Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 17:24

Father, I desire that they also, whom You have given Me, be with Me where I am, so that they may see My glory which You have given Me, for You loved Me before the foundation of the world.
New American Standard Version
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Adam Clarke Commentary

That they may behold my glory - That they may enjoy eternal felicity with me in thy kingdom. So the word is used, John 3:3; Matthew 5:8. The design of Christ is, that all who believe should love and obey, persevere unto the end, and be eternally united to himself, and the ever blessed God, in the kingdom of glory.

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 17:24". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-17.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

I will - This expression, though it commonly denotes command, is here only expressive of desire. It is used in prayer, and it was not the custom of the Saviour to use language of command when addressing God. It is often used to express strong and earnest desire, or a pressing and importunate wish, such as we are exceedingly anxious should not be denied, Mark 6:25; Mark 10:35; Matthew 12:38; Matthew 15:28.

Where I am - In heaven. The Son of God was still in the bosom of the Father, John 1:18. See the notes at John 7:34. Probably the expression here means where I shall be.

My glory - My honor and dignity when exalted to the right hand of God. The word “behold” implies more than simply seeing; it means also to participate, to enjoy. See the John 3:3 note; Matthew 5:8 note.

Thou lovedst me … - This is another of the numerous passages which prove that the Lord Jesus existed before the creation of the world. It is not possible to explain it on any other supposition.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on John 17:24". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/john-17.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

John 17:24

Father I will that they also whom Thou hast given Me be with Me.

Christ’s last will

Jesus no longer says, “I pray” but “I will.” This expression, found nowhere else, in the mouth of Jesus, is generally explained by saying that the Son thus expressed Himself, because He felt Himself on this point so fully in accordance with the Father. But this He felt in every prayer, and this unique expression must be taken in its relation to the unique character of the situation. It is the saying of a dying man: “Father, My last will is … ” It is truly His testament which Christ thus deposits in His Father’s hands. (F. Godet, D. D.)

Christ’s wish for man

The truth that men are judged by their desires finds its highest illustration in Jesus. The perfection of His nature is shown in the perfectness of His wishes. When His desires shall be all fulfilled, then there will be nothing more in the universe to be desired. The wish of the text is a prayer; but a prayer is merely a wish turned Godward. It was the instinct of Christ’s nature that He looked for the fulfilment of His wishes, not to Himself, and not to the things about Him, but to His Father. He was desiring in His heart

I. THAT HIS PEOPLE SHOULD BE WITH HIM.

1. The obvious meaning of this is the Saviour’s affection for His disciples. When friend is going away from friend, how naturally the wish springs up into words: “Oh, if I could only take you with me!” Now, the sublimity and the charm of the earthly life of Jesus consist in large part in the broad and healthy action of the simplest human powers which it exhibits. The simplest natures are the grandest natures always. And so it is a part of the greatness of Jesus that He so simply feels and utters this cordial human affection, and says, “I shall miss you. I wish you could go with Me.” We want not merely to admire this in Jesus; not merely to feel its charm. We want to catch it from Him. Elaborate civilization is always making elaborate, artificial standards.

2. But these primary emotions are deeper and richer in Him than in ordinary men, in proportion to the depth and richness of His nature.

Christ till we are like Him. Not till He is formed in us do we enter truly into Him.

II. THAT THEY MIGHT BEHOLD HIS GLORY. Perhaps this sounds to us a little strange at first. The schoolboy wants his schoolfellow to come home with him that he may see the state in which his father lives. The American says to the foreigner, “Come, see our land, its vastness, its resources, its progress.” The Christian says, “Come to my church. You shall hear our music,” &c. Before the words can be cut entirely free from low associations, we must remember what Christ’s glory is. The heart and soul of it must be His goodness. What outward splendour may clothe Christ eternally we cannot know, but this we are sure of, that in at its very centre the glory of God must issue from and consist in the goodness of God, not in His power. Think for a moment of what prospects that wish of our Lord opens. Nowadays men are telling one another how tired they are of seeing sin on every side. We cheat ourselves if we think that it is peculiar to our times, for it has always been so. We cheat ourselves if we think that it is universal, for there is bright and glorious goodness around us, mixed with the sin on every side. But how imperfectly we see it! How much goodness there must be in Him which we do not see! For here this truth comes in, that only the like can see its like; only the good can really discern, appreciate, and understand goodness. Men live alongside of the best saints, and never know that they are good. The higher we climb, the more the peaks open around us. Now apply all this to the Saviour’s prayer. Only by growth in goodness can His goodness open itself to us. What is He praying for, then? Is it not that which we traced before, that we might be like Him? So only can we see Him. It is His glory that He wants us to see, but, back of that, He wants us to be such men and women that we can see His glory. I think of Jesus as He walked through Jerusalem. Men passed Him by; others just looked at Him, and sneered, and went their way. Do you think that did not give Him pain? Surely it did. They could not see His glory. But was not His pain that He saw them incapable of apprehending Him? Was not this what He was really mourning for when He sat on the Mount of Olives? Not, “Woe is me!” but “O Jerusalem?” Sometimes, in very far-off way, it is given to a man to echo this experience of Jesus. Sometimes a man is living for the good of other people, and other people will not see it, and he is left to sit upon the mountain and look down in sorrow upon the city which he longs to save. At such a time a man wants, and often enough he fails to get, the spirit of Christ’s prayer. He wants men to “see His glory,” and they will not. Is it for himself or for them that he is disappointed? The man whom you helped yesterday and who ungratefully slanders you to-day, are you indignant about yourself or pitiful over him? It is hard to keep out pride and jealousy, but let us remember how He wanted men to see Him because it was so wretched for them, not for Him, that they should be blind to Him. I think, then, that we have reached the meaning of this prayer of Jesus; and we are struck immediately by seeing how it really is identical with all His prayers for men. It is always that men might be saved from sin, that His goodness might come to us and we might be good. (Phillips Brooks, D. D.)

Christ’s prayer for His people

I. THE TONE OF THE PRAYER.

1. Wonderful majesty. “Father, I will!” How awful this sounds! Such a petition was never heard before. Compare it with the prayers of the most eminent of God’s people--Abraham, David, and Solomon.

2. Authority as well. Here is no condition, qualification, or contingency expressed or implied. It is the language of Him whose will is absolute law through all the universe. And this is the foundation on which the ultimate salvation of the redeemed is made to rest.

II. THE SCOPE OF THE PRAYER

1. The persons prayed for are--“those whom Thou hast given Me”--believers of every age. It takes in all the redeemed.

2. What is asked is “that they be with Me where I am.” This is a comprehensive petition. It embraces all that Christ could ask for His people, all that they can desire, or that God can give. There has been much curious discussion of the question whether heaven is a state or a place. It is clear from the teachings of the chapter, that heaven is a stale (John 17:21; Joh_17:23). The unity prayed for in the former and the perfection in the latter of these verses prove this conclusively. No locality can be heaven to us, unless we attain unto the state there described. At the same time this verse proves that heaven is a distinct locality (John 14:2). If He were speaking here as the Creator alone, the language used would not necessarily imply locality. But He is speaking as “the Man Christ Jesus.” “True, ‘where I am’ is a wide, wide phrase. Where He is, heaven is; where He is not, there is hell. A throne without Him is but the devil’s dungeon of darkness, wherever it be placed; a dungeon with Christ in it, a fiery furnace with Christ in the midst, is a palace of glory. If we be where He is, what is there that can be worth seeing, or knowing, or having besides? ‘Whom have I in heaven but Thee?’”

III. THE DESIGN OF THE PRAYER. “That they may behold My glory,” &c. This refers to the glory which pertains to Him by virtue of His mediatorial office. It is the glory of revealing God’s will; of bringing to an end the great rebellion which sin had introduced into God’s dominions; of lifting off the curse from this groaning creation; of making all things new; of gathering His elect out of all nations, of raising them from the dead, and carrying them with approval through the solemn scenes of the last judgment, and assigning them the place of dignity they will occupy in His everlasting kingdom; and of conducting the affairs of that kingdom through all eternity.

IV. THE FOUNDATION ON WHICH THE PRAYER RESTS. “For Thou lovedst Me,” &c. There is something very striking and sublime in this argument. It is not our love for one another or of God, nor Christ’s or the Father’s love for us, but God’s love of His own blessed Son. In conclusion, this subject suggests

1. How unspeakable is the glory on which the redeemed will gaze!

2. The true philosophy of salvation, or the secret of the Christian’s security. (R. Newton, D. D.)

The Lord’s last prayer for His people

We mark

I. HIS LAST AND DEEPEST DESIRE CONCERNING US.

1. There is something unspeakably affecting in the designation “those whom Thou hast given Me.” Many titles He had already given His people--disciples, friends, brethren, &c.; names advancing in depth of tendernessas the end drew nigh; but here at the last He recalls one that He had used among the first. He does not point to the larger gift of the human race (Psalms 2:1-12.); nor does He indicate any fragment predestined to be His; the sentiment is that all whom the Father teaches He draws by His Spirit, that He may consign them to His Son for salvation. The fact that they are the Father’s gift makes them unspeakably precious to Jesus, who therefore wishes the eternal society of His own.

2. But it is for our sake that He makes the request. His people are not with Him in the fall meaning of the word. When departing He said He would be with them, not that they should be with Him. Save in a few swift glimpses His Church has never seen Him since, save by the eye of faith.

3. Whilst we might be musing as to the glory of the place, our Lord attracts back our thoughts to Himself “that they may behold My glory.” This is twofold

II. THE STRENGTH OF THE PECULIAR EXPRESSION, “I WILL”

1. Whence has He that strong confidence on our account, sinners as we are?

2. What is the object of His intercession?

3. The prayer is granted. Whatsoever is necessary for our perfect deliverance from sin is here pledged, and hereafter there will be a most glorious answer when the saints, body and soul, are presented faultless by the Son to the Father.

III. THIS DEEP DESIRE AND STRONG INTERCESSION IS UTTERED IN OUR HEARING for our instruction and encouragement.

1. We are taught, by the connection of our text with the fact that Christ prays not for the world, how important it is to our peace that we should know that we are given of the Father to the Son. There is a terrible distinction. Our Lord says nothing further about those that are not His. They will not be with Him where He is. With whom then, and where?

2. With what transcendent honour are we here invested. To be the elect of God, the peculiar heritage of Christ--“Where I am there shall My servant be,” &c. With what ardour should we be inflamed to make ourselves worthy of this honour.

3. The prayer is our strong assurance while we watch and labour and pray.

4. Oar Lord permitted us to hear this prayer for our strong consolation in surrendering our friends to Him in death. (W. B. Pope, D. D.)

Christ’s unveiled glory

I. OF WHAT STATE OF MIND THIS IS THE EXPRESSION ON THE PART OF CHRIST.

1. It expresses the depth and intensity of His love to the Church He has redeemed. Montaigne says, “We hate those we injure”--certainly we love those whom we have blessed. Christ having redeemed us in this life is intent on blessing us in the next.

2. It turns on the principle that sympathy is most precious to the noblest natures. Christ could not think of the splendours of His throne without connecting them with His people.

3. It contains the idea of personal interest in them as precious property by special donation from the Father. What more valued than a father’s gift, especially when given as an expression of love and for a sublime purpose.

II. WHAT VIEWS IT FURNISHES OF THE FUTURE LIFE.

1. The happiness of heaven will be realized in the immediate presence and unveiled glory of Christ. The king makes the court, not the court the king.

2. Whatever displays are made in that life of the majesty of the Godhead, will be made in the Person of Christ. To all eternity He will be “Emanuel--God with us.” How transporting itwill be to find His glory that of “the Lamb that was slain!”

III. WHAT REFLECTIONS THE SUBJECT SHOULD AWAKEN.

1. Earnest desire to be one with Christ.

2. Adoring gratitude that He has invested us with this hope which cannot die.

3. A deep concern for the religious welfare of others. (S. T. Day.)

The glorification of the Church

I. ITS SIGNIFICANCE EXPLAINED.

1. Co-existence with Christ. Now He co-exists with the Church Matthew 18:20; Mat_28:20); then the Church will co-exist with Him Matthew 12:26; 1 Thessalonians 4:17). Now He comes down, then He will take us up. Now the place where they are together is the scene of the Church’s trials, conflicts, labours, discipline: then the place will be the house of many mansions, the scene of Christ’s exaltation and glory.

2. Communion with Christ. Christ and His Church have that here (1 John 1:3). Here we see Him, but not with open vision (1 Corinthians 13:12). There the vision will be unveiled and full (1 Corinthians 13:12; 1 John 3:2; Revelation 22:4). They shall behold His glory, not only its outward symbol--the throne, sceptre, angels, trumpets, &c.

but the eternal, perfect love of the Father to Him, and the glory which, moved by that love, the Father put upon Him when He constituted Him the Crown of redeemed humanity (Ephesians 1:22; Philippians 2:9-10; 1 Peter 3:22).

3. Conformity to Christ. This is realized here in part (2 Corinthians 4:18), there it will be complete (Romans 8:29; 1 John 3:2).

4. Co-partnership with Christ. Christ is here co-partner of the Church s sufferings (Hebrews 4:15); by and by we shall participate in His glory (verse 22; Revelation 3:21; 2 Timothy 2:12).

II. ITS CERTAINTY GUARANTEED.

1. By the “I will” of the Divine Servant. Having accomplished the work (verse 4) Christ was entitled to claim the stipulated reward--not merely to “ask” or “wish,” though that would have been enough. And as failure is impossible with reference either to God’s promise (Hebrews 5:13), or Christ’s reward (Isaiah 53:2), so certainly Christ’s believing people will eventually be glorified with Him in heaven.

2. By the “I will” of the Divine Son. As such Christ had power to bestow eternal life (verse 2), and so the ultimate glorification of the Church is seen.

III. ITS JUSTICE VINDICATED (verse 25, 26).

1. If the world is not glorified it is because it cannot be. Eternal righteousness forbids the glorification of such as know not the Father.

2. If the Church is glorified, it is because glory is the necessary outcome of grace. Lessons:

1. The blessedness of heaven.

2. The certainty of salvation.

3. The necessity of growing in knowledge.

4. The righteousness of the unbelieving world’s doom.

5. Grace the song of the glorified. (T. Whitelaw, D. D.)

Why they leave us

1. The prayer of the Saviour rises as it proceeds. He asked for His people that they might be preserved from the world, then that they might be sanctified, and then that they might be made manifestly one; and now He reaches His crowning point--that they may be with Him where He is, and behold His glory. That prayer is most after the Divine pattern which, like a ladder, rises round by round, until it loses itself in heaven.

2. This last step of our Lord’s prayer is not only above all the rest, but it is a longer step than any of the others. He here ascends, not from one blessing which may be enjoyed on earth, to higher, but mounts right away from all that is to that which is reserved for the eternal future.

3. Not only does it rise as to its subject, but it even ascends as to the place which the Intercessor appears to occupy. Has it not been so with yourselves in prayer, that you might have cried with Paul, “Whether in the body or out of the body, I cannot tell.”

4. Still the prayer rises, not only as to its matter and place, but in a higher style. Before, our Lord had asked and pleaded; but now He says, “Father, I will.” It is well not only to groan out of the dust as suppliant sinners, but to seek unto our Father in the spirit of adoption with the confidence of children, and then, with the promise of God in our hand, lay hold upon the covenant angel, and cry, “I will not let thee go, except thou bless me.” Importunity is a humble approach to this Divine “I will.”

I. Let us begin as our text begins with THE HOME-WORD--“Father.” Is it not the centre of living unity? If there is to be a family gathering and reunion, where should it be but in the father’s house?

1. What can be more right than that children should go home to their Father? From Him they came, to Him they owe their life, and should not this be the goal of their being, that they should at last dwell in His presence?

2. “Father!” why, it is a bell that rings us home. He who hath the Spirit of adoption feels that the Father draws him home, and he would fain run after Him. How intensely did Jesus turn to the Father!

3. This is the consummation which the First-born looks for, and to which all of us who are like Him are aspiring also, namely, that God may be all in all. Our Brother is gone; but we ask, “Where is He gone?” and when the answer comes, “He is gone to the Father,” all notion of complaint is over. To whom else should He go? A child may be happy at school, but he longs for the holidays. Is it merely to escape his lessons? Ask him, and he will tell you, “I want to go home to see my father.”

II. THE HOME IMPETUS. How shall the chosen get home to the Father. “I will,” said Jesus, “that they be with Me”; and with Him they must be. Examine the energy of this “I will,” and you will see that it hath the force of

1. An intercessory prayer. I cannot imagine our Lord’s interceding in vain. If He asks that we may be with Him where He is, He must assuredly have His request. You cannot hold your dying babe, &c.; for Jesus asks for it to be with Him. Will you come into competition with your Lord?

2. A testamentary bequest and appointment. No man who makes his will likes to have it frustrated. Our Saviour’s testament will assuredly be carried out in every jot and tittle.

3. Desire, resolve, and purpose. If Jesus saith, “I will,” then it is yours to say, “Not as I will, but as Thou wilt.”

III. THE HOME CHARACTER. “They also, whom Thou hast given Me.” The Greek is somewhat difficult to translate. There is here a something in the singular as well as persons in the plural. “Father, I will concerning that which thou hast given Me, that they may be with Me where I am.”

1. Our Lord looked upon those whom the Father gave Him as one--one body, one Church, one bride: He willed that as a whole the Church should be with Him where He is.

2. Then He looked again and saw each of the many individuals of whom the one Church is composed, and He prayed that each, that all of these, might be with Him and behold His glory. Jesus never so prays for the whole Church as to forget a single member; neither does He so pray for the members individually as to overlook the corporate capacity of the whole.

3. I feel glad that there is no sort of personal character mentioned here, but only--“Those whom Thou hast given Me.” It seems as if the Lord in His last moments was not so much looking at the fruit of grace as at grace itself; He did not so much note either the perfections or the imperfections of His people, but only the fact that they were His by the eternal gift of the Father. The Father gave them as a love-token and a means of His Son’s glorification. If I possess a love-token that some dear one has given me I may rightly desire to have it with me. Nobody can have such a right to your wedding-ring, good sister, as you have yourself, and are not Christ’s saints, as it were, a signet upon His finger, a token which His Father gave Him of His good pleasure in Him? Should they not be with Jesus where He is, since they are His crown jewels and His glory?

IV. THE HOME COMPANIONSHIP.

1. The nearness of the saints to Christ in glory--“that they may be with Me.” In heaven the saints will be nearer to Christ than the apostles were when they sat at the table with Him, or heard Him pray. “For ever with the Lord”--this is heaven.

2. They must occupy a place: that place will be where Jesus is. We are to be, not metaphorically and fancifully, but really, truly, literally with Jesus.

3. Notice the occupation of those who are with Jesus: “That they may behold My glory.” Love always pines for a partner in its joys. When I have been specially charmed with glorious scenery, I have felt myself saying, “How I wish that my dear wife could be here!” How unselfish it is on our Lord’s part to think Himself not fully glorified till we behold His glory! How unselfish He will make us also, since it will be our glory to see His glory! Who would keep a brother out of it an hour?

4. Observe the fellowship which exists in the glory land. “That they may behold My glory, which Thou hast given Me.” So when the Lord brings His people home, we shall be one with Him, and He one with the Father, and we also in Him one with the Father, so that we shall then find boundless glory in beholding the glory of our Lord and God.

V. THE HOME ATMOSPHERE. Love: “Thou lovedst Me before the foundation of the world.” Can you follow me in a great flight? There was a day before all days, when there was no day but the Ancient of Days. Oh the intensity of the Divine love of the Father to the Son! There was no universe, but God alone; and the whole of God’s omnipotence flowed forth in a stream of love to the Son, while the Son’s whole being remained eternally one with the Father by a mysterious essential union. Love is both the source and the channel, and the end of the Divine acting. Because the Father loved the Son He gave us to Him, and ordained that we should be with Him. Let our saintly ones go home if that is the design of their going. Since all comes of Divine love, and all sets forth Divine love, let them go to Him who loves them. Hold your friends lovingly, but be ready to yield them to Jesus. (C. H. Spurgeon.)

Eternal glory

I. THE OBJECTS OF THIS PRAYED. “That which Thou hast given to Me” and “they also.” But in what respects were this people given by the Father to the Son?

1. In the first instance, He gave them to Him in the everlasting covenant.

2. But, in the second instance, the Father gives them to His Son in the day of their espousals--in the day of their effectual calling. “All that the Father giveth Me,” saith Jesus, “shall come to Me” (John 6:37),--not all that the Father gave Me,--as if He were speaking merely of some transaction in the past,--but all that the Father giveth Me--referring to the day of their espousals to Christ. “Wherefore, brethren, give diligence to make your calling and election sure” (2 Peter 1:10). It is for souls, that are effectually called and justified, that Jesus prays that they may be with Him in glory.

II. THE MANNER AND SPIRIT OF THIS PRAYER. Jesus no longer says, “I pray” (John 17:9; Joh_17:15; Joh_17:20), but “I will.” Oh, what a wonderful prayer is this! We never read of any prayer like this, offered up by any saint on earth. Some of them, indeed, attained to great nearness to the Lord--such as Abraham, and Jacob, and Moses and David--and yet they never did, or ought to, use such language to God. And what shall we make of this prayer?

1. I think we may say, in the first instance, there is in it a beaming forth of His Divine glory, as the Eternal Son of God.

2. And surely this expression sets forth the reality and intensity of the Saviour’s love. It was in the exercise of infinite love that He laid down His life for them.

3. Further, we may well believe, that this is an expression of will, founded on acknowledged right. Jesus had the price of our redemption now in His hand, ready to lay it down.

4. And, as has often been remarked, this I will on the part of Christ is in perfect accord with the known will of His Father. “Father, I will,” says Christ; “and I will too,” re-echoes the voice of the Father. Oh, blessed harmony this between the will of Christ and the will of His Father!

5. But I apprehend, that this unique expression is to be explained by the unique character of the situation. Jesus is just about to lay down His life for them, and He now expresses His last will and testimony: “Father, My last will is.” It is truly His testimony which Jesus deposits in His Father’s hands.

III. WHAT THE BLESSINGS REALLY ARE, which Jesus thus asks for those that the Father gave Him: “That where I am, there they also may be with Me, that they may behold My glory which Thou hast given Me,” &c.

1. He asks that where He is, there they also may be with Him. Ah! yes, such is His love to them, that as He came from heaven to earth to save them, so He will never be at rest until He has them with Him where He is. And is not this heaven--its chiefest, choicest ingredient--to be where Christ is? (Philippians 1:23).

2. But why does He pray that they may be with Him where He is? How are they to be employed? “That they may behold My glory which Thou hast given Me.”

3. Notice here the object to be beheld--“My glory which Thou hast given to Me”--“My glory peculiarly and emphatically,--and yet My glory which Thou hast given to Me,”--not His essential glory as the Son of God viewed abstractly, and by itself; but the glory given to Him as Immanuel, God-man, Mediator. Oh, who can tell what glory now encircles Him, as the Son of Man exalted to the right hand of God? But did they not behold this glory already? Assuredly they did by faith. And it is indeed a solemn truth, that none shall behold His glory by sight in heaven that do not first behold it by faith on earth. Some beheld this glory before He came in the flesh (John 8:56; Joh_12:40). Some beheld it by faith while He tabernacled upon earth (John 1:14). And some behold it now, though He is in heaven, and they upon the earth (2 Corinthians 3:18). But the beholding mentioned in the text is something higher, nearer than all this. This is the beatific vision, to which they shall attain when He has gathered them home to be for ever with Himself. It is impossible to behold this glory and to remain a mere spectator of it. To behold it is to partake of it--to become a sharer with Him in His glory. Then shall be fulfilled the words: “And the glory which Thou gavest Me I have given them.” This is the height to which Jesus elevates His Church.

4. And one of the most interesting and delightful things connected with this glory, which they are to behold, will be to trace the source of it in the Father’s everlasting love: “The glory which Thou hast given Me, in that Thou lovedst Me.” The Father loved the Son with an everlasting love as His Son--His Only-Begotten Son. But He also loved Him with an everlasting love as Mediator. “Then I was by Him as one brought up with Him, and I was daily His delight” (Proverbs 8:30). Oh, surely it will be an eternal feast to the hearts of the redeemed in heaven to see the glorious unfoldings of the Father’s love towards their Covenant Head. Such, then, the two great blessings which Jesus here asks for the collective body of believers, viz., spiritual unity and eternal glory. (C. Ross, M. A.)

Thou lovedst Me before the foundation of the world.--The Unitarian conception of the Divine Unity being arithmetical, not dynamical, its advocates deny plurality of persons or hypostases in the Godhead. And yet they loudly proclaim the truth that God is love, a truth which most strongly urges on our acceptance the doctrine of plurality. Love always demands two at least--a subject and an object, one to love and another to be loved. If God is love, as we most emphatically believe, then He must have had some one from eternity to love. Who then is that one Himself? But self-love is no love, it is the denial of love. Who then? The Church answers--His Son, the brightness of His glory, and the express image of HisPerson. Plurality of persons must not, however, be confounded with plurality of Gods. When men are invited to Christ they are not enticed away from God, for Christ is with God; when they are called to worship Christ, they are not bidden to serve an idol, for Christ is God. (J. Cynddylan Jones, D. D.)

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Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "John 17:24". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/john-17.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

Father, I desire that they also whom thou hast given me be with me where I am, that they may behold my glory, which thou hast given me: for thou lovedst me before the foundation of the world.

Where I am ... Prophetically, Jesus was already at home with the Father when this prayer was uttered. See under John 14:1-3 where the same thought prevails. "Before the foundation of the world ..." See under John 17:5 and John 1:1-11. The eternal existence of Christ, his deity, incarnation, and visit to humanity as "the Dayspring from on high" (Luke 1:78) - these are all in view here. The ministry of Christ was but an interlude in the eternal life of that great "I AM" who was before Abraham was born and before all creation.

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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 17:24". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-17.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Father, I will that they also whom thou hast given me,.... Not all the world, but a select number; not apostles only, nor as such; nor believers, or as such, for as such they were not given to Christ; nor as considered in the effectual calling; but as the elect of God, and by that eternal act of his grace; when they were given to Christ as his children, as his spouse, as his church, as the sheep of his hand, as his portion, and to be preserved by him; which is known by their calling and conversion: the form in which these words are delivered, is not so much by way of entreaty, as demand; they are a declaration of Christ's will, in which he insists on it as his right, upon the foot of his purchase, and those covenant transactions which passed between him and his Father, on the behalf of those that were given to him: that they

be with me where I am; not where he was then, unless it may be meant of him as the omnipresent God, and as such then in heaven; though he rather designs where he should be as man, after his resurrection, and where the souls of saints are after death; and where they will be, soul and body, when raised again; and which is desirable both to Christ, and to his people; this was the joy that was set before him, and what they comfort one another with, that they shall be for ever with him:

that they may behold my glory which thou hast given me; not the simple abstract glory of his deity; which, as it was not given to him, is not to be seen by them; but his glory as Mediator: this was seen, though imperfectly by some, in the days of his flesh; and in the glass of the Gospel, a believer now has some views of it, and by faith sees, knows, and is assured that Christ is glorified in heaven; but hereafter the saints in their own persons, and with their own eyes, shall see him as he is, and appear in glory with him; which sight of his glory will be near, and not at a distance, appropriating and assimilating, rejoicing, satisfying, and for ever:

for thou lovedst me before the foundation of the world; this is mentioned both as a reason why such a glory was given him, because of his Father's early love to him as Mediator; and as an argument why he might expect to be heard and answered, because of the interest he had in his affections, which had been strongly towards him, even from everlasting; and because the persons he asks, or rather demands these things for, shared in the same ancient love.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on John 17:24". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-17.html. 1999.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

I will (τελωthelō). Perfect identity of his will with that of the Father in “this moment of spiritual exaltation” (Bernard), though in Gethsemane Jesus distinguishes between his human will and that of the Father (Mark 14:36).

Where I am (οπου ειμι εγωhopou eimi egō). That is heaven, to be with Jesus (John 12:26; John 13:36; John 14:3; Romans 8:17; 2 Timothy 2:11.).

That they may behold
(ινα τεωρωσινhina theōrōsin). Another purpose clause with ιναhina and the present active subjunctive of τεωρεωtheōreō “that they may keep on beholding,” the endless joy of seeing Jesus “as he is” (1 John 3:2) in heaven.

Before the foundation of the world
(προ καταβολης κοσμουpro katabolēs kosmou). This same phrase in Ephesians 1:4; 1 Peter 1:20 and six other times we have καταβολη κοσμουkatabolē kosmou (Matthew 25:34; Luke 11:50; Hebrews 4:3; Hebrews 9:26; Revelation 13:8; Revelation 17:8). Here we find the same pre-incarnate consciousness of Christ seen in John 17:5.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 17:24". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-17.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

They - whom ( οὓς )

The best texts read ὃ , that which. The construction is similar to that in John 17:2, “that He should give eternal life,” etc. Like πᾶν , all, in that passage, that which here refers to the body of believers taken collectively.

I will ( θέλω )

See on Matthew 1:19.

My glory

The glory which is mine.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on John 17:24". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/john-17.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Father, I will that they also, whom thou hast given me, be with me where I am; that they may behold my glory, which thou hast given me: for thou lovedst me before the foundation of the world.

Here he returns to the apostles.

I will — He asks, as having a right to be heard, and prays, not as a servant, but a Son: that they may behold my glory - Herein Is the happiness of heaven, 1 John 3:2.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on John 17:24". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/john-17.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

Father, I desire that they also whom thou hast given me be with me where I am, that they may behold my glory1, which thou hast given me: for thou lovedst me before the foundation of the world.

  1. That they may behold my glory. While Jesus prays that his disciples may enter the heavenly state, that state is not expressed as the end desired. He wishes them to be in that state that they may behold his glory. The glory of Christ is his Sonship, and the love which accompanies that relationship. To behold this is the height of spiritual exultation. To know God is life eternal, and to behold God is joy ineffable. God is truly beheld subjectively. We must be like him to see him as he is (1 John 3:2). The second petition of Jesus, therefore, in no way savors of a vainglorious desire that his disciples may behold him to lead them to admire him, but a wish that they may participate in the heavenly state, and know the Sonship of Jesus and all its attendant blessedness by, in some measure, participating in it.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 17:24". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-17.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Where I am; am to be.

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Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on John 17:24". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/john-17.html. 1878.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Хочу, чтобы там, где Я. Хотеть здесь означает желать. Ибо это слова не заповедующего, но молящегося. Смысл же может быть двояким. Или таким, что Христос хочет насладить учеников Своим внешним присутствием, или таким, что Бог должен привести их в небесное царство, в которое Он войдет прежде них. Видеть славу некоторые толкуют как обладание славой, причащение к славе, которую имеет Христос. Другие толкуют иначе: это означает чувствовать опытом веры, что такое Христос и какова Его сила. Я же, взвесив прочие мнения, думаю, что речь идет о совершенном блаженстве праведных. Христос как бы говорит, что Его желание удовлетворится лишь тогда, когда они также будут приняты на небо. К этому же я отношу и лицезрение славы. Ученики и тогда видели славу Христову, но так, как человек, запертый в чулане, видит через щель слабый и тусклый свет. Теперь же по желанию Христа они должны преуспеть настолько, чтобы открыто наслаждаться на небесах Его сиянием. В итоге, Он просит, чтобы Отец привел их к полному видению Его славы путем постоянного и неуклонного развития.

Потому что возлюбил Меня. Это также лучше подходит лицу Посредника, чем простому божеству Христову. Весьма грубо звучало бы, что Отец возлюбил Свою премудрость. Однако контекст приводит нас к другому пониманию. Нет сомнения: Христос, желая, чтобы апостолы соединились с Ним и видели славу Его царства, говорил от лица Главы Церкви. Теперь же Он указывает и на причину – на Отчую любовь. Он был возлюблен постольку, поскольку был назначен Искупителем мира. Этой любовью Отец возлюбил Его прежде создания мира, дабы в Нем возлюбить и Своих избранных.

 

 

 

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 17:24". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-17.html. 1840-57.

Frédéric Louis Godet - Commentary on Selected Books

Ver. 24. "Father, my will is that those whom thou hast given me be with me where I am, that they may behold my glory which thou hast given me, for thou lovedst me before the foundation of the world."

Perfect unity is the last step before the goal of perfect glory. The repetition of the invocation Father, John 17:24-25, indicates the increasing urgency with which Jesus prays, as He draws nearer the end. The reading ὃ δέδωκας, "that which thou hast given me," is probably the true one; it brings out the unity of the believers, that perfect ἕν which the body of the elect will form (John 17:23).— θέλω : Jesus no longer says, I pray, but I will! This expression is found nowhere else on His lips; it is ordinarily explained by saying that the Son expresses Himself thus, because He feels Himself fully in accord on this point with the Father. But was not this the case in general in all His prayers! This unique expression must be in harmony with the unique character of the situation. And the unique point in this latter is that it is a question of Jesus as dying. It is His testament which Jesus here places in the hands of His Father, and, as the expression is, His last will.

All that which Jesus has just asked for them had for its aim to render them fit for the immediate beholding of His glory, from the very moment of their death (John 14:3). There is no question here of the Parousia, as Weiss thinks. The sphere of this divine manifestation is at once inward and heavenly.— Meyer thinks that the glory, of which Jesus says that the Father has given it to Him, cannot be His divine glory before the incarnation, and must designate His glory after His exaltation, and He sees in the following words: for thou lovedst me before,...the ground on which God thus glorifies Jesus. But the ground of the exaltation of Jesus is quite differently described, not only by Paul (Philippians 2:9-11), but also by John himself, John 10:17, John 13:32, John 15:10 : it is His perfect obedience even to death and even to the death of the cross.

The ὅτι therefore means: in that, and serves to explain wherein this glory of the Son consists: it is in having been the eternal object of the Father"s love. Is there any glory to be compared with this? The word given may be incompatible with a certain conception of the divine Trinity; it is not so with that of John, which includes as a necessary element the relation of subordination between the Son and the Father; comp. John 1:1 (with God); John 1:18 (in the bosom of the Father);John 5:26 ("it has been givenhim to have life in himself"), etc. The words: before the foundation of the world, imply eternity, for the world includes all that which has come into existence. This saying of Jesus is that which leads us farthest into the divine depths. It shows Christian speculation on what path it must seek the solution of the relations of the Trinity; love is the key of this mystery. And as this love is eternal, and consequently has no more an end than it has had a beginning, it may one day become for believers the permanent object of an immediate contemplation, through which they will find themselves initiated into the mystery of the essence of the Son and of His eternal generation. Far more; as, by the complete community which the Son has succeeded in establishing between them and Him, they are the objects of a similar love to that of which the Son is the object, they will find themselves thus introduced into the eternal movement of the divine life itself. This appears from the word behold. One does not behold a fact of this order without being in some manner associated with it. Here is the height to which Jesus elevates the Church. After having drawn His spouse from the midst of a world sunk in evil, He introduces her into the sphere of the divine life.

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Godet, Frédéric Louis. "Commentary on John 17:24". "Frédéric Louis Godet - Commentary on Selected Books". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsc/john-17.html.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

CHRIST’S WISH FOR HIS PEOPLE

‘Father, I will that they also whom Thou hast given Me be with Me where I am; that they may behold My glory.’

John 17:24

The truth that men are judged by their desires finds its highest illustration in Jesus. The perfectness of His wishes. This is one of Christ’s wishes. What does it mean? What would be the effect of its fulfilment? A prayer is merely a wish turned Godward. Christ looked for the fulfilment of His wishes, not to Himself and not to the things about Him, but to His Father; and so in His prayer we have simply the utterance Godward of what He was desiring in His heart.

I. This wish was spoken at Christ’s Last Supper with His disciples.—It is an expression of the Saviour’s affection for His disciples, His dread of being separated from them. When friend is going away from friend, how naturally the wish springs up into words, ‘Oh, if I could only take you with me!’ These primary emotions do exist in Jesus, the proof-marks of His true humanity, the patterns for all humanity; but they are deeper and richer things in Him than in ordinary men, in proportion to the depth and richness of His human nature and the Divinity that was mingled with it. Thus, then, we understand Christ’s longing for the companionship of His disciples. He wanted them to be with Him. That wish of His must have run through all the scale of companionship; but it must have completed itself in the desire that they should be like Him, that they should have His character, that in the obedience and communion of God, where He abode, they should abide with Him. I do not think that we can tell how much it signifies, this wish of Jesus, in its lower meaning of physical companionship. I am sure it does mean something. I am sure that in the Bible something is promised, some close perpetual association of the souls of Christ’s redeemed to Him, which, over and above the likeness which is to come between their souls and His, shall correspond in some celestial way to that close, visible, tangible propinquity with which they sat by one another at the table in the upper chamber. The ‘seeing His face,’ the ‘walking with Him in white’ in heaven, are not wholly figures.

II. He wants them to be with Him, ‘that they may behold His glory.’—Before the words can be cut entirely free from low associations and soar into the high, pure meaning which belongs to them, we must remember what Christ’s glory is which He wants us to see. Its essence, the heart and soul of it, is His grace and goodness. What outward splendour may clothe Christ eternally we cannot know. But this we are sure of, that the glory of God must issue from and consist in the goodness of God, not in His power. It is the very purpose of religion, it is the battle that Christianity has been fighting with the standards of the world for all these centuries, to make men know that power without goodness is not really glorious. In Him, too, nothing but goodness can be really glorious in the eyes of moral creatures. His power is the emphasis set upon His goodness; the brilliant light thrown through the perfect window, showing the window’s glory, not its own. It is the prerogative of our morality that only in a moral character can it discover the glory that shall call out its fullest adoration. It is Christ’s goodness, then, that He would have His people see. In various words, under various figures, Christ is the intercessor, always offering prayers for men; but all His prayers resolve themselves into the same wish; all are asking for the one same thing. It is always that men become saved from sin, that His goodness might come to us and we become good. There is something very impressive, I think, about this, as it becomes more and more plain to us. I hear God at work everywhere on the lives of men. Wherever I go I hear men answering to some touch of His. They may not know that it is His touch which they are answering; but one who believes in Him knows that these things about us are not all doing themselves, but He does them.

III. Christ asked His Father simply for this, that those whom He loved might come to Him in spiritual likeness.—We use still, in our religious talk, the words which express what Christ desired, but too often they have acquired some small meaning and degenerated into cant. We talk about a man being ‘far from Christ.’ Men mean by that too often something technical, something narrow; the not having undertaken certain ceremonies, or passed through certain experiences. But how much the words really mean. What a terrible thing it is to be really ‘far from Christ!’ To be far from purity is to be impure. To be far from spirituality is to be sensual. To go away from the light is to go into the outer darkness. Not to be ‘with Him where He is’ is to be away from Him where He is not, where sin is and the misery that belongs to sin. And then that other phrase, which we use so often, ‘Coming nearer and nearer to Christ,’ we say; that does not mean creeping into a refuge where we can be safe. It means becoming better and better men; repeating His character more and more in ours. The only true danger is sin, and so the only true safety is holiness. What a sublime ambition! The dearest and noblest being that our souls can dream of stands before us and says, ‘Come unto Me’; stands over us and prays for us, ‘Father, bring them where I am.’

—Bishop Phillips Brooks.

Illustration

‘Bunyan’s words are worth quoting. The immortal dreamer says: “Now, just as the gates were opened to let in the men, I looked in after them, and behold the city shone like the sun; the streets also were paved with gold, and in them walked many men, with crowns on their heads, palms in their heads, and golden harps, to sing praises withal. There were also them that had wings, and they answered one another without intermission, saying, ‘Holy, holy, holy is the Lord.’ And, after that, they shut up the gates, which, when 1 had seen, I wished myself among them,” “I wished myself among them.” I marvel not at that wish; it was realised in Bunyan’s case when he entered into the joy of his Lord. Ah! I dare say many a burdened heart echoes that wish. “I wish myself among them. Here I am tossed about with conflict, and sin, and fear. Oh, that I were yonder!” But, hush! God’s time is best. And be very sure “Christ won’t be in glory and leave you behind.”’

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Nisbet, James. "Commentary on John 17:24". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/john-17.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

24 Father, I will that they also, whom thou hast given me, be with me where I am; that they may behold my glory, which thou hast given me: for thou lovedst me before the foundation of the world.

Ver. 24. Father, I will, &c.] Every word is full of life and joy. I would not (saith Mr Baxter) for all the world that one verse had been left out of the Bible. And again the same author elsewhere saith, there is more worth in those four chapters, John 14:1-31; John 15:1-27; John 16:1-33; John 17:1-26, than in all the books in the world besides. (Saint’s Everlasting Rest.)

Be with me, where I am] It is part of Christ’s joy that we shall be in the place where he is. He will not therefore be long without us. David is sent by God to Hebron to be crowned: he will not go up alone, but takes with him all his men, with all their households. They shall take such part as himself, notwithstanding their recent rebellion at Ziklag. So dealeth the Lord Christ with all his, and this should digest all their sorrows. Christ will not be happy alone; as a tender father, he can enjoy nothing if his children may not have part with him.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 17:24". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-17.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

John 17:24

Christ's Wish for Man

This must always be the first joy of any really good life, its first joy and its first anxiety at once, the desire that others should enter into it. Indeed, here is a test of a man's life. Can you say: "I wish you were like me?" Can you take your purposes and standards of living, and quietly, deliberately, wish for all those who are nearest to you that they should be their standards and purposes too? Do not consent to be anything which you would not wish to ask the soul that is dearest to you to be. Be nothing which you would not wish all the world to be.

I. Thus, then, we understand Christ's longing for the companionship of His disciples. He wanted them to be with Him. That wish of His must have run through all the scale of companionship which we have traced, but it must have completed itself in the desire that they should be like Him, that they should have His character, that in the obedience of God, where He abode, they should abide with Him.

II. He wants His disciples to be with Him, "that they may behold My glory." Before these words can be cut entirely free from low associations and soar into the high pure meaning which belongs to them, we must remember what Christ's glory is which He desires us to see. Its essence, the heart and soul of it, must be His goodness. It is Christ's goodness then that He would have His people see. Think for a moment what prospects that wish of our Lord opens. Only by growth in goodness can His goodness open itself to us. What is He praying for then? Is it not that which we traced before in the first part of His prayer, the same exactly, that we might be like Him? So only can we see Him. It is His glory that He wants us to see; but back of that, He wants us to be such men and women that we can see His glory. The only true danger is sin, and so the only true safety is holiness. What a sublime ambition. How it takes our vague, half-felt wishes and fills them with reality and strength, when the moral growth, which makes a man complete, is put before us, not abstractly, but in this picture of the dearest and noblest being that our souls can dream of, standing before us and saying to us: "Come unto Me," standing over us and praying for us, "Father, bring them where I am."

Phillips Brooks, Sermons, p. 299.


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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on John 17:24". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/john-17.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

John 17:24. Father, I will, &c.— See John 17:5. "Not only with respect to those apostles whom thou hast particularly given me, but also to those in every age and country, who shall sincerely and perseveringly believe in and obey me, my will is, that, after their work here is over, they may be with me in heaven, whither I am going, (John 17:11.) That they may behold thefull splendor of my glory, and be made happy with seeing me so, and enjoying me for ever. (1 John 3:2.) For thou lovedst me before the foundation of the world. As thou lovedst me before I came into the world, nay, even before the world was, that is to say, from all eternity, I shall not be less the object of thy love now that I have accomplished the work which thou gavest me to perform. My disciples, therefore, in beholding the glory which I shall enjoy with thee in my glorified humanity,will be completely happy, both as it will shew them how much thou approvest my design, and how infinitely happy I am made thereby,and by the fruition and communication of thy glory." See John 17:26.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on John 17:24". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/john-17.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Our Saviour had prayed for his disciples' sanctification before, here he prays for their glorification:

1. That they may be where he is; now Christ is with them in his ordinances, in his word, and at his table; ere long they shall be with him as his friends, as his spouse, as his companions, in his kingdom.

2. That they may be with him where he is; that is more than the former; a blind man may be where the sun is, but not with the sun, because he doth not enjoy the light and benefit of it. To be with Christ where he is, imports union and communion with him.

3. That being with him where he is, they may behold his glory; that is, to see it, and everlastingly to possess and enjoy it.

Learn, 1. That all those that are given to Christ as his charge, and as his reward, shall certainly come to heaven to him; Father, I will that they be with me; because I have merited that they should be with me; I will that they behold my glory, because I have purchased it at so dear a rate.

Learn, 2. That the work and employment of the saints in heaven chiefly consist in seeing and enjoying Christ's glory; for it will be a possessive sight; the language of every look will be, "This happiness is mine, this glory is mine."

3. That the top and height of the saints' happiness in heaven consists in this, that they shall be with Christ; Father, I will that they may be with me, to behold my glory.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on John 17:24". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/john-17.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

24. ὅ δέδωκάς μοι] The neuter has a peculiar solemnity, uniting the whole Church together as one gift of the Father to the Son: see ch. John 6:39, note. Then the κἀκεῖνοι resolves it into the great multitude whom no man can number, and comes home to the heart of every individual believer with inexpressibly sweet assurance of an eternity with Christ.

θέλω is not the θέλω of ch. John 12:21 : 1 Corinthians 7:7, but more like that of Mark 6:25,—an expression of will founded on acknowledged right: compare διατίθεμαι, Luke 22:29.

Compare also the θέλω and ὃ δέδωκ. μοι, with ch. John 5:21; John 6:44.

ὅπου εἰμὶ ἐγώ] i.e. in the glorified state: see ch. John 12:26 and note: also ch. John 14:3.

ἵνα θεωρ.] This is the completion of John 17:22,—the open beholding of His glory, spoken of 1 John 3:2, which shall be coincident with our being changed into His perfect image.

θεωρ. is to behold and partake—the very case supposes it. No mere spectator could behold this glory. See Romans 8:17 end, and 2 Corinthians 3:18.

ὅτι ἠγ. με.…] The most glorious part of this sight of glory will be to behold the whole mystery of redemption unfolded in the glory of Christ’s Person,—and to see how, before the being of the creature, that eternal Love was, which gave the glory to Christ of which all creation is but the exponent.

On κατ. κόσ. see reff.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on John 17:24". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/john-17.html. 1863-1878.

Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae

DISCOURSE: 1716

CHRIST’S INTERCESSION

John 17:24. Father, I will that they also, whom thou hast given me, be with me where I am; that they may behold my glory, which thou hast given me.

THERE is an height, and depth, and length, and breadth in the love of Christ, which can never be explored. His assumption of our sinful nature, and his submission to the accursed death of the cross for our sake, will fill the universe with wonder to all eternity. Next to those unparalleled instances of his love, we cannot but notice the concern which he expressed for his people’s welfare in the last hours of his life. Well did he know all that was coming upon him; yet instead of being occupied, as might have been expected, about his own sufferings, he was intent only on the salvation of others. Having prayed in the hearing of his Disciples that they, and all his followers to the end of the world, might be preserved and sanctified, he adds the petition which we have now read; in discoursing on which we shall consider,

I. The subject-matter of the petition—

The manner in which it is expressed is worthy of notice.

[It is generally considered as an authoritative demand, which he made in consequence of the right he had in them, and with a more especial view to their comfort. Certain it is that, as his people had been “given him by the Father,” and as he was now about to confirm his title to them by the surrender of his own life in their stead, he might justly claim the blessings which he asked in their behalf. But the same expression is elsewhere used where nothing more is intended than great earnestness in the request [Note: Mark 6:25; Mark 10:35.]; and this seems to be the real import of the words before us. Our Lord had come down from heaven to rescue his people from destruction; nor could he endure the thought of returning thither without first securing them to himself as the trophies of his victory. Hence was there an extraordinary emphasis laid on this petition, because, if that should not be granted, all which he had done and suffered for them would be in vain.]

The petition itself represents the final glorification of all his Disciples—

[Jesus was now going to his Father in heaven. He was already in heaven as to his divine nature; but his human nature also was speedily to be removed thither. A short separation from them was necessary, in order that he might prosecute his mediatorial work in heaven, and they discharge their apostolic office on earth. But he had promised that, “where he was, there should also his servants be [Note: John 12:26.];” and that, as he was going to prepare mansions for them, so he would surely come again and receive them to himself, that they might be with him for ever [Note: John 14:3.]. Besides, he had already given them a glimpse of his glory, which they had seen through the veil of his flesh [Note: John 1:14. 2 Peter 1:16-17.]; and taught them to expect that what they had beheld in the dawn, should be revealed to them in its meridian splendour [Note: Matthew 19:28.]. These expectations he would never disappoint. Hence in his intercession he gave them an additional assurance, that they should in due time possess the promised bliss. At the same time he taught them by his example, that the promises of God were not to supersede, but to encourage prayer: and that, however secure they might feel themselves in knowing the eternal purposes of God, they were never to relax their earnestness in prayer till every decree of God should be finally accomplished [Note: To the same effect see Jeremiah 29:11-12 and Ezekiel 36:37.].]

As we cannot conceive any petition more important, we shall proceed to mark,

II. The blessedness of those who are interested in it—

There are two things suggested for their comfort,

1. Their security in this world—

[The saints are frequently, especially in this intercessory prayer, spoken of as “given to Christ by the Father.” And when were they given him, but from all eternity [Note: Ephesians 1:4.]? Nor was it merely in his personal, but also in his official character, as the head and representative of his elect, that “the Father loved Christ from before the foundation of the world [Note: Isaiah 42:1.].” Can we suppose then that they were given to Christ, and that it was left uncertain whether he should ever enjoy the gift? Has not our Lord himself repeatedly declared, that they should never perish, and that none should ever pluck them out of his hand [Note: John 10:28-29.]? Further, it was for them that Jesus prayed; and “we know that him the Father heareth always.” For them too he is carrying on his intercession in heaven; and is not he an all-prevailing Advocate? yea, is not his intercession for them a ground of assurance, that he both can, and will, save them to the uttermost [Note: Hebrews 7:25.]? “Fear not then, little flock, for it is your Father’s good pleasure to give you the kingdom [Note: Luke 12:32.].” Rejoice in your security, and know that “having loved you, our Lord will love you to the end [Note: John 13:1.]” having “bought you with a price,” he will never suffer himself to be deprived of “his purchased possession.”]

2. Their felicity in the world to come—

[It is the glory of Christ which irradiates heaven, and makes it what it is; “the glory of God doth lighten it, and the Lamb is the light thereof.” Hence the Apostle speaks of “being with Christ,” and “being present with the Lord,” as terms equivalent with the glorification of his soul: yea, he mentions it as that which conveys the most consoling idea of heaven [Note: 1 Thessalonians 4:18.]. Now if we only consider what unspeakable joy arises from a view of Christ, through the medium of the written word, we may well conceive that an immediate vision of his unveiled glory constitutes the felicity of heaven. And this, believer, is thy portion: it is reserved for thee, and thou for it. Thou shalt behold him face to face [Note: 1 Corinthians 13:12.]. Though now thou canst not endure the splendour of the meridian sun, thou shalt soon have thine organs of vision strengthened to gaze on him, who is “the brightness of the Father’s glory and the express image of his person.” What felicity must this be! If the Queen of Sheba, enraptured with the glory of Solomon, exclaimed, “Happy are thy men, happy are these thy servants who stand before thee, and that hear thy wisdom [Note: 1 Kings 10:8.]” what must be the happiness of those who behold “the Lamb upon his throne,” and enjoy that beatific vision without weariness or intermission? O that we might all aspire after this honour, and that not one of us might ever come short of it!]

Application—

1. Let every one of us now inquire, Am I interested in this prayer?

[This surely is an important inquiry: it is, in fact, to ask, Shall I behold my Saviour’s face with joy, or shall I behold it only at an unapproachable distance, a wretched outcast from heaven, an hopeless monument of God’s displeasure? Let us enter into this inquiry with fear and trembling. But it may be asked, Is it not presumptuous to attempt an answer to such an inquiry? for who can specify the persons that have been. given to Christ? who hath looked into the book of God’s decrees, that he shall undertake to answer such a question as this? We answer, that the question may easily be resolved, without presuming to pry into the secrets of God. The point may be determined by asking, Have I given myself to Christ? Have I as a guilty, helpless, and undone creature, given up myself to Christ, to be washed in his blood, and to be sanctified by his Spirit? Have I done this repeatedly, with deep humiliation, with fervent prayer, with faith unfeigned? If our consciences bear witness that we have indeed done this, then do we know that the Father gave us to him from all eternity; for “we love him because he first loved us [Note: 1 John 4:19.];” and we chose him only in consequence of our having before been chosen of him [Note: John 15:16.]. Hither then let our researches be directed; nor let us ever conclude ourselves his, till we have shewn ourselves willing and desirous to he his.]

2. Let us all live as those who are looking for a speedy answer to it—

[How worthless would all earthly vanities appear, if we were looking daily for the glory that shall be revealed! and how effectually would death be disarmed of its sting! Methinks, we should be “looking for and hasting to the coming of that day:” we should be “desiring to depart, that we may be with Christ,” and that “mortality,” with all its cares or pleasures, “may be swallowed up of life,” Let this be your state, brethren, and you have nothing to fear. Only maintain habitual fellowship with Christ here, and doubtless ye shall be with him hereafter. Be daily surveying his glory now, and you shall assuredly behold it in the world to come. His prayer was offered not for his immediate Disciples only, but “for all who should believe on him through their word.” Be ye of this number, and all the glory of heaven shall be yours.]

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Simeon, Charles. "Commentary on John 17:24". Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/shh/john-17.html. 1832.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

John 17:24. What He has already bestowed on them, but as yet as a possession of hope (John 17:22), He wills ( θέλω) that they may also partake of in reality. He does not merely wish it (against Beza, Calvin, B. Crusius, Tholuck, Ewald), but the Son prays in the consciousness of the ἐξουσία bestowed on Him by the Father according to John 17:2, for the communication of eternal life to His own. This consciousness is that of the most intimate confidence and clearest accord with the Father. Previously He had said ἐρωτῶ; “nunc incrementum sumit oratio,” Bengel. The idea of the last will, however (Godet), is not to be imported here.

The relative definition is placed first emphatically, because justifying the θέλω according to its contents. This is neutral ( , see the critical notes), whereby the persons ( ἐκεῖνοι, i.e. the disciples and all believers, John 17:20) are designated in abstracto, according to their category (comp. John 17:2; John 6:37), and the moment of δέδωκάς μοι, which is a motive cause to the granting of the prayer, becomes more prominent in and of itself.

ἵνα] Purpose of θέλω (they should, etc.), and therewith its contents; see on Luke 6:31.

ὅπου εἰμὶ ἐγὼ, κἀκεῖνοι, κ. τ. λ.] shall be realized at the Parousia.(200) See on John 14:3, also on ἀναστήσω αὐτὸ, κ. τ. λ., John 6:39.

θεωρῶσι] behold, experimentally, and with personal participation, as συνδοξασθέντες, Romans 8:17; Romans 8:29, and συμβασιλεύοντες, 2 Timothy 2:12. The opposite: behold death, John 8:51.(201) Against the interpretation that the beholding of the δόξα of Christ in itself (its reflection, as it were) constitutes blessedness (Olshausen, comp. Chrysostom and Euth. Zigabenus), John 17:22 testifies, although it is also essentially included in it, 1 John 3:2; Hebrews 12:14.

ἣν ἔδωκάς μοι, ὅτι, κ. τ. λ.] Further added in childlike feeling of gratitude to τὴν ἐ΄ήν, and that proleptically (comp. εἰμί), because the Lord is on the point of entering into this δόξα (John 17:1), as if He had already received it (comp. John 17:22): whom Thou gavest me, because (motive of the ἐδωκ.) Thou lovedst me before the foundation of the world ( πρὸ κατ. κ. not belonging to ἔδωκ. ΄., as Paulus and B. Crusius think). The δόξα of Christ, as the λόγος ἄσαρκος (John 17:5), was, according to the mode of view and expression of the N. T., not one imparted to Him from love, but in virtue of the ontologically Trinitarian relation to the Father,(202) that which pertained with metaphysical necessity to the Son in the unity of the divine nature, the μορφὴ θεοῦ, which He as θεὸς λόγος, John 1:1, had, being from eternity eternally with the Father (John 17:5); whereas the δόξα here intended is in His exaltation after the completion of His work, since it concerned His entire person, including its human side, that given to Him by the Father from love (Philippians 2:9), from that love, however, which did not first originate in time, but was already cherished by the Father toward the Son before the foundation of the world. That δόξα possessed by Jesus before His incarnation, to which for the most part (as still Luthardt, Ebrard, Hengstehberg) reference is wrongly made, whereby, according to John 17:5, ἔδωκας would have to be conceived of as brought about through the generation of the ΄ονογενής, was the purely divine; that given to Him through His exaltation is indeed the same, into which He now again has entered, but because it is the glory of the λόγος ἔνσαρκος, divine-human in eternal consummation (Philippians 2:9). Comp. on John 17:5; John 1:14. Nowhere in the N. T. is the premundane δόξα of the Son designated as given to Him (Philippians 2:6; Colossians 1:15; 2 Corinthians 8:9), although this would be imaginable in and of itself as an eternal self-communication of Fatherly love (comp. Brückner and Ebrard).(203) Further, it is strangely incorrect that the δόξα, which the Father has given to the Son, has been explained here differently from that in John 17:22.

The love of the Father to the Son before the foundation of the world implies the personal pre-existence of the latter with God, but is not reconcilable with the idea of the pre-temporal ideal existence which He has had in God, as the archetype of humanity. This in answer to Beyschlag, p. 87, who considers the relation as analogous to the eternal election of grace, Ephesians 1:4, Romans 8:29; which is not appropriate, since the election of grace concerns those as yet not in existence, namely, future believers, whom God προέγνω as future. The Son, however, whom He loved, must personally exist with the Father, since it was in Christ that the motive already lay for the election of grace (see on Ephesians 1:4). Comp. also on John 17:5. To suppose that God, according to the present passage, had loved His own ideal of humanity before the foundation of the world, the idea consequently of His own thought, is an idea without any analogy in the N. T., and we thereby arrive at an anthropopathic self-love, as men form to themselves an ideal, and are glad to attain it.

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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on John 17:24". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/john-17.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

John 17:24. οὓς, whom) He returns to the apostles: in John 17:25, these.— θέλω, I will) He had said in John 17:9; John 17:15; John 17:20, ἐρωτῶ, I ask; now His language assumes an increase in force. It is to be interpreted, I will; for, I would desire, is too weak a rendering. Jesus asks with the right of a claim, and demands with confidence, as the Son, not a servant. Comp. Psalms 2:8, “Ask of Me, and I shall give Thee,” etc.; Mark 10:35, James and John say, “Master, we would ( θέλομεν) that Thou shouldest do for us whatsoever we shall desire;” John 6:25, the daughter of Herodias to Herod, “I will ( θέλω) that thou give me forthwith.” [In a different tone from what He used in behalf of Himself at the Mount of Olives, Matthew 26:39, “Let this cup pass from Me: nevertheless not as I will, but as Thou wilt.”]— θεωρῶσι) that they may behold, viz. in enjoying it.— πρὸ, before) Construe with, Thou lovedst Me. The economy of salvation flows from eternity to eternity. Between eternity and the foundation of the world no intervening period is admissible (is given). For in the beginning God created, etc. [John 17:5].

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 17:24". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-17.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Here our Saviour wills his disciples eternal life; or rather prays to his Father, that he would preserve his disciples unto, and at last bestow upon them, eternal life and salvation; so as the phrase,

whom thou hast given me, is not to be restrained to the apostles, but to be extended to all those who, belonging to the election of grace, shall hereafter be made heirs of glory, and have everlasting life and happiness. This he expresses under the notion of being with him where he is, as John 14:3; which is called a being ever with the Lord, 1 Thessalonians 4:17; and certainly this is the highest happiness, to be where the Son of God is.

That they may behold my glory, is the same thing with, that they may be made partakers of my glory: as to see death, is, in Scripture phrase, to die; and to see life, is to live; so, to behold the glory of God, is to be glorified.

For, saith our Saviour, thou lovedst me before the foundation of the world, both as thy only begotten Son, and as the person in whom thou hast chosen all them, and whom thou hast set apart to be the Mediator between God and man; and therefore I know that thou wilt glorify me, and that thou wilt in this thing hear my prayers, and glorify them also, whom thou hast given to me to be redeemed by my blood.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 17:24". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-17.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

были со Мною Речь идет о небесах, где можно видеть принадлежащую Иисусу полную славу (ср. ст. 5). Когда-нибудь верующие не только увидят Его славу, но и разделят ее (Флп. 3:20, 21; 1Ин. 3:2). А до того времени мы принимаем в ней участие в духе (2Кор. 3:18).

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on John 17:24". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/john-17.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

With me where I am; in heaven. The death of Christians is in answer to the prayers of Christ, and for the purpose of removing them to the perfect and everlasting enjoyment of his presence in heaven.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on John 17:24". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/john-17.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

24.I will—Not I pray, nor I ask; but this is my will. He speaks as a Son returned to his Father’s house, who tells, in loving confidence, how he will have things. He will bring his beloved comrades with him, that they may see what a glorious Prince he is, and in what a glorious palace

That they may behold my glory—And themselves participate and possess it, just as seeing the kingdom of God is sharing it. (John 3:3.) So, beholding his glory, we are all changed into the same image from glory to glory. (2 Corinthians 3:18.)

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 17:24". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-17.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

“Father, that which you have given me, I will that where I am they also may be with me, that they may behold my glory which you have given me, for you loved me before the foundation of the world.”

‘That which you have given me’. This refers to the gift from the Father to the Son of His true people, seen as one. (Although some authorities have ‘those whom you have given me’). In them will be fulfilled all the spiritual blessing of Ephesians 1:3-14, for it is to this that He has called and chosen them. They are ‘His own people’ set apart to reveal His excellencies (1 Peter 2:9), chosen by God, set apart and precious, and secure in His hand (John 10:28-29)

‘I will that --’. Christ expresses His will for His people. He wants them to be with Him beholding all the glory which is His, the glory which He once laid aside, but which was now about to be restored to Him by the Father (John 17:5) in accordance with His eternal love for His eternal Son.

‘That they also may be with me’. His desire for them is that finally they may see and share His glory. What a wonder this is, that we are to share His glory. This is expressed vividly and pictorially in Revelation 21:22-23 where the light of the ‘city of God’ is the Lamb, a light to be enjoyed by His people. Yet as Paul makes clear there is a sense in which His people may now share that position and that glory by faith as they recognise that they have been raised with Him and seated in heavenly places in Christ (Ephesians 1:19 to Ephesians 2:6). We do not have to wait for eternity to be with Him and to behold His glory (2 Corinthians 3:18 to 2 Corinthians 4:6).

‘My glory which you have given me --’ This is not the glory which was His by right as very God. That was His by right, and only His (John 17:5). It is rather the glory given Him by the Father when He was chosen to be the Redeemer, the Saviour of mankind, a choice made before the foundation of the world when we also were chosen with Him (Ephesians 1:4), and it is His glory as glorified man.

‘Loved me before the foundation of the world’. He was not only chosen before the foundation of the world but was also loved as well, for unlike us He was there to enjoy the love of the Father from before the beginning.

That Jesus was the means by which, with the Spirit, the Godhead acted in the creation of the world, that He was the means by which the Godhead wrought salvation for the world, also along with the Spirit, means that sometimes we see Him described as though He were in a subordinate position to the Father within the Godhead. But we should recognise that this is as seen from our point of view and is more apparent than real. For they were always together as One, face to face in glorious unity (John 1:2), working as One for the fulfilment of Their purposes, always at One in will and purpose. It was only in their presentation to man, and in the positions that they took in the carrying out of the divine plan, that this idea of subordination was suggested. It describes more man’s way of looking at things than God’s. It was a subordination of presentation rather than of reality. In eternity they are co-equally One.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on John 17:24". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/john-17.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Here Jesus" request clearly included the Eleven with all the elect. He wanted them all to observe (Gr. theorosin) the glory that the Father would restore to the Son following His ascension ( John 17:5; cf. 1 John 3:2). This appears to be a reference to Jesus" essential preexistent glory. His humiliation in the Incarnation was only temporary. Glorification will begin for Christians initially at death or the Rapture, whichever comes first (cf. John 14:2-3; 2 Corinthians 5:6-8). Our glorification includes being with Jesus forever (cf. Colossians 3:4; 1 Thessalonians 4:17). Since Jesus" will (Gr. thelo) was identical with the Father"s will (cf. John 4:34; John 5:30; John 6:38), we can know that the Father will grant this request.

This is one of the clearest passages in the New Testament that sets forth the eternal subordination of the Son to the Father (cf. 1 Corinthians 15:24; 1 Corinthians 15:28; Ephesians 3:21; Philippians 2:9-11). [Note: See John V. Dahms, "The Subordination of the Song of Solomon," Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society37:3 (September1994):351-64.]

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on John 17:24". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/john-17.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

John 17:24. Father, what thou hast given me, I desire that where I am they also may be with me, that they may behold my glory which thou hast given me, because thou lovedst me before the foundation of the world. Having prayed for the spirituality and unity of all His disciples, Jesus now, in the closing petitions of His prayer, passes to the thought of their complete deliverance from the troubles of the world, and of their entrance with Him upon that glory with which He Himself was about to be glorified. It is difficult to translate the Greek verb rendered ‘I will’ in the Authorised Version. ‘I will’ is too strong; perhaps ‘I desire’ comes nearest to the original. The peculiar structure of the verse, in which the clause ‘what Thou hast given Me’ is so remarkably thrown forward, arises from the fact that believers are viewed not so much distributively as in the unity immediately present to the Redeemer’s mind. It is the perfect glory of Jesus not only as Son of God but also as Son of man that is spoken of,—His glory shining forth in undimmed brightness in the heavenly world. There is the true home of His being; and hence not ‘I shall be,’ but ‘I am,’ as in chap. John 14:3. Again, however, we must remember that this ‘glory’ is not that of outward estate. It is the spiritual glory of perfect union with the Father, seen and shared in apart from the shadows of earth. Hence the last words of the verse do not contain a statement of the ground upon which Jesus prays for His own, but of the nature of the glory which they are to behold when the ineffable, everlasting love of the Father to the Son is seen by them poured forth on Him who has taken the human nature into perfect union with the Divine. That had not been beheld in the Man of Sorrows: it shall be beheld when—His sorrows over, but His humanity as true as it had been upon the earth—He is crowned with glory. The full, the perfect love of God will then be seen to have embraced humanity in its tenderest outgoings, and the joy of the redeemed in the vision and fruition of that love will be complete (comp. on John 17:22).

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 17:24". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-17.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

John 17:24. , , “that which Thou hast given me,” i.e., the community of believers; , “I will,” no longer, , “that where I am, there they may be also”; resolved into individuals. To share in the destiny of Christ has already been promised to His followers, John 10:26; cf.John 14:3. This is the consummation of Christian blessedness. They are not only in the same condition as their Lord, but enjoy it in fellowship with Him, .— . To see Christ honoured and supreme must ever be the Christian’s joy. But this glory of Christ resulting from the eternal love of the Father is not only seen but shared in by the disciples in the measure of their capacity, John 5:22, 2 Timothy 2:12, Revelation 3:21.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on John 17:24". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/john-17.html. 1897-1910.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

John 17:24. Father, I will — He asks as one having a right to be heard; and prays, not as a servant, but as a Son; that they also whom thou hast given me — Not only my apostles and first disciples, but all my believing, loving, and obedient people; may be with me where I am — Namely, in that heavenly world to which I am now removing. As if he had said, Since no improvements, either in holiness or comfort, can completely answer the purposes of my love and the promises of my grace to them; therefore I request felicity for them in another and more perfect state of things; that they may behold — May contemplate with everlasting and delightful admiration; my glory, which thou hast — By thy sure appointment; given me — And art just ready to bestow upon me; for thou lovedst me before the foundation of the world — And didst then decree for me that mediatorial kingdom with which thou art now about to invest me. Observe, reader, the happiness of heaven chiefly consists in beholding the glory of the Father and of the Son, Matthew 5:8; 1 John 3:2.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on John 17:24". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/john-17.html. 1857.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

will. Greek. thelo. App-102. Compare John 12:21; John 15:7; John 16:19.

behold. Greek. theoreo. App-133. Compare John 2:23,

the foundation, &c. See App-146.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 17:24". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-17.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Father, I will that they also, whom thou hast given me, be with me where I am; that they may behold my glory, which thou hast given me: for thou lovedst me before the foundation of the world.

Father, I will, [ theloo (G2309)] that they also whom thou hast given me. [The reading ho (Greek #3588) here, instead of hous (Greek #3739) of the received text-`that that also which Thou hast given Me'-which Tischendorf and Tregelles have adopted, but not Lachmann-is insufficiently supported, as we judge, and to be rejected.]

Be with me where I am; that they may behold my glory, which thou hast given me, [ edookas (Greek #1325)] - 'gavest Me;' but the true reading clearly is, 'which Thou hast given Me;' [ dedookas (Greek #1325)]:

For thou lovedst me before the foundation of the world. Here our Lord, having exhausted all His desires for His people which could be fulfilled here below, stretches them, in this His last petition, onwards to the eternal state. Let us attend, first, to the style of petition here only employed by our Lord: "I will." The majesty of this style of speaking is the first thing that strikes the reverential reader. Some good expositors, indeed (as Beza, who, instead of the Volo of the Vulgate, renders it Velim), conceive that nothing more is meant by this word than a simple wish, desire, request; and they refer us in proof of this to such passages as Mark 10:35; John 12:21, (Gr.) But such a word from the mouth of a creature cannot determine its sense, when taken up into the lips of the Son of God. Thus, when He said to the leper (Matthew 8:3), "I will [ theloo (Greek #2309)], be thou clean!" something more, surely, was meant than a mere wish for his recovery.

And such a will, we cannot doubt, was meant in this prayer of the Son to the Father, which breathes throughout the spirit of loftiest unity with the glorious Object addressed, and of highest claim to be heard, more particularly occurring as it does in the final petition, a petition manifestly designed to exhaust all that He had to ask in His people's behalf. 'In John 17:9; John 17:15; John 17:20,' says Bengel, 'He had said, "I pray" [ erootoo (Greek #2065), rogo]; now the language rises, and the word is to be rendered "I will;" not by the weak "I desire." Jesus asks in the exercise of a right, and demands with confidence; as Son, not as servant (compare Psalms 2:8).' To the same effect DeWette, Meyer, Stier, Alford, Luthardt, Webster and Wilkinson, Lange. But observe now the two things thus majestically asked. First, "that they also whom Thou hast given Me be with Me where I am." He had before assured His faithful Eleven, as representing all believers, that they should be so; using the same form of expression as here, "I will come again, and receive you unto Myself, that where I am [ hopou (Greek #3699) eimi (Greek #1510) Egoo (Greek #1473)], there ye may be also" (see the note at John 14:3).

In now asking what He had before explicitly promised, the majestic authority of that "I will" is further revealed. But next, when they have arrived where I am, it is but in order "that they may behold My glory, which Thou hast given Me: for Thou lovedst Me before the foundation of the world." The glory here intended has been already explained. It is not His essential glory, the glory of His Divine Personality, but His glory as the Incarnate Head of His people, the Second Adam of a redeemed humanity, in which glory the Father beheld Him with ineffable complacency from everlasting. Jesus regards it as glory enough for us to be admitted to see and gaze forever upon this His glory! This is 'the beatific vision;' but it shall be no mere vision - "we shall be like Him, for we shall see Him as He is" (1 John 3:2).

Here end the petitions of this wonderful chapter. In the two concluding verses He just breathes forth His reflections into His Father's ear, but doubtless for the benefit of those mortal ears that were privileged to listen to Him, and of all who should read it in this priceless Gospel.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 17:24". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-17.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(24) Father, I will that they also, whom thou hast given me, be with me where I am.—Better, Father, I will that that which Thou hast given Me, even they may be with Me where I am. The thought of the unity of the Church is still prominent. It is conceived as one collective whole, “that which Thou hast given Me” (comp. John 6:39), and the members of it are thought of as individuals composing the whole, “even they may be.”

The “I will” expresses the consciousness that His will was that of the Father, and is the prayer of Him who is one with the Father. He had before said, “I pray” (John 17:9, and Note on John 17:20), but the thought of the union with the Father, expressed in John 17:23, leads to the fuller expression of His confidence that the prayer will be answered.

For the words, “with Me where I am,” comp. Note on John 14:3.

That they may behold my glory, which thou hast given me.—Comp. Note on John 17:22. That we are to think of the future glory of the divine-human nature of Christ, is shown by the addition of the words, “which Thou hast given Me.” The pre-incarnate glory of the Son was of His divine nature only, and is not, therefore, spoken of as given to Him, nor could it be given to those who believe in Him (John 17:22). That with which the Father has glorified the Son, is “the glory which He had with the Father before the world was” (John 17:5), but it is the Son of man who is glorified with it, and therefore it is that human nature is made capable of receiving it.

For thou lovedst me before the foundation of the world.—Comp. Note on John 17:5.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 17:24". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-17.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Father, I will that they also, whom thou hast given me, be with me where I am; that they may behold my glory, which thou hast given me: for thou lovedst me before the foundation of the world.
I will
12:26; 14:3; Matthew 25:21,23; 26:29; Luke 12:37; 22:28-30; 23:43; 2 Corinthians 5:8; Philippians 1:23; 1 Thessalonians 4:17; Revelation 3:21; 7:14-17
may
Genesis 45:13; 1 Corinthians 13:12; 2 Corinthians 3:18; 4:6; 1 John 3:2; Revelation 21:22
for
5; Proverbs 8:21-31
Reciprocal: Genesis 45:10 - be near;  Genesis 47:11 - Rameses;  1 Chronicles 16:27 - Glory;  Psalm 15:1 - Lord;  Psalm 41:12 - settest;  Psalm 45:14 - She;  Psalm 73:24 - receive;  Psalm 101:6 - that they;  Psalm 140:13 - the upright;  Proverbs 8:23 - GeneralSong of Solomon 6:2 - and to;  Song of Solomon 7:10 - his;  Isaiah 33:17 - eyes;  Isaiah 35:2 - they shall;  Isaiah 66:18 - and see;  Malachi 3:17 - they shall;  Matthew 13:35 - from;  Matthew 17:2 - his face;  Matthew 17:4 - it is;  Mark 10:40 - GeneralLuke 9:32 - they saw;  Luke 10:21 - I thank;  John 6:37 - that;  John 7:34 - GeneralJohn 8:58 - Before;  John 10:17 - GeneralJohn 14:2 - I go;  John 16:26 - that;  John 17:2 - give;  John 17:6 - the men;  John 17:23 - and hast;  John 18:11 - my;  Romans 8:17 - heirs of;  Romans 8:30 - he justified;  Ephesians 1:4 - before;  Colossians 1:13 - his dear Son;  Colossians 3:4 - ye;  2 Thessalonians 2:14 - to;  2 Timothy 1:9 - before;  2 Timothy 2:10 - obtain;  Titus 1:2 - before;  Hebrews 9:26 - the foundation;  Revelation 2:27 - even;  Revelation 17:8 - from;  Revelation 21:23 - for;  Revelation 22:3 - but;  Revelation 22:4 - they

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 17:24". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-17.html.

Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible

John 17:24

"Father, I want those you have given me to be with me where I Amos, and to see my glory, the glory you have given me because you loved me before the creation of the world." John 17:24

Nothing short of the revelation and communication of this glory could satisfy the heart of God; and nothing short of the partaking of this glory can satisfy the heart of man. Heaven short of this would be no heaven to his soul. Not to see the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ; to have no view of the glory of an incarnate God; not to be conformed to his glorious image, so as to be perfectly holy both in body and soul—were these things denied, there would be no heaven at all for the redeemed among the children of men. But God, in giving the saints heaven as their happy home, gave them with it an eternal weight of glory. He has designed that all whom he has chosen unto salvation should reach the heavenly shore; that none should suffer shipwreck by the way; that sin should not be their ruin; that Satan should not succeed in any of his devices against their eternal safety; but that every member of the mystical body of Christ should be forever with their glorious Head in the realms of bliss, to behold and to be partakers of the glory which shall be revealed when he comes and all his saints with him.

It is the prospect of this eternal glory which animates the Christian in all his battles against sin, and encourages him never to quit the field until victory crown the strife. It nerves his heart in all the troubles and trials of this mortal state, still to press forward to win this immortal prize, that he may safely reach that land where tears are wiped from off all faces, and where the glory of God the Father, God the Song of Solomon, and God the Holy Spirit will be seen and enjoyed through the glorified humanity of Jesus without a cloud to dim its rays, or intercept its eternal luster.

"Father, I will that they also, whom you have given me, be with me where I am; that they may behold my glory, which you have given me—for you loved me before the foundation of the world." John 17:24

How great, how elevated above all utterance or all conception of men or angels, must the glory of Christ be—as the Son of the Father in truth and love! And not only is the Lord Jesus Christ glorious in his essential Deity as the Son of God, but glorious also in his holy, spotless humanity which he assumed in the womb of the Virgin Mary. For this, though the flesh and blood of the children, was "that holy One who was begotten of the Holy Spirit," and was taken into union with his eternal Deity, that he might be "Immanuel, God with us." The purity, holiness and innocence, the spotless beauty and complete perfection of this human nature, make it in itself exceedingly glorious; but its great glory is the union that it possesses and enjoys with the divine nature of the Son of God. The pure humanity of Jesus veils his Deity, and yet the Deity shines through it, filling it with unutterable brightness, and irradiating it with inconceivable glory. There is no blending of the two natures, for humanity cannot become Deity, nor can Deity become humanity; each nature remains distinct; and each nature has its own peculiar glory. But there is a glory also in the union of both natures in the Person of the God-man. That such wisdom should have been displayed, such grace manifested, such love revealed, and that the union of the two natures in the Person of the Son of God should not only have, so to speak, formerly originated, but should still unceasingly uphold, and eternally maintain salvation with all its present fruits of grace, and all its future fruits of glory, makes the union of the two natures unspeakably glorious.

And when we consider further that through this union of humanity with Deity, the Church is brought into the most intimate nearness and closest relationship with the Father and the Holy Spirit, what a glory is seen to illuminate the Person of the God- Prayer of Manasseh, who as God is one with God, and as man is one with Prayer of Manasseh, and thus unites man to God, and God to man; thus bringing about the fulfillment of those wonderful words, "That they all may be one; as you, Father, are in me, and I in you, that they also may be one in us." And again, "I in them, and you in me, that they may be made perfect in one."

Thus there is the glory of Christ as God, the glory of Christ as Prayer of Manasseh, and the glory of Christ as God-man. And this threefold glory of Christ corresponds in a measure with what he was before he came into the world, with what he was while in the world, and with what he now is as having gone to the Father, according to his own words ( John 16:28). Before he came into the world his chief glory was that belonging to him as the Son of God; while in the world his chief glory was in being the Son of man; and now that he is gone back to heaven his chief glory is that of his being God and man in one glorious Person.

This latter glory of Christ, which Isaiah, in an especial sense, his mediatorial glory, is seen by faith here, and will be seen in the open vision of bliss hereafter. The three disciples on the Mount of transfiguration, Stephen at the time of his martyrdom, Paul when caught up into the third heaven, John in Patmos, had all special and supernatural manifestations of the glory of Christ; that Isaiah, surpassing what is generally given to believers. But the usual way in which we now see his glory is by the Holy Spirit "glorifying him by receiving of what is his, and showing it to the soul." This divine and blessed Teacher testifies of him; takes away the veil of ignorance and unbelief which hides him from view; shines with a holy and sacred light on the Scriptures that speak of him; and raising up faith to believe in his name sets him before the eyes of the enlightened understanding, so that he is looked unto and upon; and though not seen with the bodily eye, is loved, believed, and rejoiced in with joy unspeakable and full of glory. Thus seen by the eye of faith, all that he is and has, all that he says and does is made precious and glorious. His miracles of mercy, while here below; his words so full of grace, Wisdom of Solomon, and truth; his going about doing good; his sweet example of patience, meekness, and submission; his sufferings and sorrows in the garden and on the cross; his spotless holiness and purity, yet tender compassion to poor lost sinners; his atoning blood and justifying obedience; his dying love, so strong and firm, yet so tried by earth, heaven, and hell; his lowly, yet honorable burial; his glorious resurrection, as the first-begotten of the dead, by which he was declared to be the Son of God with power; his ascension to the right hand of the Father, where he reigns and rules, all power being given unto him in heaven and earth, and yet intercedes for his people as the great High Priest over the house of God. What beauty and glory shine forth in all these divine realities, when faith can view them in union with the work and Person of Immanuel!

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Philpot, Joseph Charles. "Commentary on John 17:24". Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jcp/john-17.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Ver. 24. "Father, I will that they also whom Thou hast given Me be with Me where I am; that they may behold !My glory, which Thou hast given Me: for Thou lovedst Me before the foundation of the world."— οὓς δέδωκάς με (Cod. Alex, and Vat. ὃ δέδωκας, summing up the many into an ideal unity: comp. the πᾶν in ver. 2), primarily the Apostles: comp. ver. 6, John 14:2-3. According to vers. 20-23, however, the prayer really extends to all believers generally, although to the Apostles there was assured a specially distinguished place in the Divine glory, Matthew 19:28. The strength of this "I will" lies not in itself (comp. Mark 6:25; Mark 6:35, the will spoken in prayer appears, by that fact, to be conscious of its limitation), but in this, that it is the Son of God who here speaks. That which He absolutely declares to be His will (differently in Matthew 26:39), must also be the will of the Father. To behold the glory of Christ, and of the Father in Him, is, according to ver. 3, the essence of eternal life; beholding it, we become partakers of it. It is not here "the eschatological union of Christ with His people when He comes back in the clouds of heaven" that is meant; rather the blessedness into which the believer is introduced at the moment of death: compare on ch. John 14:3, John 11:23. "Thou gavest," according to the current interpretation, is used by anticipation: the Lord regards Himself as already installed in the glory for which He had prayed in ver. 5. But the words, "because Thou lovedst Me before the foundation of the world," show that we must think of a giving before the world was, abstracted from the temporary interruption which it suffered through the incarnation. It is equivalent to "which Thou, in love, gavest Me before the foundation of the world." "Thou gavest" corresponds to "I had" in ver. 5. This ἔδωκας referred to a glory given before the world was, and confirms what we said upon the δέδωκας, in ver. 22, against those who would refer it merely to the Son of man.

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Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on John 17:24". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/john-17.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

24.Father, I will. To will is put for to desire; (129) for it expresses not a command but a prayer. But it may be understood in two ways; either that he wills that the disciples may enjoy his eternal presence, or, that God may, at length, receive them into the heavenly kingdom, to which he goes before them.

That they may behold my glory. Some explain beholding his glory to mean, partaking of the glory which Christ has. Others explain it to be, to know by the experience of faith what Christ is, and how great is his majesty. For my own part, after carefully weighing the whole matter, I think that Christ speaks of the perfect happiness of believers, as if he had said, that his desire will not be satisfied till they have been received into heaven. In the same manner I explain the Beholding of the glory. At that time they saw the glory of Christ, just as a man shut up in the dark obtains, through small chinks, a feeble and glimmering light. Christ now wishes that they shall make such progress as to enjoy the full brightness of heaven. In short, he asks that the Father will conduct them, by uninterrupted progress, to the full vision of his glory.

For thou lovedst me. This also agrees better with the person of the Mediator than with Christ’s Divinity alone. It would be harsh to say that the Father loved his Wisdom; and though we were to admit it, the connection of the passage leads us to a different view. Christ, unquestionably, spoke as the Head of the Church, when he formerly prayed that the apostles might be united with him, and might behold the glory of his reign. He now says that the love of the Father is the cause of it; and, therefore, it follows that he was beloved, in so far as he was appointed to be the Redeemer of the world. With such a love did the Father love himbefore the creation of the world, that he might be the person in whom the Father would love his elect.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 17:24". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-17.html. 1840-57.