Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 17:26

and I have made Your name known to them, and will make it known, so that the love with which You loved Me may be in them, and I in them."
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Fellowship;   God Continued...;   Jesus Continued;   Love;   Prayer;   Righteous;   Wisdom;   Thompson Chain Reference - Ask;   Christ;   Christ's;   Church;   Family;   Importunity;   Prayer;   Secret Prayer;   United Prayer;   Unwise Prayers;   Wicked, the;   The Topic Concordance - Belief;   Declaration;   Giving and Gifts;   Jesus Christ;   Love;   Manifestation;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Christ, the Prophet;   Love of God, the;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Priest;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Love;   Union with Christ;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Commentary;   Covenant;   Intercession of Christ;   Name of God;   Pre-Existence of Jesus Christ;   Union to Christ;   CARM Theological Dictionary - Hypostatic union;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Adoption;   Name;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Brotherly Love;   Children (Sons) of God;   John, the Gospel of;   Knowledge;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Children (Sons) of God;   Ephesians, Epistle to;   John, Gospel of;   Love, Lover, Lovely, Beloved;   Prayer;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Authority in Religion;   Benevolence;   Character;   Communion (2);   Consecrate, Consecration (2);   Death of Christ;   Devotion;   Fellowship (2);   Force;   Glory (2);   Hunger;   John, Gospel of (Ii. Contents);   Metaphors;   Oneness;   Perfection (of Jesus);   Personality;   Pity;   Prayer (2);   Sight;   Son of God;   Teaching of Jesus;   Witness (2);   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Body;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Children of God;   Johannine Theology, the;   Name;  
Devotionals:
Every Day Light - Devotion for October 10;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

I have declared unto them thy name, etc. - I have taught them the true doctrine.

And will declare it - This he did:

    1st. By the conversations he had with his disciples after his resurrection, during the space of forty days.

2dly. By the Holy Spirit which was poured out upon them on the day of pentecost. And all these declarations Jesus Christ made, that the love of God, and Christ Jesus himself, might dwell in them; and thus they were to become a habitation for God through the eternal Spirit.

Our Lord's sermon, which he concluded by the prayer recorded in this chapter, begins at John 13:13, and is one of the most excellent than can be conceived. His sermon on the mount shows men what they should do, so as to please God: this sermon shows them how they are to do the things prescribed in the other. In the former the reader sees a strict morality which he fears he shall never be able to perform: in this, he sees all things are possible to him who believes; for that very God who made him shall dwell in his heart, and enable him to do all that He pleases to employ him in. No man can properly understand the nature and design of the religion of Christ who does not enter into the spirit of the preceding discourse. Perhaps no part of our Lord's words has been less understood, or more perverted, than the seventeenth chapter of St. John. I have done what I could, in so small a compass, to make every thing plain, and to apply these words in that way in which I am satisfied he used them.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 17:26". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-17.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Thy name - See the notes at John 17:6.

And will declare it - After my resurrection, and by the influence of the Holy Spirit, Luke 24:45; Acts 1:3.

I in them - By my doctrines and the influences of my Spirit. That my religion may show its power, and produce its proper fruits in their minds, Galatians 4:19.

The discourse in John 14; 15; 16 is the most tender and sublime that was ever pronounced in our world. No composition can be found anywhere so fitted to sustain the soul in trial or to support it in death. This sublime and beautiful discourse is appropriately closed by a solemn and most affecting prayer - a prayer at once expressive of the profoundest reverence for God and the tenderest love for men - simple, grave, tender, sublime, and full of consolation. It is the model for our prayers, and with like reverence, faith, and love we should come before God. This prayer for the church will yet be fully answered; and he who loves the church and the world cannot but cast his eyes onward to that time when all believers shall be one; when contentions, bigotry, strife, and anger shall cease; and when, in perpetual union and love, Christians shall show forth the power and purity of that holy gospel with which the Saviour came to bless mankind. Soon may that happy day arise!

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on John 17:26". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/john-17.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

John 17:26

And I have declared unto them Thy name

The Divine name

The name of God is His moral character.
This is the stability and glory of the universe. These words present it

I. AS THE HIGHEST OBJECT FOR REVELATION. “I have declared.” Paul said at Athens, “Him declare I unto you.” Not only is this the highest function of

1. The material universe.

2. Angels.

3. But of Christ the greatest Being.

II. AS THE GRAND ORGAN OF REFORMATION. “That the love,” &c. God’s character is the reformatory force.

1. Moral reformation consists in the transfusion of Divine love into souls.

2. This transfusion of love can only be accomplished through a manifestation of the Divine character. God’s character alone generates love. (D. Thomas, D. D.)

“Love and I”--a mystery

I. THE FOOD OF LOVE TO GOD.

1. Knowledge. “I have made known.” We cannot love a God whom we do not know. Only when the eyes are opened to behold the loveliness of God will the heart go out towards God, who is so desirable an object for the affections.

2. A knowledge given by Christ. It is not knowledge that we pick up as a matter of book learning that will ever bring out our love to the Father. Not knowledge communicated by the preacher alone. “No man cometh unto the Father but by Me.” He that knows not Christ knows not the Father.

3. Knowledge coming gradually. “And will declare it.” As if, though they knew the Father, there was far more to know.

4. Knowledge distinguishing us from the world. It is the mark by which the elect are made manifest (John 17:6).

5. Knowledge of the name of God.

(a) Holy. To a holy mind there is nothing in the world, there is nothing in heaven more beautiful than holiness.

(b) Good;

(c) Merciful; “Who is a God like unto Thee.”

(d) Love, and there is a something about love which always wins love.

II. THE LOVE ITSELF.

1. What it is not. The prayer is not that the Father’s love may be set upon them, or move towards them, but be “in” them. Christ did not die to make His Father loving, but because His Father is loving.

2. This love is of a very peculiar sort. “The love wherewith Thou hast loved Me.”

3. This indwelling of the Father’s love in us has the most blessed results.

III. THE COMPANION OF LOVE. “I in them.” Catch those two words. Here is “love” and. “I”--love and Christ come together. Oh, blessed guests!

1. We are sure that He is where love is; for, where there is love there is

2. You need not go abroad to find the Lord Jesus Christ. He lives within you.

Spiritual illumination and Divine love

I. THE GREAT SOURCE OF SPIRITUAL ILLUMINATION. “I have declared to them Thy name.” The name was the Jewish formulary for God; His perfections, glory, grace.

1. That the saving knowledge of God comes to us by direct communication from Christ. Not by wisdom, virtue, strength of our own; “for the world by wisdom knew not God,” but from the discovery which Christ makes by His word and Spirit: “I have declared.” See it in the woman of Samaria--in His patience with the disciples. It is Christ’s prerogative to convey the saving knowledge of God to the mind; it is our privilege to seek that knowledge from Him.

2. That we need spiritual illumination from above, not only at our first conversion, but through the whole progress of our spiritual life. “I have declared--and will declare it.” Paul prays for the Ephesians that God would give them the spirit of wisdom in the knowledge of Him--and yet they knew Him already. Paul, who was taught not of men, but of Christ Himself, and was even caught up to the third heaven, puts himself among the number of them who know only in part; and this will be true of the most learned and holy men to the last hour of life.

3. It becomes us to acknowledge our ignorance, and to implore Divine teaching. This is a promise to be pleaded in prayer. We are like babes, unskilful in the word of righteousness. The best persons and the best churches still need more light. It is not enough that Christ has declared to them, but He must still declare--not indeed new truths, new essentials of salvation, but He conveys new impressions of truth to the mind; new aptitudes to receive, to appropriate, to exemplify and apply truth.

II. THE GREAT LOVE WHICH GOD BEARS TO HIS CHILDREN It is here compared to the love which God bears to Christ. This love is said to be in them, just as Christ is said to be in them. By God’s love to Christ, learn His love to you.

1. This love is ancient in its date. “Thou hast loved Me from the foundation of the world” (Proverbs 8:22; Pro_8:31).

2. Unlimited in its degree. As you can place no limit to God’s love to the Mediator, so you can place no limit to His love to the people He has redeemed. Many would discourage the hopes of God’s children. Satan himself would rob them of consolation. False systems of religion do this.

3. Enlightened in its exercise. God’s love to Christ was enlightened, and His conduct towards Him was regulated with a view to the office He was to sustain, and He allowed Him to pass through scenes of pain, poverty, temptation. So He does us: much tribulation.

4. Constant in its duration. It is an everlasting love. (The Evangelist.)
.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "John 17:26". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/john-17.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And I made known unto them thy name, and will make it known; that the love wherewith thou lovedst me may be in them, and I in them.

Made known unto them thy name ... The threefold employment of this clause, here and in John 17:11-12, raises the question of what, exactly, is that name. "Jesus Christ" is the great compound name of the Lord, used here for the first time on earth; and it is impossible to separate repeated references to "the name which thou hast given me" from that very compound title of the world's only Saviour. (See under John 17:3 and John 17:11.) This alone can adequately explain the apostolic preference for "Jesus Christ," as used so many times in the New Testament. It is simply unbelievable that the apostles themselves contrived this name, made it their favorite designation of the Lord, and that one of them (John) erroneously ascribed it to Jesus near the end of the first century. No. Christ spoke in John 17:3, as John quoted him.

Love ... in them, and I in them ... There persists to the very end of this sacred prayer the concept of all spiritual blessings being "in Christ" (Ephesians 1:3). Thus John joins the apostle Paul in the superlative importance attributed to being "in Christ." Paul used the expression "in Christ," or its equivalent (in him, in whom, etc.) no less than 169 times in his epistles.[23] To be "in Christ" is everything with regard to salvation. Thus it is clear that the revelation of the plan of salvation formed a part of Christ's purpose in this prayer. Anderson said:

This great prayer of Christ is similar to a final report of work accomplished, the most important of which was to reveal the Father's love and his plan of salvation for all men. That Christ's work was successful is indicated in John 17:8.[24]

It was the accurate memory of the apostle John, aided by the Holy Spirit, that produced the record of this amazing prayer, and not his philosophical imagination that did it. It is a passage which "surpasses all literature in its setting forth the identity of being, power, and love, in the twofold personality of the God-Man."[25]

As Reynolds said:

The supposition that some unknown writer of the second century excogitated such a prayer out of the synoptic narratives, the Pauline epistles, and the Alexandrian philosophy, refutes itself.[26]

The conviction of every devoted Christian who studies this prayer resolves into this: that none but Jesus Christ our Lord could have prayed it, and even he, only in the torture of those pressure-events leading up to the cross. That a person who lived long afterward, and did not even know the Lord, could have composed such a prayer and then have ascribed it to Jesus is only a ridiculous imagination.

Having followed our Lord's thoughts through this sublime prayer, we may exclaim with Peter who, upon another occasion, said, "Lord ... we have believed and know that thou art the Holy One of God."

[23] John Mackay, God's Order (New York: Macmillan Company, 1953), p. 67.

[24] Stanley F. Anderson, Our Dependable Bible (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Baker Book House, 1960), p. 157.

[25] H. R. Reynolds, op. cit., II, p. 340.

[26] Ibid., p. 353.

Copyright Statement
Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 17:26". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-17.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And I have declared unto them thy name,.... Himself, his nature, his perfections, especially of grace and mercy, his mind and will, his Gospel; See Gill on John 17:6. A very fit person Christ was to make this declaration, since he was with him from all eternity, and was in his bosom; the Father did all in him, and his name is in him; and he is the faithful witness; nor is anything of God to be known savingly, but in and through Christ; the apostles are here particularly meant, though the same is true with respect to all that are given to Christ, who are his children and brethren, to whom he also declares the name of God:

and will declare it; more fully to them after his resurrection, during his forty days' stay with them, and upon his ascension, when he poured down his Spirit in such a plentiful and extraordinary manner upon them; and will declare it to others besides them in the Gentile world; and still more in the latter day glory, and to all believers more and more:

that the love wherewith thou hast loved me, may be in them; that is, that a sense of that love with which God loves his Son, as Mediator, might be in them and abide in them, and which is the rather mentioned because they are loved by the Father with the same love, and share all the blessed consequences of it, the knowledge and sense of which they come at, through Christ's declaring his Father's name unto them; and which they will have a greater sense of, and will be swallowed up in it in heaven to all eternity:

and I in them; dwelling in them, taking up his residence in them; not only by his Spirit and grace here, but by his glorious presence with them hereafter; when they shall be brought to his Father's house, behold his glory, and be for ever with him.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on John 17:26". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-17.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

7 And I have declared unto them thy name, and will declare [it]: that the love wherewith thou hast loved me may be in them, and I in them.

(7) He communicates the knowledge of the Father with his own little by little, which knowledge is most full in Christ the mediator, that they may in him be beloved by the Father, with the selfsame love with which he loves the Son.
Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on John 17:26". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/john-17.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

And I have declared — I made known or communicated.

thy name — in His past ministry.

and will declare it — in yet larger measure, by the gift of the Holy Ghost at Pentecost and through all succeeding ages.

that the love wherewith thou hast loved — lovedst.

me may be in them, and I in them — This eternal love of the Father, resting first on Christ, is by His Spirit imparted to and takes up its permanent abode in all that believe in Him; and “He abiding in them and they in Him” (John 15:5), they are “one Spirit.” “With this lofty thought the Redeemer closes His prayer for His disciples, and in them for His Church through all ages. He has compressed into the last moments given Him for conversation with His own the most sublime and glorious sentiments ever uttered by mortal lips. But hardly has the sound of the last word died away, when He passes with the disciples over the brook Kedron to Gethsemane - and the bitter conflict draws on. The seed of the new world must be sown in Death, that thence Life may spring up” [Olshausen].

Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 17:26". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/john-17.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

And will make it known (και γνωρισωkai gnōrisō). Future active of γνωριζωgnōrizō the perpetual mission of Christ through the Spirit (John 16:12, John 16:25; Matthew 28:20) as he himself has done heretofore (John 17:6).

Wherewith (ενhen). Cognate accusative relative with ηγαπησαςēgapēsas which has also the accusative of the person μεme (me).

Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 17:26". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-17.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And I have declared unto them thy name, and will declare it: that the love wherewith thou hast loved me may be in them, and I in them.

I have declared to them thy name — Thy new, best name of love; that the love wherewith thou hast loved me - That thou and thy love, and I and my love, may be in them - That they may love me with that love.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on John 17:26". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/john-17.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

and I made known unto them thy name, and will make it known1; that the love wherewith thou lovedst me may be in them, and I in them2.

  1. And I made known unto them thy name, and will make it known. The knowledge which he had of the Father had been imparted to the disciples, and they had received it, and had thereby been in some measure fitted for the revelation of the glory for which he had just prayed. The world, on the contrary, had rejected Christ's revelation, and had refused to know God, and had thus become unworthy of the privilege here asked for the disciples.

  2. That the love wherewith thou lovedst me may be in them, and I in them. Jesus had revealed the Father while on earth that men might attain to the revelation of God in the hereafter, thus participating in the love which the Father has for the Son because the Son is spiritually in them.

    It is a significant fact that the two of the five petitions of this prayer are for Christian unity. It may be said generally of all the petitions that they ask the Father to complete that which the Son has already begin and completed to the limit of his present circumscribed power.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 17:26". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-17.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Открыл... и открою. Христос исполнил служение Учителя, однако сделал это для явления Отца. Он пользовался не только словами, но и тайным откровением Духа. Итак, Он хочет сказать, что действенно научил апостолов. Кроме того, их вера была еще немощной. Посему Он обещает им больший успех в будущем и так готовит их к надежде на большую духовную благодать. Хотя здесь говорится об апостолах, то же самое можно отнести и к нам. Дабы мы старались преуспевать и не думали, будто бежим настолько хорошо, что не должны пробежать еще больше, покуда остаемся во плоти.

Да любовь. То есть, дабы возлюбил их во Мне, или, дабы любовь, которой Ты возлюбил Меня, перешла к ним. Ибо любовь, которой нас возлюбил Бог, не иная, чем та, которой Он от начала возлюбил Своего Сына, дабы в Нем и нас сделать угодными и возлюбленными. Действительно, как было сказано ранее, сами по себе и вне Христа мы ненавистны Богу. Он лишь тогда начинает любить нас, когда мы прививаемся к телу возлюбленного Сына. Бесценная привилегия веры – знать, что Отец возлюбил Христа ради нас, дабы нам быть и навеки остаться причастниками этой любви. Однако следует отметить фразу «Я в них». Она учит, что упомянутая любовь распространяется на нас только в том случае, если в нас обитает Христос. Отец не может смотреть на Сына, не взирая при этом и на все Его тело. Так же и мы, если хотим, чтобы Бог взирал на нас, должны быть истинными членами Его тела.

 

 

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 17:26". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-17.html. 1840-57.

Frédéric Louis Godet - Commentary on Selected Books

Ver. 26. No doubt the light which has dawned in the hearts of the disciples through the revelation of God in Christ as yet only begins to appear. But Jesus pledges Himself to communicate to them for the future the fulness of the knowledge of the Father which He Himself possesses.

The future: I will make known, does not refer to the death of Jesus, as Weiss supposes, but, according to the preceding chapters (John 14:21; John 14:26, John 16:25), to the sending of the Holy Spirit and the entire work of Jesus in the Church after the day of Pentecost. Reuss well renders the admirable thought contained in the words: And that the love wherewith thou hast loved me may be in them: "The love of God which, before the creation of the physical world, had its adequate object in the person of the Son (John 17:24), finds it, since the creation of the new spiritual world, in all those who are united with the Son." What God desired in sending His Son here on earth was precisely that He might form for Himself in the midst of humanity a family of children like Him, of which He should be the elder Brother (Romans 8:29).

Jesus adds: And that I myself may be in them. Connected as it is with the preceding words, this expression must mean: "And in loving them thus, it will still be myself in them whom thou wilt love, and thus thy love will not attach itself to anything that is defiled." Its object, indeed, will be Jesus living in them, His holy image reproduced in their person.

What simplicity, what calmness, what transparent depth in this whole prayer! "It is indeed," as Gess says, "the only Son who here speaks to His Father. Everything in these beautiful words is supernatural, because He who speaks is the only Son who has come from heaven; but at the same time everything in them is natural, for He speaks as a son speaks to his father." The feeling which is the soul of this prayer, the ardent zeal for the glory of God, is that which inspired Jesus throughout His whole life. His three petitions—that for His personal glorification, that for the consecration of His apostles and that for the glorification of the Church, are indeed the sentiments which must have filled His soul in view of the blow which was about to put an end to His earthly activity. In the details not a word has been met whose appropriateness and fitness to the given situation has not been proved by exegesis. Can it be possible to hold, with Baur, that, at the distance of more than a century, a Christian should have succeeded in reproducing thus the impressions of Jesus? This would be to say that there existed then another Jesus than Jesus Himself.

Weiss and Reuss hold, as we do, that this is the composition of an immediate witness. But they find in certain passages—in John 17:3 for example— the proof that the disciple has reproduced the thoughts of the Master after his own fashion. The second asks whether John had, then, in his hands tablets and pencil to take down word for word the prayer of Jesus.

But, if John truly regarded Jesus as the Logos, we ask once again how could the respect which he must have had for His words have permitted him to make Him speak, and especially pray, according to his own fancy? He undoubtedly did not have his pencil in hand; but the memory is proportionate to the attention and the attention to the interest; now must not that of John have been excited to the highest degree? On the other hand, the words of Jesus, simple, grave, earnest, were of a nature to impress themselves more deeply and distinctly on the heart of John than any other words. Moreover, it is not impossible that, at an inconsiderable remove of time from that evening, John should have felt the need of committing to writing what he recalled to mind of these last conversations and this prayer. Or again, the unceasingly renewed meditation upon these words engraved upon the tablets of his heart and ever refreshed by the action of the Spirit, may have supplied the place of any external means. This inward miracle, if one will call it so, is far less improbable than the artificial composition of such a prayer.

But is the profound calmness which reigns in this scene compatible with the agony in Gethsemane which immediately follows it in the other Gospels? Keim asserts that John by this narrative annihilates the Synoptical tradition.

The conflict in Gethsemane has the character of a sudden crisis, of a violent shock, in some sort of an explosion, after which calmness was re- established in the soul of Jesus as quickly as it had been troubled. This passing crisis has a double cause: the one natural, the singular impressibility of the soul of Jesus, of which we have seen so many proofs in our Gospel, particularly in ch. 11 and John 12:27. By virtue of the very purity of His nature, Jesus was accessible, as was no other man, to every lawful emotion. His soul resembled a magnetic needle, whose mobility is only equalled by the perseverance with which, in every oscillation, it tends to recover its normal direction. Gethsemane must have been for Jesus, not punishment, but the struggle with a view to the acceptance of punishment; and thus the anticipatory suffering of the cross. Such an anticipation is sometimes more painful than the reality itself. The supernatural cause is pointed out by Jesus Himself, John 14:30 : "The prince of this world is coming." Comp. Luke 22:53 : "This is your hour and the power of darkness." The extraordinary character of this agony betrays itself in its suddenness and even its violence. St. Luke had closed his narrative of the temptation in the desert with the words: "The devil withdrew from him, ἄχρι καιροῦ, until another favorable moment." The hour of Gethsemane was that moment which Satan judged favorable to subject Jesus to the new test which he was reserving for Him. There is nothing here which is not in perfect accord with the normal development of Jesus" life.

The sacerdotal prayer is, as it were, the amen added by Jesus to His work accomplished here on earth; it forms thus the climax of this part, which is intended to trace out the development of faith in the disciples (chs. 13-16), and corresponds, notwithstanding the difference of forms, with the passage in John 12:37-50, in which John gave his reflections on the history of Jewish unbelief (chs. 5-12).

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Godet, Frédéric Louis. "Commentary on John 17:26". "Frédéric Louis Godet - Commentary on Selected Books". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsc/john-17.html.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

26 And I have declared unto them thy name, and will declare it: that the love wherewith thou hast loved me may be in them, and I in them.

Ver. 26. That the love, &c.] Claritas in intellecta parit ardorem in affectu. Ignoti nulla cupido. Clarity of mind gives birth to zeal in devotion. The unlearned desire nothing.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 17:26". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-17.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

John 17:26

The Eloquence of the Cross

Christ was standing, when He spoke these words, on the very margin of His death, with little or nothing beyond except His crucifixion; and then He says, evidently pointing to His suffering, "I will declare Thy name." The declaration could be taken in no other sense than the eloquence of the Cross. For after that, He did not talk much with His disciples, but He left the Cross to stand out and speak alone. And had we but the eye of faith to penetrate that deep mystery, I believe that we might stand beneath the Cross on which the Saviour hung, and in that contemplation we might read more of God, and the reality of God's being, than books can ever contain or words can ever express.

I. The first view of the Father which the Cross presents to the mind is His holiness, His unutterable holiness. Sin was impossible to God. He determines to put sin away from Him; absolutely, irrevocably, eternally, to banish all and every sin, and every phase of sin, and every shade of sin, and every degree of sin, out of His own sight for ever. On His Son He laid the gathered sin of the whole fallen creation.

II. His justice. The original sentence of God against sin was fulfilled to the letter. Not a line was erased, not a syllable weakened. All do die—die as it were, eternally; there is no exception. Every man is a sinner, and every sinner dies. Some in themselves; some in Christ. Some in their own undying torments; some in their covenanted Head.

III. His wisdom. He did an act which gives the free pardon of the King of kings to every offender; while, by the same act, He made the law honourable and sin detestable. Who shall dare to trifle with that which went on its unbending way, till it executed the Lord of Life and Glory?

IV. His love. Faithful is it—for it came from all eternity, and it stretches on, unchanging, to eternity again. Large it is—for it reaches from hell to heaven, and girdles the universe. But still, love is a retiring grace; and the heart that would read love, must make around itself a little sanctuary of deep, still, holy, personal thought; and then, in calm, quiet meditation, you will, by the still teachings of the Holy Ghost, find, in a way that no sermon can preach it, how the Father's love shines in the Cross, and how true it is about it, "I will declare it."

J. Vaughan, Fifty Sermons, 2nd series, p. 120.


References: John 17:26.—Spurgeon, Sermons, vol. xxviii., No. 1667.—Homilist, vol. vii., p. 343. John 18—J. H. Evans, Thursday Penny Pulpit, vol. xiii., p. 5, etc. John 18:1.—Homiletic Quarterly, vol. i., p. 69; vol. xvi., p. 225; G. T. Coster, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xii., p. 168. John 18:1-8.—Preacher's Monthly, vol. i., p. 280. John 18:1, John 18:2.—A. Raleigh, The Way to the City, p. 60. John 18:2-9.—Homiletic Quarterly, vol. i., p. 70; R. C. Trench, Shipwrecks of Faith, p. 59. John 18:4-8.—Homilist, vol. iv., p. 326.



Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on John 17:26". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/john-17.html.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

That is, "I have made known unto them thy nature, attributes, counsels, will and commands, and I will continue the manifestation of the same unto the end.

Learn thence, that the saving knowledge of God was not attainable by natural abilities, but cometh to us by the special revelation of Jesus Christ: I have declared unto them thy name.

Learn, 2. That they that have the name of God, his nature, and will, savingly declared to them, do not stand in need of any farther declarations and discoveries of God's nature and will to be made unto them: I have declared unto them thy name, and will declare it.

That is, "That the love which is originally in thyself, as the fountain of all grace, may be communicated and dispensed from thee to them, and become inherent in them."

Learn hence, that it is not enough for the people of God that they are beloved of him, and that his love is towards them; but they must endeavour to have it in them; that is, experience it in the effects of it, and in the sense and feeling of it in their own souls.

The safety of a Christian lies in this, that God loves him; but the joy, the comfort, and happiness of a Christ, consists in the knowledge, in the sensible apprehension and feeling, of his love; therefore Christ closeth his prayer for his members, with this affectionate and comprehensive petition: Let the love wherewith thou hast loved me, be in them, and I in them.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Burkitt, William. "Commentary on John 17:26". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/john-17.html. 1700-1703.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

REFLECTIONS

My soul! do thou, with uplifted eyes, and thankful heart, behold thy God and Savior, in this most blessed representation the Holy Ghost hath made of him, in this Chapter, here entering upon His High Priestly Office; and through faith, come under the golden Censer of his Offering! Oh! what a sample hath he here given, of his all powerful, all prevailing, and unchanging Priesthood. Yes! thou blessed Lord! let my poor soul, I pray thee, never lose sight of the Pillar and ground of the truth, on which thy Church, in all her members, both Apostles and people, stand everlastingly firm and secure; the perfection of thy finished work, and the faithfulness of Jehovah's word and oath, in the Covenant, ordered in all things and sure. It is indeed eternal life, and it is thy office-character, to give it, to know Jehovah, the only true God ; Father, Son, and Holy Ghost; and Jesus Christ, whom Jehovah hath sent.

Oh, ye Apostles of Christ! what unspeakable mercies did Jesus, in this sweet prayer, confer on you! And ye no less, whom in all the after ages of the Church, God the Spirit hath called to the ministry; how are ye all, from age to age, included, in this rich priestly blessing of my God! Oh! for an holy jealousy, over the fold of Christ, in all the under pastors of the Church; to see and know that their commission is of God. Jesus! in mercy to thy Church, grant that none may run unsent; but that all may bear with them, the same sweet testimony as Jesus in this address to his Father gave, concerning his Apostles: As thou hast sent me into the world; even so have I also sent them into the world. Oh! the blessedness for all of this description and character, to have a consciousness of being interested in Christ's prayer; from being sent forth to the ministry from Christ's ordination: Holy Father! keep through thine own Name, those whom thou hast given me, that they may be one as we are!

And no less ye whole Church of Christ! Never, never, lose sight of those most precious words of Jesus, when he said; Neither pray I for these alone, but for them also which shall believe on me through their word. Yes! thou dearest Lord! though thou hast given some Apostles, and some Prophets, and some Evangelists; and some Pastors and Teachers: yet the whole is for the perfecting of the saints, for the work of the ministry; for the edifying of the body of Christ. Thy little ones dearest Lord, are as dear to thee, as the greatest and the best; for all is derived from thee, and none hath ought, but what he hath received from thee. Precious Lord Jesus! the hour is hastening, when that will of thine will be fully accomplished; and from an everlasting Oneness of thy Church and People with thyself, the whole Church will appear as thou hast said: Father I will that they also whom thou hast given me be with me where I am, that they may behold my glory which thou hast given me! Amen.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on John 17:26". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/john-17.html. 1828.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

John 17:26. γνωρίσω, I will make known [‘declare’]) He did so, for instance, ch. John 20:17, “I ascend unto My Father and your Father;” with which comp. Hebrews 2:12, “I will declare Thy name unto My brethren; in the midst of the Church will I sing praise unto Thee.”— τὸ ὄνομά σου, Thy name) as Father, a most loving name.— ἀγάπηκἀγὼ, the love—and I) i.e. Thou and Thy love; and I and My love.— ἐν αὐτοῖς , may be in them) that Thou mayest love them in themselves with the same love wherewith Thou lovest Me: that their heart may be the theatre and scene wherein is to be exercised this love.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 17:26". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-17.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

By the name of God, is to be understood God himself, and whatsoever God hath made himself known by his word and gospel, his attributes and perfections. And after my resurrection, I will yet further declare it to them, who are yet in a great measure ignorant and imperfect in their notions of thee; that thy love wherewith thou hast loved me may be further communicated to them, and be derived to them, and abide in and upon them for ever; because I am in them (so some would have it read, though the word be kagw, which properly is, and I, as we translate it). The words are but a repetition of what our Lord hath often said, and illustrated in, John 15:9, by the parable of the vine and the branches; and teach us this lesson, that Christ must be in those souls who can pretend to any share in that love of God wherewith he hath loved Christ: Know ye not your own selves, how that Jesus Christ is in you, except ye be reprobates? 2 Corinthians 13:5.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 17:26". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-17.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Declared unto them thy name; made thee known to them.

Will declare it; will more fully make thee known to them, to the increase of their love, union, and blessedness.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on John 17:26". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/john-17.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

26.Declared thy name—Unfolding the mystery of grace and glory embraced in the name of the Father.

And will declare it—Unfolding its still more gracious grace, and its still more glorious glory, to them, to the Church of all ages, and to their whole glorious assembly in eternity.

Love wherewith thou hast loved me—Which, as said in John 17:24, was a love before the foundation of the world.

May be in them—Love from God resting upon them, and to God dwelling in them. They thus, by faith, come into a participation of God’s eternal love to his Son. They come into the everlasting beams of the eternal Sun. They enter into the embrace of God’s eternal purpose to glorify all who believe in Jesus. They fasten themselves to the golden chain of God’s election to eternal life of all who know him through his Son.

And I in them—As the life-spring of their immortal existence, the well-spring of their eternal love, the day-spring of their eternal glory. For eternal life, love, and glory, embodied in Christ dwelling in them, are the full consummation of all that the sufferings and intercession of Christ himself can bring to his chosen. And in this consummation does this intercession most fitly end.

Thus close the valedictory utterances of Jesus to his disciples, extending through the last four chapters of this Gospel. They are, first, the colloquy and events during the supper, (chap. 13;) second, the Lord’s after-supper discourse, slightly interrupted by questions, (chap. 14;) third, his parting address of prediction, warning, and consolation, (chap. 15, and 16;) fourth, and last, this High Priestly prayer, (chap. 17.) It is pervaded with pathos, which runs as an undertone even through the triumphant passages both of the valedictory and the prayer. The pathos and the sorrow are soon to deepen into the immediate agonies of Gethsemane and the crucifixion; the triumphal tone is sustained by a prophetic recognition of the victory in the more distant future.

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 17:26". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-17.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

John 17:26. And I made known unto them thy name, and will make it known, that the love wherewith thou lovedst me may be in them, and I in them. The thought of John 17:25 is now more fully expressed, and, with it, the result to which the knowledge spoken of conducts all believers is summed up in the one word inclusive of every blessing, both for time and for eternity,—love. How exhaustive is the mode in which Jesus teaches the ‘name’ of God, the revelation of the Father in the Son,—‘I made it known to them; they know; I shall make it known to them!’ It is the expression of complete revelation, similar—so far as in such a matter we may speak of similarity—to ‘Which was, and is, and is to come.’ Therefore there naturally follows to all who embrace this revelation a perfect entering into that of which it tells, into that love which unites the Father and the Son, and which shall be in them, as Jesus Himself shall be in them, the unbroken rest of ‘peace’ after the toils, the eternal sunshine of ‘joy’ after the sorrows, of the world.

Thus the third section of the prayer closes, its main burden having been that the whole Church of God, believers of every age and country, may be so brought to and kept in the unity of the Father and the Son that the glory of the Son in the Father may be theirs. For then, the conflicts of this world ended, they shall be partakers of the fulness of that love of the Father which shall encompass them as it encompassed the Son before the foundation of the world,—pure, undimmed, undisturbed by the presence of either sin or sorrow,—the Father in the Son and the Son in them, all in perfect holiness and blessedness consummated into One. Thus, too, shall the end of all be attained, the glorifying of Him ‘of whom and through whom and to whom are all things.’

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 17:26". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-17.html. 1879-90.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

will make thy name known to them, by giving them, by means of the Holy Ghost, a perfect knowledge. For if they know Thee, they will likewise know that I am not different from Thee, but thy own well begotten Son. (St. John Chrysostom, hom. lxxxi. in Joan.)

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on John 17:26". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/john-17.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

have declared = declared: i.e. made known. Greek. gnorizo. See John 15:15, the only other occurance in John. Kindred word to ginosko (App-132. ) and gnosis, knowledge.

love. Greek. agape. App-136.

hast loved = lovedst. This whole chapter beautifully illustrates Psalm 119 and Psalms 138:2.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 17:26". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-17.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And I have declared unto them thy name, and will declare it: that the love wherewith thou hast loved me may be in them, and I in them.

And I have declared, [ egnoorisa (Greek #1107)] - 'I declared' or 'made known'

Unto them thy name. He had said this variously before (John 17:6; John 17:8; John 17:14; John 17:22); but here He repeats it for the sake of adding what follows.

And will declare it - or 'make it known' [ egnoorisa (Greek #1107) ... gnoorisa (Greek #1107)]. As this could not mean that He was to continue His own Personal ministry on earth, it can refer only to the ministry of His apostles after His ascension "with the Holy Spirit sent down from heaven," and of all who should succeed them, as ambassadors of Christ and ministers of reconciliation, to the end of time. This ministry-Jesus here tells His Father-would be but Himself continuing to make known His Father's name to men, or the prolongation of His own ministry. How consolatory a truth this to the faithful ministers of Jesus, and under what a responsibility does it lay all who from their lips hear the message of eternal life in Christ Jesus!

That the love wherewith thou hast loved, [ eegapeesas (G25), 'lovedst'] me may be in them, and I in them. He had just expressed His desire "that the world may know that Thou lovedst them as Thou lovedst Me" (John 17:23). Here it is the implantation and preservation of that love in His people's hearts that He speaks of; and the way by which this was to be done, He says, was "the making known to them of the Father's name;" that is, the revelation of it to their souls by the Spirit's efficacious sealing of the Gospel message-as He had explained in John 16:8-15. This eternal love of the Father, resting first on Christ, is by His Spirit imparted to and takes up its permanent abode in all that believe in Him; and "He abiding in them, and they in Him" (John 15:5), they are "one Spirit." 'With this lofty thought,' says Olshausen, 'the Redeemer concludes His prayer for His disciples, and in them for His Church through all ages. He has compressed into the last moments given Him for conversation with His own the most sublime and glorious sentiments ever uttered by mortal lips. But hardly has the sound of the last word died away, when He passes with the disciples over the Brook Kedron to Gethsemane-and the bitter conflict draws on. The seed of the new world must be sown in Death, that thence Life may spring up.'

Remarks:

(1) How strange is the spiritual obtuseness which can imagine it possible that such a prayer should have been penned if it had not first been prayed by the glorious One of whom this Gospel is the historic Record! But it is not only the historic reality of this prayer, in the Life of Jesus, which is self-evidencing. It throws a strong light upon the question of Inspiration also, which in this case at least must be held to attach to the language as well as to the thoughts which it conveys. In such a case, every intelligent reader must see that apart from the language of this prayer, we can have no confidence that its thoughts are accurately conveyed to us. But who that has any spiritual discernment, and any of that spiritual taste and delicacy which constant dealing with Scripture in a devout and loving spirit begets, does not feel that the language of this prayer is all-worthy of the thoughts which it conveys to us-worthy of the Lips that poured forth this prayer: and what internal testimony to its inspiration could be stronger than this? We are not insensible to the difficulty of explaining all the facts of the Biblical language, considering it as inspired; but let not this despoil us of what is beyond reasonable dispute, as illustrated by the language of this divine prayer. Nor need we commit ourselves to the many rash and at least dubious theories, by which it has been sought to explain and reconcile acknowledged difficulties on this subject. Sitting loose to all these, let us nevertheless-planting our foot upon such a prayer as this-rest perfectly assured that He of Whom the Lord Jesus promised that He should "bring all things to their remembrance, whatsoever He had spoken to them," has so guided the sacred penman in the reproduction of this prayer that we have it not only in the substance and spirit of it, but in the form also in which it was poured forth in the upper room.

(2) One feels it almost trifling to ask again whether such a prayer as this could have been uttered by a creature? But it may not be amiss to call the reader's attention to the studious care with which Jesus avoids mixing Himself up with His disciples as He associates Himself with the Father. "THOU IN ME," He says, "and I IN THEE" and again, "I in them, and they in US." This, we think, is one of the most remarkable features in the phraseology of this chapter; and as it has a most important bearing on the subject of the foregoing Remark-the inspiration attaching to the language-so it is in singular harmony with our Lord's manner of speaking on other occasions (see the note at John 3:7, and Remark 3 at the close of that section; and at John 20:17).

(3) Has Christ, in order to give eternal life to as many as the Father hath given Him, obtained from the Father "power over all flesh"? With confidence, then, may we entrust to Him our eternal all, assured "that He is able to keep that which we have committed unto Him against that day" (see the note at 2 Timothy 1:12). For since His power is not limited to the objects of His saving operations, but extends to "all flesh," He can and assuredly will make "all things to work together for the good of them that love God, of them who are the called according to His purpose."

(4) How fixed are the banks within which the waters of "eternal life" flow to men: "This is life eternal, to know Thee the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom Thou hast sent." Beyond this embankment the water of life may not be sought, and will not be found; and the spurious liberality which would break down this embankment is to be eschewed by all to whom the teaching of the Lord Jesus is sacred and dear.

(5) Did Jesus yearn to "ascend up where He was before," and be "glorified beside the Father with the glory which He had along with Him before the world was"? What an affecting light does this throw upon His self-sacrificing love to His Father and to men, in coming hither and staying here during all the period of His work in the flesh-enduring the privations of life, the contradiction of sinners against Himself, the varied assaults of the great Enemy of souls, the slowness of His disciples' apprehension in spiritual things, not to speak of the sight of evil all around Him, and the sense of sin and the curse pressing upon His spirit all throughout, and bringing Him at length to the accursed tree! "Ye know the grace of the Lord Jesus, that though He was rich, yet for your sakes He became poor, that ye through His poverty might be rich."

(6) Small indeed was the saving fruit of Christ's personal ministry-few the souls that were thoroughly won to Him; but those few-how dear were they to Him, as the representatives and pledges of a mighty harvest to come! and how does He yearn over those Eleven faithful ones, who represented those that were to gather His redeemed in all time! And will not His faithful servants learn from Him to value and cherish the first fruits of their labours in His service-however few and humble they may be-according to His valuation?

(7) Hardly anything in this prayer is more remarkable than the much that Christ makes in it of the exceedingly small amount of light and faith to which His most advanced disciples had up to that time attained. But He looked doubtless rather to the frame of their hearts toward Him, and the degree of teachableness they had, than to the extent of their actual knowledge-to their implicit rather than their explicit belief in Him. The servants of Christ have much to learn from Him in this matter. While mere general goodness of heart is of no saving value, a guileless desire to be taught of God, and an honest willingness to follow that teaching wherever it may lead us-which distinguished the Eleven-is, in the sight of God and the estimation of Jesus, of great price. It was precisely this which Jesus commended in Nathanael, and in this respect they were in effect all Nathanael's. Is there not a tendency in some of the servants of Christ, jealous for soundness in the faith, to weigh all religious character in the scales of mere theological orthodoxy? to prefer rounded but cold accuracy of knowledge to the rudimental simplicity of a babe in Christ? to reject an implicit, if it be not an explicit faith? Of course, since the one of these advances surely into the other in the case of all divinely taught believers, even as the shining light shineth more and more unto the perfect day, so those who, under shelter of an implicit faith, advisedly, and after full opportunity, decline an explicit acknowledgment of the distinctive peculiarities of the Gospel, as they are opened up in the writings of the apostles under the full teaching of the Spirit, show clearly that they are void of that childlike faith in which they pretend to rest. But the tender and discerning eye of the true shepherd will look with as much benignity on the lambs of his flock as on the sheep of his pasture.

(8) The whole treatment of believers by the Lord Jesus has three great divisions. The first is the drawing of them, and bringing them to commit their souls to Him for salvation; or in other words, their conversion: the second, the preserving of them in this state, and maturing them for heaven; or in other words, their sanctification: the third, the bringing of them at length to His Father's house; or in other words, their glorification. The first of these stages is, in this prayer, viewed as past. Those for whom He prays have received His word, and are His already. The second being that of which they now stood in need, and all depending upon that, the burden of this prayer is devoted to that sphere of His work: "Keep through Thine own name those whom Thou hast given Me;" "I pray not that Thou shouldest take them out of the world, but that Thou shouldest keep them from the evil;" "Sanctify them through Thy truth, Thy word is truth." One petition only, but that a majestic and all-comprehensive one, is devoted to the third department: "Father, I will that they also whom Thou hast given Me be with Me where I am; that they may behold My glory, which Thou hast given Me: for Thou lovedst me before the foundation of the world."

(9) Does Jesus so emphatically pray here for His believing people, first, that His Father would "keep them through His own name" (John 17:11); and then-dividing this keeping into its negative and positive elements-pray both negatively, that they may be "not taken out of the world, but kept from the evil" (John 17:15), and positively, "that they may be sanctified through the truth"! (John 17:17). What a tender and powerful call is this upon themselves, to keep praying along with and under their great Intercessor, to His Father and their Father, that He would do for them all that He here asks in their behalf! And is it not an interesting fact, that this "keeping" is the burden of some of the most precious promises of God to His ancient people, of many of their weightiest prayers, and of some of the chiefest passages of the New Testament; as if it had been designed to provide believers of every age with a Manual on this subject? Thus, "He will keep the feet of His saints" (1 Samuel 2:9); "Preserve me, O God: for in Thee do I put my trust" (Psalms 16:1); "O that Thou wouldest bless me indeed, and that Thou wouldest keep me from evil, that it may not grieve me" (1 Chronicles 4:10); "He that scattered Israel will gather him, and keep him as a shepherd doth his flock" (Jeremiah 31:10). "The Lord is faithful," says the apostle, "who shall stablish you, and keep you from evil" (2 Thessalonians 3:3); "I know Whom I have believed, and am persuaded that He is able to keep that which I have committed unto Him against that day" (2 Timothy 1:12); "Now unto Him that is able to keep you from falling (this answers to the negative part of our Lord's petition here) and to prevent you faultless (this is the positive) before the presence of His glory with exceeding joy," etc. (Jude 1:24). But

(10) In thus praying, we not only follow the example, and are encouraged by the model here presented to us, but we utter here below just what our great Intercessor within the veil is continually presenting in our behalf at the right hand of the Majesty on high. Indeed, as this Intercessory prayer of Christ, though actually presented on earth and before His death, represents His work in the flesh in nearly every verse as already past-insomuch that He says, "Now I am no more in the world" - we are to regard it, and the Church has always so regarded it, as virtually a prayer from within the veil, or a kind of specimen of the things He is now asking, and the style in which He now asks them, at the right hand of God. So that believers should never doubt that whensoever they pour out their hearts for what this prayer teaches them to ask of the Father in Jesus' name a double pleading for the same things enters into the Father's ready ear-theirs on earth and Christ's in heaven; in their case the Spirit making intercession with groaning which often cannot be uttered (see the note at Romans 8:26), and so, as the Spirit who takes of the things of Christ and shows them unto us, making our cries to chime in with the mightier demands of Him who can say, "Father, I WILL."

(11) Does Jesus so emphatically represent the Father's "word" as the medium through which He asks Him to sanctify them, and the very element of all true sanctification? How does this rebuke the rationalistic teaching of our day, which systematically depreciates the importance of Biblical truth to men's salvation! Between this view of God's truth, and that of our Lord here, there is all the difference that there is between utter and dismal uncertainty in eternal things, and solid footing and assured confidence founded on that which cannot lie. On the one we cannot live with comfort, nor die with any well-grounded hope; on the other we can rise above the ills of life and triumph over the terrors of death. On nothing less than, "Thus saith the Lord," has the soul that repose which it irresistibly yearns for; but on this it enjoys unruffled peace, the peace of God which passeth all understanding.

(12) Do believers realize the length and breadth of that saying of Jesus, "The glory which Thou hast given Me I have given them, that they may be one even as We are one"? The glory of a perfect righteousness; the glory of a full acceptance; the glory of a free and ready access; the glory of an indwelling Spirit of life, and love, and liberty, and universal holiness; the glory of an assured and rightful and abundant entrance into the everlasting kingdom-and all this as a presently possessed, and to-be-presently realized glory? And lest this should seem an overstrained exposition of the mind of Christ in John 17:22, the words which follow seem almost to go beyond it - "I in them, and thou in Me, that they may be made perfect in one; and that the world may know that Thou hast sent Me, and hast loved them, as Thou hast loved Me:" and the prayer dies away with the expression of the means He had taken and should continue to take, in order "that the love wherewith Thou hast loved Me (says He) may be in them, and I in them." It is too much to be feared that few believers rise to this. Yet "this," according to our Lord's intercessory prayer, "is the heritage of the servants of the Lord, and their righteousness is of Me, saith the Lord" (Isaiah 54:17). A grovelling carnality, a false humility, and an erroneous style of teaching, growing out of both these, seem to be the main causes of the general indisposition to rise to the standing which the Lord here gives to all His believing people. But shall we not strive to shake these off, and "walk in the light as He is in the light"? Then shall we "have fellowship with each other" - He and we - "and the blood of Jesus Christ His Son shall cleanse us from all sin." And then may we sing --

`So nigh, so very nigh to God, I cannot nearer be; For in the Person of His Son

I am as near as He. So dear, so very dear to God, More dear I cannot be; The love wherewith He loves the Son -

Such is His love to Me.'

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 17:26". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-17.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(26) And I have declared unto them thy name, and will declare it.—The Greek word here rendered “declared” is of the same root as the verb rendered “known” in the previous verse. It is better to preserve this connection by rendering the clause, And I made known Thy name unto them, and will make it known. His whole teaching had been a making known of the name, character, will of God, to them. In part this had been received, but in part only. The first steps in the spiritual lessons had been taken, but in His Presence in the Paraclete He will guide them into all truth, and make known to hearts quickened to receive it, the love of God which passeth knowledge.

That the love wherewith thou hast loved (better, didst love) me may be in them, and I in them.—Comp. Note on John 15:9. The thought of Christ’s prayer in this verse is expanded in St. Paul’s prayer in Ephesians 3:17-19. It is more than that God may love the disciples, even as He loved the Son; it is that they may so know the nature of God that this love may be in them, dwelling in them as the principle of their life. And then the thought passes on to that fulness which has been present all through this last discourse and prayer, “and I in them.” (Comp. John 17:23.) Going from them, to be yet with them; not to be with them only as a Person without, but as a power within. “I in them” are the last words of the Intercessory Prayer. The words remain in all their comfort for them in whom “Christ is formed;” in all their encouragement for doubting hearts seeking to know God; in all their warning for hearts that do not seek His presence. They are the prayer of Him who knoweth that the Father always heareth Him.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 17:26". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-17.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And I have declared unto them thy name, and will declare it: that the love wherewith thou hast loved me may be in them, and I in them.
I have
6; 8:50; 15:15; Psalms 22:22; Hebrews 2:12
that
14:23; 15:9; Ephesians 1:6,22,23; 2:4,5; 5:30,32; 2 Thessalonians 2:16
and I
23; 6:56; 14:20; 15:4; Romans 8:10; 1 Corinthians 1:30; 12:12; Galatians 2:20; Ephesians 3:17; Colossians 1:27; 2:10; 3:11; 1 John 3:24; 4:13,14 Reciprocal: Deuteronomy 32:3 - Because;  Psalm 9:11 - declare;  Psalm 89:24 - in my;  Isaiah 12:4 - declare;  Isaiah 43:4 - I Have;  Isaiah 60:9 - unto;  Matthew 11:27 - neither;  Luke 10:22 - and no;  John 1:18 - he hath;  John 3:35 - Father;  John 5:20 - the Father;  John 7:29 - I;  John 8:19 - if;  John 11:5 - loved;  John 13:1 - having;  John 14:7 - from;  John 16:27 - the Father;  John 18:1 - spoken;  Romans 8:29 - to be;  Romans 8:39 - love;  Romans 9:17 - that my;  2 Corinthians 13:5 - Jesus Christ;  Ephesians 1:17 - in the knowledge;  Ephesians 4:6 - and in;  Ephesians 4:13 - the knowledge

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 17:26". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-17.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

26.And I have declared to them thy name, and will declare it. Christ discharged the office of Teacher, but, in order to make known the Father, he employed the secret revelation of the Spirit, and not the sound of his voice alone. He means, therefore, that he taught the apostles efficaciously. Besides, their faith being at that time very weak, he promises greater progress for the future, and thus prepares them to expect more abundant grace of the Holy Spirit. Though he speaks of the apostles, we ought to draw from this a general exhortation, to study to make constant progress, and not to think that we have run so well that we have not still a long journey before us, so long as we are surrounded by the flesh.

That the love with which thou hast loved me may be in them; that is, that thou mayest love them in me, or, that the love with which thou hast loved me may be extended to them; for, strictly speaking, the love with which God loves us is no other than that with which he loved his Son from the beginning, so as to render us also acceptable to him, and capablc of being loved in Christ. And, indeed, as was said a little before, so far as relates to us, apart from Christ, we are hated by God, and he only begins to love us, when we are united to the body of his beloved Son. It is an invaluable privilege of faith, that we know that Christ was loved by the Father on our account, that we might be made partakers of the same love, and might enjoy it for ever.

And I in them. This clause deserves our attention, for it teaches us that the only way in which we are included in that love which he mentions is, that Christ dwells in us; for, as the Father cannot look upon his Son without having likewise before his eyes the whole body of Christ, so, if we wish to be beheld in him, we must be actually his members.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 17:26". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-17.html. 1840-57.