Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 18:29

Therefore Pilate went out to them and *said, "What accusation do you bring against this Man?"
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Jerusalem;   Jesus, the Christ;   Persecution;   Pilate, Pontius;   Priest;   Prisoners;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Rome;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Persecution;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Trial of Jesus;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Pilate;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Chronology of the New Testament;   Jesus Christ, the Arrest and Trial of;   Pilate, Pontius;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Pilate then went out - This was an act of condescension; but, as the Romans had confirmed to the Jews the free use of all their rites and ceremonies, the governor could not do less than comply with them in this matter. He went out to them, that they might not be obliged to come into the hall, and thus run the risk of being defiled.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 18:29". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-18.html. 1832.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

Pilate therefore went out unto them, and saith, What accusation bring ye against this man? They answered and said unto him, If this man were not an evil doer, we should not have delivered him up unto thee.

The Sanhedrinists were strongly opposed to giving out the real charge on which they wished to execute Jesus, that he had testified under oath to being the divine Messiah. Their first ploy, therefore, was to avoid if possible naming any charge at all. Pilate understood the character of his petitioners far too well, however, to allow them any such presumption of fair-dealing, with the charges kept secret. No. They would have to spit it all out in open court before Pilate would yield; and even then, he would yield reluctantly.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 18:29". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-18.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Pilate then went out unto them,.... Either into the street, or rather into the place called the pavement, and in Hebrew Gabbatha; see John 19:13 the place where the Jewish sanhedrim used to sit; wherefore in complaisance to them, since they would not come into his court of judicature, he condescends to go into one of theirs, which showed great civility and humanity in him:

and said, what accusation bring ye against this man? meaning, what offence had he committed? what crime had they to charge him with? what did they accuse him of? and what proof had they to support their charge? His view was, to have the matter stated, the cause opened, and evidence given; that the accused being face to face with the accusers, might answer for himself; and he, as a judge, be capable of judging between them: all which were very commendable in him, and agreeably to the Roman laws; and have an appearance of equity, justice, and impartiality.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
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Gill, John. "Commentary on John 18:29". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-18.html. 1999.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Went out (εχηλτεν εχωexēlthen exō). Note both εχex and εχωexō (went out outside), since the Sanhedrin would not come into Pilate‘s palace. Apparently on a gallery over the pavement in front of the palace (John 19:13).

Accusation (κατηγοριανkatēgorian). Old word for formal charge, in N.T. only here, 1 Timothy 5:19; Titus 1:6.

Against this man
(του αντρωπου τουτουtou anthrōpou toutou). Objective genitive after κατηγοριανkatēgorian A proper legal inquiry.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 18:29". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-18.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Pilate

Note the abruptness with which he is introduced as one well known. Two derivations of the name are given. Pilatus, one armed with the pilum or javelin, like Torquatus, one adorned with a collar (torques ). Or, a contraction from Pileatus, wearing the pileus or cap, which was the badge of manumitted slaves. Hence some have supposed that he was a freedman. Tacitus refers to him as connected with Christ's death. “The author of that name (Christian), or sect, was Christ, who was capitally punished in the reign of Tiberius, by Pontius Pilate” (“Annals,” xv. 44). He was the sixth Roman procurator of Judea.

What accusation

Not implying Pilate's ignorance of the charge, but his demand for the formal accusation.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on John 18:29". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/john-18.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

The Fourfold Gospel

They lead Jesus therefore from Caiaphas into the Praetorium1: and it was early; and they themselves entered not into the Praetorium, that they might not be defiled, but might eat the passover2.
    THIRD STAGE OF JEWISH TRIAL. JESUS FORMALLY CONDEMNED BY THE SANHEDRIN AND LED TO PILATE. (Jerusalem. Friday after dawn.) Matthew 27:1,2; Mark 15:1; Luke 22:66-23:1; John 18:28

  1. They lead Jesus therefore from Caiaphas into the Praetorium. See John 18:28.

    FIRST STAGE OF THE ROMAN TRIAL. JESUS BEFORE PILATE FOR THE FIRST TIME. (Jerusalem. Early Friday morning.) Matthew 27:11-14; Mark 15:2-5; Luke 23:2-5; John 18:28-38

  2. And they themselves entered not into the Praetorium, that they might not be defiled, but might eat the passover. See John 18:28-38.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
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J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 18:29". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-18.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Пилат вышел к ним. Мирской человек потакает суеверию, которое высмеивает и презирает. Кроме того, в этом случае Пилат поступил как добрый судья, приказав иудеям изложить свои обвинения. И священники, словно имели достаточно власти осудить того, кого хотели обвинить, ответили лишь, что надо руководствоваться их предубеждением. Косвенно они жалуются Пилату, что он не вполне доверяет их честности. Почему ты не считаешь несомненным, что человек, которого мы преследуем, достоин смерти? Вот как нечестивые, вознесенные Богом на высшую ступень почета, ослеплены своим блеском и позволяют себе все. Вот сколь необузданна их гордыня. Они хотят считать Христа виновным только потому, что Его обвиняют. Однако, если перейти к делу, какое злодеяние Он совершил, исцеляя больных, изгоняя бесов, воздвигая расслабленных, возвращая слепым зрение, глухим слух, а мертвым – жизнь? Дело обстояло именно так, и они отлично об этом знали. Но, как я уже говорил, нет ничего труднее, чем пробудить опьяненных гордыней людей, дабы они судили здраво и беспристрастно.

 

 

 

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 18:29". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-18.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

29 Pilate then went out unto them, and said, What accusation bring ye against this man?

Ver. 29. Pilate then went out unto them] It was much he would gratify them so far in their "Stand further off, for I am holier than thou;" that he would yield to their superstition, which he could not but contemn. But the very Turk, so the Christians pay him his yearly tribute (which is one fourth part of their increase, and a Sultan for every poll), permitteth them the liberty of their religion.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 18:29". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-18.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

John 18:29. What accusation bring ye against this man? This was the most natural question imaginable for a judge to ask on such an occasion; nevertheless the priests thought themselves affronted by it. It seems they knew the governor's sentiments concerning the prisoner, and understood his question as carrying an insinuation along with it, of their having brought one to be condemned, against whom they could find no accusation. Besides, Pilate may have spoken to them with a stern air, so as to signifyhis displeasure. The word malefactor, κακοποιος, in the next verse, implies a notorious offender. As the Jews had still the power of inflicting slighter punishments, their bringing Christ to Pilate was a proof that they judged him to besuch an offender, as to have incurred a capital sentence.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on John 18:29". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/john-18.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Observe here, 1. How Pilate humours these Jews in their superstition.

They scruple to go into the judgment-hall to him; he therefore goes out to them,and demands what accusation they had against Christ.

They charge him here only for being a malefactor, or an evil-doer in the general; but elsewhere (Luke 23:1) they particularly accuse him,

1. "For perverting the nation."

2. "For forbidding to pay tribute to Caesar."

3. "For saying that he himself was Christ a king."

All which was filthy calumny, yet Christ underwent the reproach of it without opening his mouth; teaching us, when we lie under calumny, and unjust imputation, to imitate him who opened not his mouth, but committed his cause to him that judgeth uprightly.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on John 18:29". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/john-18.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

29.] Though Pilate, having granted the service of the σπεῖρα to the Sanhedrim, must have been aware of the circumstances under which Jesus was brought before him, he demanded a formal accusation on which legally to proceed: “se scire dissimulabat,” Rupert, in Meyer.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on John 18:29". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/john-18.html. 1863-1878.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The Roman governor humours them in their superstition (the Romans having granted them the liberty of their religion): they scruple to go into the ordinary place of judgment; he goes out to them, and calls for their

accusation of Christ, according to the ordinary and regular course of judgments.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 18:29". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-18.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

в чем вы обвиняете С этого вопроса официально началась римская гражданская фаза судебного процесса против Иисуса (в отличие от религиозной фазы суда перед иудеями в ст. 24). То, что римские войска были задействованы при аресте (см. пояснение к ст. 3), доказывает, что иудейские власти предварительно что-то сообщили об этом деле Пилату. Несмотря на то, что они, вероятно, ожидали, что Пилат утвердит решение их суда против Иисуса и вынесет Ему смертный приговор, Пилат назначил новое слушание дела в его присутствии.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on John 18:29". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/john-18.html.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

29.Pilate then went out—Taking the diagram of a Jewish house in our commentary on Matthew (vol. 1, 326) to represent Pilate’s pretorium, let us suppose that at the “street” there is a wide area in front of the palace where this multitude, headed by the priests, presents itself. Pilate, when thus called upon by the dignitaries of the nation, sustained by the people, promptly went out unto them, standing in the portico with the multitude before him. The conversation that ensues is so natural and so suitable to the respective parties as to contain proof of its own genuineness. Pilate’s first business is to call for the accusation.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 18:29". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-18.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Pilate evidently addressed the Jews who had assembled outside his headquarters, or perhaps in its courtyard, from a balcony or overlook. He wanted to know their formal charge against Jesus. Pilate probably knew something of Jesus" arrest since Roman soldiers had participated in it ( John 18:3; John 18:12). Moreover Jesus was a popular figure in Galilee and Jerusalem. The high priest may well have communicated with Pilate about Him before Jesus appeared on Pilate"s doorstep.

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on John 18:29". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/john-18.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

John 18:29. Pilate therefore went out unto them, and saith, What accusation bring ye against this man? Pilate was Procurator of Judea under the Roman government; and his character, as described by writers of the time, is that of a skeptical, cold, and cruel man, arbitrary in his acts, and cherishing no feelings but those of contempt for the religion of Israel. He was, however, a Roman judge, and until his passions were excited there is no cause to think that he would not show the usual Roman respect for law. His first question, accordingly, was that of one who would try the prisoner before him with all fairness.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 18:29". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-18.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

John 18:29. ’ The examination began therefore in the open air in front of the building; cf.John 19:13. Pilate opened the case with the formal inquiry, . . .; To this reasonable demand the Sanhedrists evasively and insolently reply (John 18:30): “Had He not been a we should not have delivered Him to you”. It appears therefore that having already condemned Him to death (see Matthew 26:60. . Mark 14:64) they handed Him over— —to Pilate, not to have their judgment revised, but to have their decision confirmed and the punishment executed. is found in Arist., Eth., iv. 9, Polybius, and frequently in 1 Peter.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on John 18:29". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/john-18.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

went out. Greek. exerchomai. All the texts add exo, outside.

accusation = charge. Greek kategoria. Compare Eng. "category".

against. Greek. kata. App-104.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 18:29". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-18.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Pilate then went out unto them, and said, What accusation bring ye against this man?

Pilate then went out unto them - since they would not come in to him,

And said, What accusation bring ye against this man? - `State your charge.'

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 18:29". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-18.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(29) Pilate then went out unto them.—Better, Pilate therefore went out unto them—i.e., because of their religious scruples they would not enter into the palace.

What accusation bring ye against this man?—Comp. John 18:33. They expected that he would have at once ordered His execution; but he asks for the formal charge which they bring against Him. He knew by hearsay what this was, but demands the legal accusation without which the trial could not proceed. As the Roman procurator, he demands what crime Jesus has committed against the Roman law.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 18:29". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-18.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Pilate then went out unto them, and said, What accusation bring ye against this man?
What
Matthew 27:23; Acts 23:28-30; 25:16
Reciprocal: Psalm 64:6 - search;  Mark 15:3 - the chief;  Acts 21:33 - and demanded;  Acts 25:5 - if;  1 Timothy 5:19 - receive

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 18:29". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-18.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Ver. 29. "Pilate then went out unto them, and said. What accusation bring ye against this man?"

Pilate is supposed to be a personage well known, from the earlier Evangelists. The first among them describes him, when he is first introduced, in ch. Matthew 27:2, as the Roman governor, like Josephus, Antiq. xviii. 3, 1, "Pilate, the governor of Judea," and adds his pranomen Pontius. He was the fifth in the list of the Roman procurators of Judea. Concerning the character of Pilate, Philo gives some remarkable information in the Legatio ad Caium (Opp. p. 1033). According to him, he was a proud and obstinate man: ἦν τἠς φύσιν ἀκαμπής καὶ μετὰ τοῦ αὐθάδους ἀμείλικτος. The threat of the Jews to appeal to Caesar in a certain matter provoked him to the uttermost; for he feared that this opportunity would be taken to bring to light all the other offences of his government: the bribes he had taken, the misappropriations he had permitted, the deaths he had inflicted without law or justice, and the intolerable severity he had in many cases manifested. His unquiet conscience came into sharp conflict with his proud and wrathful nature, which made submission exceedingly hard. We have here the key to Pilate's conduct in the matter of Jesus. The two accounts are mutually supplementary. Pilate had a great desire to decide righteously concerning Jesus, since in this case his great passions, covetousness and ambition, were not played upon. The person of Christ made upon him a deep impression. His better nature came out, when he had standing before him personal innocence and righteousness. But his energy was subdued by the consciousness of his earlier crimes, which did not permit him entirely to break with the Jews. While in the end he was obliged to give way, the energy of his character went so far as the circumstances would allow, as we see in the obstinacy with which he persisted in his attempts to save Jesus, and at last in the superscription on the cross. Pilate goes out to the rulers of the Jews. He had not been long in his office before he had occasion to learn that nothing was to be done with the Jews, unless concessions were made to their religious views. He had been obliged to yield to their petition, πηρεῖν αὐτοῖς τὰ πατρία (comp. Josephus, de Bell. Jud. ii. 9, 2, where Titus says to the Jews, "We have kept your country's laws"), after he had received evidence of the ἄκρατον τῆς δεισιδαιμονίας αὐτῶν (Joseph. Bell. Jud. ii. 9, 2; Antiq. John 18:3; John 18:1).

The address which Pilate made to the Jews gave them to understand at once that they would not attain their greatly desired object, to make him confirm without further ado their sentence of death. An illustration of this we have in Acts 25:16, where Festus says to the Jews, who long for judgment upon Paul: "It is not the manner of the Romans to deliver any man to die, before that he which is accused have the accusers face to face, and have licence to answer for himself concerning the crime laid against him." Pilate was previously acquainted with the cause of Jesus. He knew, according to Matthew 27:18, that the rulers of the Jews had delivered Him out of envy; that they who constituted themselves His judges were at the same time a party; and that the question was that of a judicial murder. The warnings of his wife, who doubtless dreamed about what had occupied her thoughts much before she slept, shows that, and in what sense, the cause of Jesus had been talked about in Pilate's circle.

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Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on John 18:29". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/john-18.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

29.Pilate therefore went out to them. This heathen is not unwilling to encourage a superstition, which he ridicules and despises; but in the main point of the cause, he performs the duty of a good judge, when he orders them, if they have any accusation, to bring it forward. The priests, on the other hand, not having sufficient authority to condemn him whom they pronounce to be guilty, make no other reply, than that he ought to abide by their previous decision.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 18:29". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-18.html. 1840-57.