "and I have loved them, as thou hast loved me"; contrary to all the Greek copies, and other versions, which read as we do. The Father loved Christ as his own Son, and as Mediator; so he loved him when he assumed human nature, and became obedient to his will both in doing and suffering; when his Father left him, and poured out his wrath upon him, and when he laid down his life for the sheep. The instances of his love to him as Mediator are, his putting all things into his hands, showing him all that he does, and concealing nothing from him, and appointing him the only Saviour, the head of the church, and Judge of the world. The nature of this love is, that it is from eternity; is a love of complacency and delight; it is special and peculiar, unchangeable and inseparable, and will last for ever: now God has loved his people, as he has loved his Son; he loves them not merely as creatures, as the descendants of Adam, or as considered in themselves, but as in Christ. The instances of his love to them are, his choosing them in Christ; making a covenant with them in him; the mission of him into this world, to obtain salvation for them; the quickening and calling of them by his grace; the care he takes of them afterwards in supplying their wants, supporting them under temptations, delivering them out of afflictions, and causing all things to work together for their good; to all which add the provisions he makes for them, both for time and eternity. The nature of this love is such as that he bears to Christ; it is from everlasting; a love of the utmost delight and pleasure; it is special and peculiar, unchangeable, and will continue for ever: there is not the same reason for his loving them as his Son; and this as must not be thought to denote equality, but similitude and order.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on John 17:23". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-17.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

I in them, and thou in me, that they may be made perfect in one — (See on John 17:21).

Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 17:23". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/john-17.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

That they may be perfected into one (ινα ωσιν τετελειωμενοι εις ενhina ōsin teteleiōmenoi eis hen). Purpose clause again with ιναhina (nineteen times in this prayer, this the fifteenth) with the periphrastic perfect passive subjunctive of τελειοωteleioō (John 17:4), permanent state, with εις ενeis hen (into one) as the goal and final result.

That the world may know (ινα γινωσκηιhina ginōskēi). Present active subjunctive of γινωσκωginōskō with ιναhina like the present tense of πιστευωpisteuō in John 17:21, “that the world may keep on knowing” with the same pregnant phrase “that thou me didst send” (οτι συ με απεστειλαςhoti su me apesteilas) as in John 17:8, John 17:25.

And lovedst them
(και ηγαπησας αυτουςkai ēgapēsas autous). Timeless aorist, but love shown by sending Christ (John 3:16) and illustrated and proven by the way Christians love one another.

Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 17:23". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-17.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

The Fourfold Gospel

I in them, and thou in me, that they may be perfected into one; that the world may know that thou didst send me2, and lovedst them, even as thou lovedst me3.

  1. And the glory which thou hast given me I have given unto them. He here states that the perfect unity of the church and the putting forth of its power in harmonious effort to convert the world will be equivalent to a demonstration of the truth of his divine mission.

  2. That the world may know that thou didst send me. John 17:22 asserts that the initial stages of unity will produce faith in the world, and this verse adds that the perfection of that unity will lead the world beyond faith into the realm of actual knowledge as to the divine mission of Christ.

  3. And lovedst them, even as thou lovedst me. The context suggests that this unity will result in gracious manifestations of the Father's love. Possibly these manifestations may be of such a nature as to aid in bringing about the state of knowledge mentioned.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 17:23". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-17.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Я в них, и Ты во Мне. Христос тем самым говорит, что в нем находится вся полнота благ. И то, что раньше было сокрыто в Боге, теперь ясно предстает в Его лице. И именно это Он сообщает Своим людям, подобно тому, как вода, истекая из источника через канал, орошает все окрестные поля.

И возлюбил их. Христос говорит: символ и залог божественной любви к благочестивым состоит в том, что мир волей-неволей должен ее признать. Ведь обитающий в них Дух излучает бесчисленные лучи праведности и святости. Бог каждый день свидетельствует нам бесчисленными способами сколь отечески нас любит, но признак усыновления по праву стоит на первом месте. Кроме того, Христос добавляет: «Я возлюбил их, как Ты возлюбил Меня». Этими словами Он означает причину и происхождение данной любви. Ведь уподобительный союз следует понимать как причинный. Христос как бы говорит: Потому что Ты возлюбил Меня. Ибо одному лишь Христу приличествует быть возлюбленным. Небесный же Отец той же самой любовью, которой любит главу Церкви, возлюбил и все члены Его тела. Так что Он любит кого-либо только во Христе. Но здесь появляется видимость противоречия. Ведь Христос, как мы уже видели, проповедует, что безмерная любовь Бога к миру послужила для Него причиной отдать Единородного Сына. И поскольку причина должна предшествовать следствию, мы заключаем, что Бог возлюбил людей помимо Христа. То есть, прежде чем Он был назначен их Искупителем. Отвечаю: здесь и в похожих местах любовью зовется милосердие, которое Бог испытывал к недостойным, и даже к Своим врагам, прежде чем примирил их с Собою. Действительно, чудесная и непостижимая для человеческого разума благость: в людях, которых должен был ненавидеть, Бог по благоволению устранил причины этой ненависти, дабы ничто не мешало Его любви. Павел же говорит, что мы возлюблены во Христе в двух смыслах (Еф.1:4; Рим.5:10). Во-первых, Отец избрал нас в Нем прежде создания мира, а во-вторых, в Нем же Он примирил нас с Собою, сделав Его за нас умилостивлением. Вот каким образом мы являемся одновременно и врагами, и друзьями, доколе после искупления грехов не возвращаемся в божественное благоволение. Оправдав же нас через веру, Бог лишь тогда начинает любить нас как Отец – Своих детей. Та же любовь, по которой для нас был назначен Христос, по которой, еще не родившись, но уже пав в Адаме, мы избираемся по благодати, сокрыта в сердце Божием и превосходит силы человеческого разума. Никто не почувствует, что Бог к нему милостив, если не узрит Его милостивым во Христе. Кроме того: как по устранению Христа исчезает всякое ощущение божественной любви, так и нет никакой опасности того, что мы, насажденные в Нем верою, отпадем от божественной любви. Ибо нельзя ниспровергнуть положение: Бог любит нас, потому что возлюбил Христа.

 

 

 

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 17:23". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-17.html. 1840-57.

Scofield's Reference Notes

perfect (See Scofield "Matthew 5:48").

world kosmos = mankind. (See Scofield "Matthew 4:8").

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Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on John 17:23". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/john-17.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

23 I in them, and thou in me, that they may be made perfect in one; and that the world may know that thou hast sent me, and hast loved them, as thou hast loved me.

Ver. 23. I in them, and thou in me] Christ was the only fit mediator; as being God for the business with God; and man for the business with man. He is the bridge that joineth heaven and earth together, saith Gregory. He is that ladder of ascension to God; faith first lays hold upon Christ as man, and by it, as by a mean, makes way to God; and in it embraceth the Godhead, which is of itself fire consuming. We may safely sail through Christ’s blood into the bosom of the Father.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 17:23". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-17.html. 1865-1868.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Observe here, 1. That as the Father is in Christ, so is Christ, in believers, and they in him: the Father is in Christ in respect of his divine nature, essence, and attributes; and Christ is in believers, by the inhabitation of his Holy Spirit.

Observe, 2. That the believers' happiness consisteth in their oneness, in being one with God through Christ, and one amongst themselves: That they may be made perfect in one.

Observe, 3. That God the Father loveth Christ his Son: Thou lovest them, as thou hast loved me.

God loveth Christ, first, as God; so he is Primum Amabile, the first object of his love, as representing his attributes exactly.

Secondly, as Mediator, Therefore doth my Father love me, because I lay down my life for my sheep. John 10:17.

Observe, 4. That God the Father loves believers, even as he loved Christ himself; that is, he loves them upon the same grounds that he loved him; namely, for their nearness, and for their likeness to him.

1. For their nearness and relation to him; he loveth Christ as his Son, believers as his children, Behold what manner of love the Father bestoweth upon us, that we should be called the sons of God! 1 John 3:1.

2. The properties of the Father's love towards Christ and believers are the same: doth he love Christ with a tender love, with an unchangeable love, with an everlasting love? so doth he love believers also.

Observe, 5. That Christ would have the world know, that God the Father loveth the children of men, as well as himself; Christ is not ambitious to engross all our love unto himself, but would have the world take notice of the good-will of his Father, as well as of himself, to lost mankind; of the Father's loving himself, as well as of his own love in coming: That the world may know that thou hast sent me, and hast loved them, as thou hast loved me.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on John 17:23". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/john-17.html. 1700-1703.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

John 17:23. ἐγὼ, I) viz. am.— τετελειωμένοι εἰς ἕν, consummated [“made perfect”] in one) being brought on to perfect unity.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 17:23". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-17.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

I in them; not only as my Divine nature is united to their flesh, but as I have made them partakers of my Spirit, and of the Divine nature; as I have loved them with a special and peculiar love, and am the head, they the members; I the vine, they the branches.

And thou in me, the fulness of the Godhead dwelling in me bodily; I being the brightness of thy glory, the express image of thy person; thou also doing whatsoever I do, and accepting and approving of it, as John 14:10.

That they may be made perfect in one; the Greek is, eis en, into one; in one body, whereof Christ is the Head; which body is the church, keeping a unity of faith; all believing the same things in matter of faith, and those things no other than what thou hast revealed, and I have revealed as from thee. This, O Father, will be a great evidence, both that thou hast sent me, when the world shall see thee bowing men’s hearts to the obedience of the truth of thy gospel; and that thou hast loved them with a tender and everlasting love, as thou hast loved me.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 17:23". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-17.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

совершены воедино Здесь мысль заключается в том, чтобы они были собраны вместе вокруг спасающей истины, живя одинаковой духовной жизнью. На эту молитву был получен ответ в действительности (1Кор. 12:12, 13; Еф. 2:14-22).

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on John 17:23". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/john-17.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Increasing union of views, affections, and efforts among the disciples of Christ, will furnish increasing evidence of the divine excellence of his religion, and lead increasing numbers to embrace it.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on John 17:23". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/john-17.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

23.Thou in me—So that the very centre and nucleus of this unity is God himself.

The unity of the Church consists in doctrine and in spirit. The historian of evangelical doctrine finds that the system, in its great outlines, forms a grand architectural structure, extending through ages, identical in its general outlines, and excluding all mere half-faiths, heresies, novelties, and infidelities. As such a system it does, by its self-consistency, strength, and permanence, form a powerful proof of the reality of the Christian faith, calculated to make the world believe.

Yet deeper and more absolute is the unity of the spirit. Doctrinal differences are many; Christian experience is vitally one. Says Dr. Shedd: “Tried by the test of exact dogmatic statement, there is a plain difference between the creed of the Arminian and the Calvinist; but tried by the test of practical piety and devout feeling, there is little difference between the character of John Wesley and John Calvin.” For this he assigns as a reason, that “the practical religions life is much more a product of the Holy Spirit than is the speculative construction of Scripture truth. Piety is certainly the product of divine grace; but the creed is not certainly formed under divine illumination.”

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 17:23". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-17.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

This verse advances the thought of John 17:21. Jesus wanted the unity among believers to be so great and so clear that the world would believe Jesus" message. The world would also see that God had poured out His love on believers as well as Jesus. Notice that Jesus implied that He would indwell believers as the Father indwelt Him. All three members of the Godhead indwell the Christian ( John 14:23; Romans 8:9; Colossians 1:27). God"s indwelling presence unites Christians in the body of Christ and glorifies God.

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on John 17:23". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/john-17.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

John 17:23. I in them, and thou in me, that they may be perfected into one. That is: not only that this oneness may be readied, but that, in its being so, the last step to be taken with believers may be accomplished, the final issue and perfect of all that Jesus has to do for them. Whereupon follows again the effect to be produced upon he world, stated, however, in a fuller form than in John 17:21.

That the world may learn to know that thou didst send me, and lovedst them even as thou lovedst me. The substitution of ‘learn to know’ here for ‘believe’ in John 17:21 is remarkable. The two words cannot be understood to signify the same thing, nor can the latter, in conformity with the style of this Gospel, express less than the former. In one way or another there must be an advance of thought. We see this in the addition of the clause, ‘lovedst them even as Thou lovedst Me.’ A similar advance must be traced on the point immediately before us. Chap. John 14:31 appears to solve the difficulty. There the same word is used as in the present verse, and we are thus invited to extend our thoughts beyond the number of those who shall be led to faith. The whole world shall recognise what Jesus speaks of: even they who do not confess in faith shall confess in shame, that He whom they rejected was the loved of the Father, and that He has gathered His people into the same blessed unity of love.

It is in this verse that the unity of the followers of Jesus is peculiarly dwelt upon. Their spirituality is accompanied by its highest result when it is perfected into unity; and with this result is connected the most powerful impression which they make upon the world. It is therefore a visible unity for which Jesus prays. His Church is visible; and that idea of an invisible Church, in which Christians seek an escape from the sentence of condemnation which their divisions compel them to pronounce upon themselves, finds as little countenance in these verses as in any other part of Scripture.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 17:23". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-17.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

John 17:23. of John 17:22 becomes in John 17:23 , “that they may be perfected into one”. They are perfected by being wrought to a Divine unity. The work of Christ is accomplished when men are one by Christ dwelling in them. God is in Him, He is in each believer, and thus a true and final unity is formed. One result is the conviction wrought in the world, . The mission of Christ and its results prove not only the Father’s love of the Son but His love for men.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on John 17:23". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/john-17.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on John 17:23". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/john-17.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

made perfect = perfected. Greek. teleioo. Same word as "finish" in John 17:4.

in = into. Greek. eis. App-104.

and. All omit.

hast sent = didst send.

hast loved = lovedst.

loved. Greek. agapao. See p. 1511.

as = even as.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 17:23". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-17.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

I in them, and thou in me, that they may be made perfect in one; and that the world may know that thou hast sent me, and hast loved them, as thou hast loved me.

I in them, and thou in me, that they may be made perfect in one, [ eis (Greek #1519) hen (Greek #1520)] - 'into one [thing];'

And that the world may know that thou hast sent ('didst send') me, and hast loved them, as thou hast loved me, [ apesteilas (Greek #649) - eegapeesas (Greek #25)] - 'and lovedst them even as Thou lovedst Me.' Everything in this verse, except the last clause, had been substantially said before. But while the reiteration adds weight to the wonderful sentiment, the variation in the way of putting it throws additional light on a subject on which all the light afforded us is unspeakably precious. Before, the oneness of believers was said to be simply 'in the Father and the Son.' Here, a certain arrangement of the steps, if we may so speak, is indicated. First in order is the Father's indwelling in the Son, by His Spirit - "Thou in Me;" next, the Son's indwelling in believers by the same Spirit - "I in them:" only "God giveth not His Spirit by measure unto the Son" (John 3:34), but "anointeth Him with the oil of gladness above His fellows" (Psalms 45:7), because it is His of right, as the Son and the Righteous One in our nature.

Thus is provision made for "their being made perfect into one," or worked into a glorious Unity, only reflecting the Higher Divine Unity. We have said that the last clause of this verse is the only part of it which had not been expressed before; nor had such an astonishing word been ever uttered before by the Lord Jesus: "that the world may know that thou ... LOVEDST THEM EVEN AS THOU LOVEDST ME." In much that He had before said this was implied; but never until now was it actually expressed. Here, again, it is not the essential love of the Son by the Father, in their eternal Divine Personality, that Jesus here speaks of; for with that no creature may intermeddle. It is the Father's love of His Incarnate Son, as Head of His redeemed, that is meant-ravishing the Father's eye with the beauty of a divine character, a perfect righteousness, a glorious satisfaction for sin in our nature. This complacency of the Father in the Son passes over to and rests upon all that believe in the Son; or rather it descends from and penetrates through the Head to all the members of that living Unity which is made up of Him and them - "like the precious ointment upon the head, that ran down upon the beard, even Aaron's beard; that went down to the skirts of his garments; as the dew that descended upon the mountains of Zion: for there the Lord commanded the blessing, even life forevermore" (Psalms 133:2-3). But though we should suppose that of all things this was the most invisible to the world, yet it seems that even the conviction of this was in some sense to be impressed upon the world: "that the world may know that Thou hast loved them, as Thou hast loved Me." Of course this could only be by its effects: nor can even these be expected to convince the world that the Father's love to believers is the same as His love to His own Son, in any but a very general sense, so long as it remains "the world." But it would have a double effect: it would inspire the world, even as such, with a conviction, which they would be unable to resist and could ill conceal, that Christ and Christians are alike of God and owned of God; and that conviction, going deeper down into the hearts of some, would ripen into a surrender of themselves, as willing captives, to that love divine which sent through the Son salvation to a lost world.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 17:23". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-17.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(23) I in them, and thou in me.—These words are best regarded as a parenthesis more explicitly setting forth the thought of the union of the Father, the Son, and the believer. The thought is continued from the last verse, “That they may be one even as we are one: I in them, and Thou in Me, that they may be made perfect in one.” It is the thought which the words of Christ have uttered again and again, and which we yet feel that no words can utter. The disciples heard the words immediately after they had heard the allegory of the true vine (John 15); and the fullest meaning of separate words and phrases in these chapters is best arrived at by remembering that they were not uttered as separate words and phrases, but that they were spoken as a whole, and should be read as a whole; and that the most unfathomable of them were spoken in prayer from the Son to the Father.

That they may be made perfect in one.—Better, . . . unto one. The unity is the result of their being made perfect. (Comp. Notes on Hebrews 10:14 and 1 John 2:5; 1 John 4:12; 1 John 4:17-18.)

And that the world may know that thou hast sent me.—Better, . . . didst send Me. Comp. John 17:21. “That the world may know” (recognise) here is parallel to “that the world may believe,” in the earlier verse. We are to regard it, therefore, as another instance of the repeated expression of the fulness of thought; and this is borne out by the parallel in John 13:35; John 14:31. The thought which has been introduced here of the conviction of the unbelieving world, seems to be opposed to the context. The prayer is that the world, seeing in its midst the power which binds men together in unity, may believe and know that this is of God, who sent Christ into the world, and may accept for themselves the message of love which the “Sent of God” has brought unto them. (Comp. Note on John 3:16.)

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 17:23". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-17.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

I in them, and thou in me, that they may be made perfect in one; and that the world may know that thou hast sent me, and hast loved them, as thou hast loved me.
I
6:56; 14:10,23; Romans 8:10,11; 1 Corinthians 1:30; 2 Corinthians 5:21; Galatians 3:28; 1 John 1:3; 1 John 4:12-16
made
Ephesians 4:12-16; Philippians 3:15; Colossians 1:28; 2:2,9,10; 3:14; 1 Peter 5:10
the
13:35
and hast
24; Ephesians 1:6-14; 1 John 3:1; 4:19
Reciprocal: 1 Samuel 25:29 - with the Lord;  Isaiah 43:4 - I Have;  Zechariah 2:11 - thou;  John 3:35 - Father;  John 14:7 - ye;  John 14:21 - that loveth;  John 15:4 - I;  John 15:9 - the Father;  John 16:27 - the Father;  John 17:21 - they all;  John 17:26 - and I;  Romans 8:29 - to be;  1 Corinthians 1:10 - that ye;  1 Corinthians 8:6 - and one;  2 Corinthians 5:17 - be;  2 Corinthians 5:19 - God;  2 Corinthians 13:5 - Jesus Christ;  2 Corinthians 13:11 - Be perfect;  Ephesians 3:17 - Christ;  Colossians 1:27 - Christ;  Colossians 3:11 - and;  Hebrews 13:21 - Make;  James 1:4 - perfect and;  1 John 4:4 - greater

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 17:23". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-17.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Ver. 23. "I in them, and Thou in Me, that they may be made perfect in one; and that the world may know that Thou hast sent Me, and hast loved them, as Thou hast loved Me."

The words, "that they may be perfected into one," resume the thought of ver. 22, in order to connect with it the statement of the end which this unity would subserve, the glorious result which would accrue from it: "And if they shall thus become one, the world will thereby know," etc. It is added, that this unity, in order to the attainment of that end, must be a perfect one—"perfected into one," that is, all merging into this unity. A blessed residuum of the unity which Christ prays for is even now present in the Church, notwithstanding all appearances. But Christ's people are as yet far removed from perfect oneness, and on that account the influence of their unity is only imperfect and partial. No other way, however, leads to the consummation of this oneness, but a sinking deeper into Christ; and the conflict which seeks to remove the obstacles to this deeper sinking into Him, is often more helpful to unity than the attempts to establish an enforced unity.

From the prayer for their preservation in time, our Lord turns, in the conclusion, which corresponds with the beginning, to a prayer for their eternal salvation; first the prayer itself, ver. 24, then the ground on which it is urged, vers. 25, 26. Luther: "This is the last but the most comforting thing in the prayer, for all who hang upon Christ, that thus we become confident as to what we have to hope for in the end, as to where we are to find our final rest, we who are in this world, poor and despised, and without any continuing city."

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Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on John 17:23". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/john-17.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

23.I in them, and thou in me; for he intends to teach that in him dwells all fullness of blessings, and that what was concealed in God is now manifested in him, that he may impart it to his people, as the water, flowing from the fountain by various channels, waters the fields on all sides.

And hast loved them, (126) He means that it is a very striking exhibition, and a very excellent pledge, of the love of God towards believers, which the world is compelled to feel, whether it will or not, when the Holy Spirit dwelling in them sends forth the rays of righteousness and holiness. There are innumerable other ways, indeed, in which God daily testifies his fatherly love towards us, but the mark of adoption is justly preferred to them all. He likewise adds,and hast loved them, As Thou Hast Loved Me. By these words he intended to point out the cause and origin of the love; for the particle as, means because, and the words, AS thou hast loved me, mean, Because thou hast loved me; for to Christ alone belongs the title of Well-beloved, (Matthew 3:17.) Besides, that love which the heavenly Father bears towards the Head is extended to all the members, so that he loves none but in Christ.

Yet this gives rise to some appearance of contradiction; for Christ, as we have seen elsewhere (127) declares that the unspeakable love of God towards the world was the reason why he gave his only-begotten Son, (John 3:16.) If the cause must go before the effect, we infer that God the Father loved men apart from Christ; that is, before he was appointed to be the Redeemer. I reply, in that, and similar passages, love denotes the mercy with which God was moved towards unworthy persons, and even towards his enemies, before he reconciled them to himselfi It is, indeed, a wonderful goodness of God, and inconceivable by the human mind, that, exercising benevolence towards men whom he could not but hate, he removed the cause of the hatred, that there might be no obstruction to his love. And, indeed, Paul informs us that there are two ways in which we are loved in Christ; first, because the Father

chose us in him before the creation of the world,
(
Ephesians 1:4;)

and, secondly, because in Christ God hath reconciled us to himself, and hath showed that he is gracious to us, (Romans 5:10.) Thus we are at the same time the enemies and the friends of God, until, atonement having been made for our sins, we are restored to favor with God. But when we are justified by faith, it is then, properly, that we begin to be loved by God, as children by a father. That love by which Christ was appointed to be the person, in whom we should be fiercly chosen before we were born, and while we were still ruined in Adam, is hidden in the breast of God, and far exceeds the capacity of the human mind. True, no man will ever feel that God is gracious to him, unless he perceives that God is pacified in Christ. But as all relish for the love of God vanishes when Christ is taken away, so we may safely conclude that, since by faith we are ingrafted into his body, there is no danger of our falling from the love of God; for this foundation cannot be overturned, that we are loved, because the Father hath loved his Son. (128)

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 17:23". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-17.html. 1840-57.