Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 20:28

Thomas answered and said to Him, "My Lord and my God!"
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Backsliders;   Faith;   Jesus, the Christ;   Skepticism;   Thomas;   Scofield Reference Index - Christ;   Thompson Chain Reference - Confessing Christ;   Confession-Denial, Christ;   Confessions, Seven;   Dead, the;   Divinity;   Mortality-Immortality;   Names;   Resurrection;   Thomas;   Titles and Names;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Christ Is God;   Faith;   Titles and Names of Christ;   Trinity, the;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Jesus christ;   Resurrection;   Thomas;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Jesus Christ;   Jesus Christ, Name and Titles of;   CARM Theological Dictionary - Son of god;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Resurrection of Christ;   Thomas;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Apostle;   John, the Gospel According to;   Mary Magdalene;   Peter;   Thomas;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Christ, Christology;   Incarnation;   Jesus Christ;   John, the Gospel of;   Resurrection of Jesus Christ;   Thomas;   Typology;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Confession;   John, Gospel of;   Lord;   Trinity;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Annunciation, the ;   Attributes of Christ;   Body (2);   Communion (2);   Confession (of Christ);   Devotion;   Divinity of Christ;   Lord (2);   Names and Titles of Christ;   Nathanael ;   Prayer (2);   Pre-Eminence ;   Slowness of Heart;   Thomas;   Unbelief (2);   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Thomas ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chief parables and miracles in the bible;   Names titles and offices of christ;   Thomas;   Smith Bible Dictionary - John, Gospel of;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Thomas;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Christ, the Exaltation of;   Christ, Offices of;   Creed;   God, Names of;   Person of Christ;   Thomas;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for May 21;   Every Day Light - Devotion for December 8;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Thomas answered, etc. - Those who deny the Godhead of Christ would have us to believe that these words are an exclamation of Thomas, made through surprise, and that they were addressed to the Father and not to Christ. Theodore of Mopsuestia was the first, I believe, who gave the words this turn; and the fifth Ecumenic council, held at Constantinople, anathematized him for it. This was not according to the spirit of the Gospel of God. However, a man must do violence to every rule of construction who can apply the address here to any but Christ. The text is plain: Jesus comes in - sees Thomas, and addresses him; desiring him to come to him, and put his finger into the print of the nails, etc. Thomas, perfectly satisfied of the reality of our Lord's resurrection, says unto him, - My Lord! and My God! i.e. Thou art indeed the very same person, - my Lord whose disciple I have so long been; and thou art my God, henceforth the object of my religious adoration. Thomas was the first who gave the title of God to Jesus; and, by this glorious confession, made some amends for his former obstinate incredulity. It is worthy of remark, that from this time forward the whole of the disciples treated our Lord with the most supreme respect, never using that familiarity towards him which they had often used before. The resurrection from the dead gave them the fullest proof of the divinity of Christ. And this, indeed, is the use which St. John makes of this manifestation of Christ. See John 20:30, John 20:31. Bishop Pearce says here: "Observe that Thomas calls Jesus his God, and that Jesus does not reprove him for it, though probably it was the first time he was called so." And, I would ask, could Jesus be jealous of the honor of the true God - could he be a prophet - could he be even an honest man, to permit his disciple to indulge in a mistake so monstrous and destructive, if it had been one?

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 20:28". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-20.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

My Lord and my God - In this passage the name God is expressly given to Christ, in his own presence and by one of his own apostles. This declaration has been considered as a clear proof of the divinity of Christ, for the following reasons:

1. There is no evidence that this was a mere expression, as some have supposed, of surprise or astonishment.

2. The language was addressed to Jesus himself - “Thomas … said unto him.”

3. The Saviour did not reprove him or check him as using any improper language. If he had not been divine, it is impossible to reconcile it with his honesty that he did not rebuke the disciple. No pious man would have allowed such language to be addressed to him. Compare Acts 14:13-15; Revelation 22:8-9.

4. The Saviour proceeds immediately to commend Thomas for believing; but what was the evidence of his believing? It was this declaration, and this only. If this was a mere exclamation of surprise, what proof was it that Thomas believed? Before this he doubted. Now he believed, and gave utterance to his belief, that Jesus was his Lord and his God.

5. If this was not the meaning of Thomas, then his exclamation was a mere act of profaneness, and the Saviour would not have commended him for taking the name of the Lord his God in vain. The passage proves, therefore, that it is proper to apply to Christ the name Lord and God, and thus accords with what John affirmed in John 1:1, and which is established throughout this gospel.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on John 20:28". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/john-20.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

John 20:28

And Thomas answered and said unto Him, My Lord and my God

My Lord and my God

Let us consider

I.
THE EXCLAMATION OF THOMAS. It is as much as a man could say if he wished to assert dogmatically that Jesus is God and Lord (Psalms 35:23). To escape from the force of this confession some have charged Thomas with breaking the third commandment, just as thoughtless persons take the Lord’s name in vain and say, “Good God!” or “O Lord!” This could not have been the case. For, in the first place, it was not the habit of a Jew to use any such exclamation when surprised. The Jews in our Lord’s time were particular beyond everything about using the name of God. In the next place, it was not rebuked by our Lord, and we may be sure He would not have suffered such an unhallowed cry to have gone without a reprimand. Observe, too, that it was addressed to the Lord Jesus.

1. It was not a mere outburst, accepted by our Lord as an evidence of faith, but a devout expression of holy wonder at the discovery that Jesus was his Lord and God, and probably also at the fact that he has not seen it long before. Had he not been present when Jesus trod the sea? &c. Now on a sudden he does know his Lord, and such knowledge is too wonderful for him. How I wish you would all follow Thomas! I will stop that you may do so. Let us wonder and admire!

2. An expression of immeasurable delight. He seems to take hold of the Lord Jesus with both hands, by those two blessed “my’s.” There is here a music akin to “my beloved is mine, and I am His.” I pray you follow Thomas in this. Before you Jesus now stands, visible to your faith. Delight yourselves in him.

3. An indication of a complete change of mind, a most hearty repentance. Instead of putting his finger into the print of the nails, he cried, “My Lord and my God.”

4. A brief confession of faith. Whosoever will be saved, before all things it is necessary that he be able to unite with Thomas heartily in this creed.

5. An enthusiastic profession of his allegiance to Christ. “Henceforth, thou art my Lord, and I will serve Thee; Thou art my God, and I will worship Thee.”

6. A distinct and direct act of adoration.

II. HOW DID HE COME TO THAT EXCLAMATION?

1. He had his thoughts revealed. The Saviour had read them at a distance. Notice that the Saviour did not say, “Put thy finger into the nail-prints in My feet.” Why not? Why, because Thomas had not said anything about His feet. We, in looking at it, can see the exactness; bat Thomas must have felt it much more.

2. All the past must have risen before his mind, the many occasions in which the Lord Jesus had exercised the attributes of Deity.

3. The very manner of the Saviour, so full of majesty, convinced the trembling disciple.

4. But the most convincing were our Lord’s wounds.

III. HOW WE MAY COME TO IT. If ever any one of us shall cry in spirit and in truth, “My Lord and my God!” the Holy Spirit must teach us. We shall so cry

1. At conversion.

2. In deliverance from temptation.

3. In time of trouble, when we are comforted and upheld. There have been other occasions less trying.

4. While studying the story of our Lord.

5. In the breaking of bread.

6. In times when He has blessed our labours, and laid His arm bare in the salvation of men.

7. In the hour of death.

8. In heaven. (C. H. Spurgeon.)

My Lord and my God

I. THIS IS NOT AN EXCLAMATION

1. Because such exclamations were abhorrent to the Jews.

2. It would be without warrant in Scripture.

3. It is by its form necessarily an address--“Thomas said to Him.”

II. THE MEANING OF THE WORDS.

1. Lord, κύριος, means owner, and as ownership includes control, it expressed

LXX. for Jehovah, Shaddai, Elohim, and not only for Aden or Adonai. Hence in the New Testament it is used for Christ. He is our Lord in the sense in which Jehovah was the Lord of the Hebrews. Christ owns us both as Creator and Redeemer.

2. God. What this means passes all understanding and imagination. It is easy to say, “God is a Spirit, infinite, eternal,” &c. But who can comprehend the Infinite? We know that one infinite in His Being and perfections must be

3. My means not only that Christ is the Person whom we acknowledge and confess to be our Lord and God, to the exclusion of all other persons out of the Godhead; but that He stands in the relation of Lord and God to us, and that we stand in a corresponding relation to Him; that we recognize His ownership and authority; depend on His protection, adore, love, trust, and serve Him as our Lord and God. This it is to be a Christian. (C. Hodge, D. D.)

The confession of Thomas:

The words imply

I. SELF-KNOWLEDGE.

1. When Thomas says this he is confessing that his past life has been a mistake. The arrogance of his former speech contrasts strikingly with the lowliness of this. A new revelation had been given him, making known the one great need of his souls Lord to control his will, and form his judgment, and give law to his inmost spirit. Our great want is a ruler; submission is one of the deepest of human needs.

2. Thomas had found all he needed in Christ. Christ was “the Truth;” His will absolute righteousness; duty was what he owed to Him. There was no coldness nor vagueness in these names when summed up in the person of His Lord. Love rises to worship in his confession; his heart is at rest when he says, “my Lord.”

II. KNOWLEDGE OF THE MEANING OF LIFE.

1. It was Christ’s perfect knowledge of Thomas which brought from him the confession.

2. It is such a guide we want; one who can read our heart and supply every need. It is such a guide we preach in Jesus; not one who lived a few years in Palestine; but One who was “before all things,” and who is ever with His people. He knows you, for He formed you for Himself; your life, with all its difficulties and perplexities, is His plan for educating you for Himself and God. Each doubt He is waiting to clear away; even your wilfulness does not drive Him from your side.

III. KNOWLEDGE OF GOD.

1. Thomas recognized the character of God rather than the dignity of Christ, and herein lay the true value of his confession. The mere confession that Christ is a Divine Person is barren; the knowledge that God is come into actual fellowship with us in Christ is new life to the spirit. The looking for God in awful grandeur obscures the perception of God in the perfection of moral excellence, the influence by which goodness sways the heart. It was to deliver men from this very error that Christ came. The disciples were ever expecting that Christ would communicate some stupendous truth concerning God. Gradually their conceptions of Him became exalted; Christ’s own words were fulfiled, “I am the Way, the Truth, and the Life.” Here at length from Thomas breaks the full confession that this is God.

2. Thomas could not say, “My Lord,” without saying also “My God;” for it is shocking to yield the whole heart to any other than God. In the fact that he could not but adore Jesus, that Jesus claimed and had won his homage, it was revealed that Jesus was Divine. If He be not God, then are we idolaters; for idolatry is the love and service of the creature as though it were supreme; and higher love and service than Christ has won from Christian hearts is impossible. If He be not God, then have we two Gods: the one a name, a cold abstraction; the other the Jesus who sways our spirits and to whom we render the consecration of our lives.

3. We may now see why so much importance is attached in the New Testament to the Divinity of Christ. The confession of Christ is not an act of the speculative intellect, it is the movement of the heart and the submission of the life to Him. There are Christian Unitarians who call Christ “Lord,” though they hold back from calling Him “God.” There are un-Christian Trinitarians who call Christ “God,” and yet He manifestly is not their “Lord.” It is sad that the words “My Lord and my God” should ever be separated. But he is a Christian, whatever the articles of his creed, who finds Christ sufficient for the soul’s need, and whose life reveals that it is under His rule. (A. Mackennel, D. D.)

Thomas’s confession of faith:

These words imply

I. JOYFUL RECOGNITION. Partings are painful; but the bereavement of the ten was over. And now the restored fellowship of Christ brought Thomas peace. So every new revelation of Christ brings joy to His disciples now. But recognitions are not always joyful (1 Kings 21:20; Mt Mark 1:24; Revelation 1:5; Rev_6:15-16). How different the meeting of loved ones (Acts 12:14-16; Act_28:15; Genesis 45:26; Gen_46:30). So Thomas and all disciples rejoice in Christ who, though He was dead, is alive again, and crowned with glory and honour.

II. DIVINE HOMAGE. Friends rise in our estimation as we know them better. Love tested by trial. Suffering and death reveal the soul. Perhaps we never see so clearly the greatness of our friend as when he is taken from us. So it seems to have been with the disciples. It was only after the Resurrection that they beheld the fulness of His glory. What a testimony to the Divine greatness of Jesus in this confession How horrified was Paul Acts 14:15-16); Peter (Acts 10:25); the angel (Revelation 22:9) at the thought of being worshipped; but Jesus receives it as His right.

III. APPROPRIATING FAITH, “My,” a little word, but of deep significance. Faith is a personal thing. Mark the difference between Thomas’s faith and

1. The faith of devils (James 2:19; 1 John 5:10-12).

2. The faith of mere believers in historical Christianity. It is one thing to say, “The Lord He is God,” and another to say, “My Lord and my God.” Luther says that the marrow of the gospel is in the possessive pronouns.

IV. SELF-SURRENDERING LOVE. Paul says, “Yield yourselves to God.” This is the difficulty; but never till it is done are we truly converted. But once done it is done for ever. The sight of Jesus wins the heart. Conclusion: Happy are those who can say, “My Lord and my God.” Here is

1. The true bond of union (1 Corinthians 1:2; 2 Corinthians 10:1).

2. The noblest inspiration of life (2 Corinthians 5:14).

3. Strength for work.

4. Comfort in trouble.

5. Hope in death (2 Corinthians 4:6-8). (W. Forsyth, M. A.)

Christ satisfying the instinct of reverence

I. THE INSTINCT.

1. Reverence is a word by itself, and has no synomym. It is not respect, regard, fear, honour, nor even awe. It would be inaccurate to apply it to wealth, rank or power. If we reverence their possessor it must be for something over and above them. Even if we give it to age, royalty, or genius, it is only because there is in these a touch of sacredness. For reverence is the sense of something essentially and not accidently above us. Old age is above in the incommunicable sanctity of an ampler experience, and a nearer heaven; royalty is the theory of a Divine commission and a theocratic representation; genius is the possession of an original intuition which is to be a voice for mankind.

2. This reverence is an instinct; but there is much to support the theory of an instinct of irreverence. The insolence of lusty youth, clever shallowness which denies admiration, and can see in religion only a sentiment, or a thing for ridicule, such a spirit may be common in literature and society, but it is no instinct; it is a degeneracy. Man worthy of the name has always something above him; and even where self presides at the worship, it is rather as priest than idol

3. It is easy to misdirect this instinct. Man feels himself very little, an atom in a mighty system. There must be something above him. What? The celestial bodies? This instinct enforces a worship. What object so worthy as they? There are those now who reverence nature, and law to them is but a name for deity, and they worship this unknown god. Others a beautiful friend, till they find some day the idol broken in pieces or vanished. Nor do these misdirections cease when at last God becomes the object, inasmuch as reverence for church architecture, decoration, and music may be giving His glory to another.

II. CHRIST SATISFYING THIS INSTINCT.

1. The instinct is abroad seeking its object. It finds it not in an abstraction. Nature cannot satisfy it. It may be a grand thought that I am part of a system which is the universe and whose breath is deity. Yet I, insignificant I, find no rest in this vastness. I go forth among my fellows, and cannot help loving and reverencing: yet the bright illusion vanishes.

2. Shall it always be thus? I see an end of all perfection, and yet there is in me an idea of perfection, might I but attain unto it. Is there none such? Yes, there is God--the Infinite, Eternal, Self-existent. Yet I feel myself in the land of things too high for me and too vast. Cannot I get nearer, until I touch? To answer this Christ comes forth, takes our nature, obeys, loves, suffers, dies, and bids us follow Him with a love as devoted as it is unidolatrous, being very man and very God.

3. Can this one heart contain all the devotions of all men? Can I be assured of attention in the adored of the nations? Yes. “If any man thirst,” &c. (Dean Vaughan)
.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "John 20:28". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/john-20.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

Thomas answered and said unto him, My Lord and my God.

Thomas' confession ranks among the greatest ever made, being one of the ten New Testament passages which declare categorically that Christ is God (see my Commentary on Hebrews, Hebrews 1:8). This confession is the climactic note that crowns the entire theme of John that "Jesus is God." This pinnacle of the sustaining witness of that theme is inherent in the fact that even an apostle who at first would not believe came back to confess, "My Lord and my God."

Copyright Statement
Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 20:28". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-20.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And Thomas answered and said unto him,.... Without examining his hands and side, and as astonished at his condescension and grace, and ashamed of his unbelief:

my Lord and my God; he owns him to be Lord, as he was both by creation and redemption; and God, of which he was fully assured from his omniscience, which he had given a full proof of, and from the power that went along with his words to his heart, and from a full conviction he now had of his resurrection from the dead. He asserts his interest in him as his Lord and his God; which denotes his subjection to him, his affection for him, and faith in him; so the divine word is called in Philo the Jew, κυριος μου, "my Lord"F24Lib. Allegor. l. 2. p. 101. .

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on John 20:28". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-20.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Thomas answered and said unto him, My Lord and my God — That Thomas did not do what Jesus invited him to do, and what he had made the condition of his believing, seems plain from John 20:29 (“Because thou hast seen Me, thou hast believed”). He is overpowered, and the glory of Christ now breaks upon him in a flood. His exclamation surpasses all that had been yet uttered, nor can it be surpassed by anything that ever will be uttered in earth or heaven. On the striking parallel in Nathanael, see on John 1:49. The Socinian invasion of the supreme divinity of Christ here manifestly taught - as if it were a mere call upon God in a fit of astonishment - is beneath notice, save for the profanity it charges upon this disciple, and the straits to which it shows themselves reduced.

Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 20:28". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/john-20.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

My Lord and my God (ο κυριος μου και ο τεος μουHo kurios mou kai ho theos mou). Not exclamation, but address, the vocative case though the form of the nominative, a very common thing in the Koiné. Thomas was wholly convinced and did not hesitate to address the Risen Christ as Lord and God. And Jesus accepts the words and praises Thomas for so doing.

Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 20:28". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-20.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And Thomas answered and said unto him, My Lord and my God.

And Thomas said, My Lord and my God — The disciples had said, We have seen the Lord. Thomas now not only acknowledges him to be the Lord, as he had done before, and to be risen, as his fellow disciples had affirmed, but also confesses his Godhead, and that more explicitly than any other had yet done. And all this he did without putting his hand upon his side.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on John 20:28". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/john-20.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

Thomas answered and said unto him, My Lord and my God1.

  1. My Lord and my God. We have here the first confession of Christ as God. It should be said in Thomas' favor that if his doubts were heaviest, his confession of faith was fullest. He had more doubts as to the resurrection because it meant more to him; it meant that Jesus was none other than God himself.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 20:28". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-20.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

My Lord and my God. It cannot be doubted that these terms were both applied by Thomas personally to the Savior. The attempts to give some other construction to such expressions are now generally abandoned by those who are unwilling to admit, on any evidence, the inference which flows from them. They find it to be easier to take the ground that the apostles themselves were in error, than to force unnatural constructions upon language so unequivocal as that which they often used.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on John 20:28". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/john-20.html. 1878.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Господь мой и Бог мой! Фома проснулся слишком поздно и, как обычно делают люди, приходящие в себя, восклицает от восхищения: Господь мой и Бог мой. Столь краткое восклицание говорит о великой пламенности. Нет сомнения, что Фома устыдился и воскликнул, как бы осуждая свое прежнее тупоумие. Столь внезапное восклицание показывает, что вера, несмотря на свою подавленность, еще не совсем в нем угасла. Не божество Христа увидел он в Его боку и руках, но из этих знаков вывел нечто большее, чем видно на первый взгляд. Откуда все это, если не оттого что Фома как бы пришел в себя от забывчивости и оцепенения? Итак, истинно то, что я уже говорил: вера, кажущаяся погибшей, еще скрывалась в его сердце. То же самое происходит во многих людях. Временно они распутничают, как бы сбросив с себя страх Божий, и в них не заметно никакой веры. Но как только Бог прикасается к ним Своей плеткой, они, покорив плотскую похоть, мгновенно приходят в себя. Действительно, болезнь сама по себе еще не достаточна для научения благочестию. Отсюда мы выводим, что по устранении препятствий прорастает то самое благое семя, которое до этого пребывало в подавленном состоянии.

Пример сего мы наблюдаем в царе Давиде. Мы видим, как он спокойно резвится, влекомый собственной похотью. Всякий подумал бы, что вера в то время полностью разрушена в его душе. Однако вскоре, по увещеванию пророка, он внезапно возвращается на ее путь. Так что можно заключить: в его душе оставалась некая искорка, вскоре разгоревшаяся в пламя. Что касается самих людей, они ведут себя так, словно полностью лишены веры и всякой благодати Духа. Но безграничная благость Божия приводит к тому, что избранные не падают в пучину полного отчуждения. Посему надобно усердно стараться не отпасть от веры. Но при этом верить: Бог тайною уздою удерживает Своих избранных и не дает им впасть в погибель, Он всегда чудесным образом лелеет в их сердцах сколь угодно малые искорки веры, которые затем возжигает новым воздействием Своего Духа.

Кроме того, исповедание Фомы содержит две части. Он исповедует, что Христос – его Господь. А потом восходит выше и называет Его также Богом. Мы знаем, в каком смысле Писание приписывает Христу имя «Господь». В том, что Отец поставил Его содержащим все Своей властью верховным правителем, пред Которым преклонится любое колено, и Который, будучи наместником Отца, управляет этим миром. Таким образом, Ему приличествует имя Господь постольку, поскольку Он является Посредником, явленным во плоти, и главою Церкви. Но Фома, познав Его Господом, тут же возносится выше к Его вечному божеству. И делает это вполне заслуженно. Ведь Христос спустился к нам, уничижил Себя, а затем воссел одесную Отца, обретя власть над небом и землею. Он сделал это для того, чтобы вознести нас к Своей общей с Отцом божеской славе. Посему, дабы наша вера достигла вечного божества Христа, она должна начать с более близкого и легкого знания. Так что, некоторые правильно говорили: от Христа человека мы приходим ко Христу Богу. Ведь вера наша возрастает постепенно. Познав Христа на земле, рожденным в яслях, повешенным на кресте, она переходит ко славе Его воскресения, а уже потом – к Его вечной жизни и силе, в которой сияет божеское величие. Кроме того, можно сделать вывод: мы не можем правильно познать Христа Господом, чтобы тут же не признать Его божества. Нет сомнения: это должно быть общим исповеданием благочестивых. Ведь Христос, как мы видим, полностью его одобрил. Он никогда бы не потерпел, чтобы люди ложно похищали честь у Отца и переносили ее на Него. Однако Христос открыто одобрил сказанное Фомой. Так что одного этого места достаточно для опровержения безумия Ария. Ибо не подобает измышлять себе двух Богов. Добавь, что одновременно здесь выражается единство Христовой ипостаси. Ведь один и Тот же Христос зовется и Богом, и Господом. Фома подчеркнуто дважды повторяет слово «мой», показывая тем самым, что говорит с живой и искренней верой.

 

 

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 20:28". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-20.html. 1840-57.

Scofield's Reference Notes

My Lord and My God

The deity of Jesus Christ is declared in Scripture:

(1) In the intimations and explicit predictions of the O.T.

(a) The theophanies intimate the appearance of God in human form, and His ministry thus to man Genesis 16:7-13; Genesis 18:2-23 especially; Genesis 18:17; Genesis 32:28 with; Hosea 12:3-5; Exodus 3:2-14. (b) The Messiah is expressly declared to be the Son of God Psalms 2:2-9 and God; Psalms 45:6; Psalms 45:7; Hebrews 1:8; Hebrews 1:9; Psalms 110:1; Matthew 22:44; Acts 2:34; Hebrews 1:13; Psalms 110:4; Hebrews 5:6; Hebrews 6:20; Hebrews 7:17-21; Zechariah 6:13. (c) His virgin birth was foretold as the means through which God could be "Immanuel," God with us; Isaiah 7:13; Isaiah 7:14; Matthew 1:22; Matthew 1:23 (d) The Messiah is expressly invested with the divine names Isaiah 9:6; Isaiah 9:7 (e) In a prophecy of His death He is called Jehovah's "fellow"; Zechariah 13:7; Matthew 26:31. (f) His eternal being is declared; Micah 5:2; Matthew 2:6; John 7:42.

(2) Christ Himself affirmed His deity.

(a) He applied to Himself the Jehovistic I AM. (The pronoun "he" is not in the Greek; cf John 8:24; John 8:56-58. The Jews correctly understood this to be our Lord's claim to full deity. John 8:59.

See also, John 10:33; John 18:4-6 where, also, "he" is not in the original.) (b) He claimed to be the Adonai of the O.T. Matthew 22:42-45. (See Scofield "Genesis 15:2"). (c) He asserted His identity with the Father; Matthew 28:19; Mark 14:62; John 10:30, that the Jews so understood Him is shown by; John 10:31; John 10:32; John 14:8; John 14:9; John 17:5. (d) He exercised the chief prerogative of God; Mark 2:5-7; Luke 7:48-50. (e) He asserted omnipresence; Matthew 18:20; John 3:13 omniscience, John 11:11-14, when Jesus was fifty miles away; Mark 11:6-8, omnipotence; Matthew 28:18; Luke 7:14; John 5:21-23; John 6:19, mastery over nature, and creative power; Luke 9:16; Luke 9:17; John 2:9; John 10:28. (f) He received and approved human worship,; Matthew 14:33; Matthew 28:9; John 20:28; John 20:29.

(3) The N.T. writers ascribe divine titles to Christ: John 1:1; John 20:28; Acts 20:28; Romans 1:4; Romans 9:5; 2 Thessalonians 1:12; 1 Timothy 3:16; Titus 2:13; Hebrews 1:8; 1 John 5:20.

(4) The N.T. writers ascribe divine perfections and attributes to Christ (e.g.) Matthew 11:28; Matthew 18:20; Matthew 28:20; John 1:2; John 2:23-25; John 3:13; John 5:17; John 21:17; Hebrews 1:3; Hebrews 1:11; Hebrews 1:12; Hebrews 13:8; Revelation 1:8; Revelation 1:17; Revelation 1:18; Revelation 2:23; Revelation 11:17; Revelation 22:13.

(5) The N.T. writers ascribe divine works to Christ John 1:3; John 1:10; Colossians 1:16; Colossians 1:17; Hebrews 1:3.

(6) The N.T. writers teach that supreme worship should be paid to Christ Acts 7:59; Acts 7:60; 1 Corinthians 1:2; 2 Corinthians 13:14; Philippians 2:9; Philippians 2:10; Hebrews 1:6; Revelation 1:5; Revelation 1:6; Revelation 5:12; Revelation 5:13.

(7) The holiness and resurrection of Christ prove His deity John 8:46; Romans 1:4.

Copyright Statement
These files are considered public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available in the Online Bible Software Library.
Bibliographical Information
Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on John 20:28". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/john-20.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

28 And Thomas answered and said unto him, My Lord and my God.

Ver. 28. My Lord and my God] This is true faith indeed, that individuates God, and appropriates him to itself. {a} Were it not for this possessive "mine," the devil might say the creed to as good purpose as we. He believes there is a God and a Christ; but that which torments him is, he can say "my" to never an article of the faith.

{a} η πιστις ιδιοποιεται τον θεον. Chrysost.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 20:28". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-20.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

John 20:28

I. We are, I think, hardly apt to be enough aware how much of all our Christian faith and hope must rest on the reality of our Lord's resurrection. It is, in the first place, the fulfilment of all prophecy. I mean, that whereas all prophecy looks forward to the triumph of good over evil—to its triumph not partially merely, but entirely, and with over-measure—so the resurrection of Christ is, as yet, the only adequate fulfilment of these expectations; but it is itself fully adequate. If Christ's triumph was complete, so also may be the triumph of those that are Christ's. But without this, let hope go as far as she will, let faith be ever so confident, still prophecy has been unfulfilled, still experience gives no encouragement.

II. Well, then, may it be said with the apostle, that if Christ is not risen our faith is vain. His resurrection was, indeed, almost too great a joy to be believed. There might be illusion; the spirit of One so good, so beloved by God, might be allowed to return to comfort His friends, to assure them that death had not done all his work; but who could dare to hope that he should see, not the spirit of the dead, but the very person of the living Jesus? Surely it was a natural conviction of such overwhelming blessedness? "Except I shall see in His hands the print of the nails, and put my finger into the print of the nails, and thrust my hand into His side, I will not believe." Thanks be to God, who allowed His apostle to be thus careful ere he consented to believe, that we from His care might derive such perfect confidence.

III. Jesus said unto him, "Thomas, because thou hast seen Me, thou hast believed: blessed are they who have not seen, and yet have believed." A few days before Christ had prayed, not for His present disciples only, but for all those who were to believe on Him through their word. How graciously is His act in accordance with His prayer. The beloved disciple who had seen first the empty sepulchre, and who was now rejoicing in the full presence of Him who had been there, he was to convey what he had himself seen to the knowledge of posterity. And he was to convey it hallowed as it were by Christ's especial message—"Blessed are they who have not seen, and yet have believed." We have all our portion in the full conviction then afforded that He was risen indeed; and besides all this we have received a peculiar blessing; Christ Himself gives us the proof of His resurrection, and blesses us for the joy with which we welcome it.

T. Arnold, Sermons., vol. vi., p. 172.


References: John 20:28.—Spurgeon, Sermons, vol. xxx., No. 1775; Clergyman's Magazine, vol. v., p. 32.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on John 20:28". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/john-20.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

John 20:28. Thomas answered and said, &c.— Though the nominative often occurs for the vocative, it is the former case which is used here, the words συ ει, thou art, being understood. To this the context agrees; for we are told that these words were addressed to Jesus; wherefore they cannot be taken merely as an exclamation of surprise, which is the Socinian gloss; but their meaning is, "Thou art really he whom I lately followed as my Lord; and I confess thee to be possessed of infinite knowledge, and worship thee as my God." It is not fair that Thomas actually touched our Lord's wounds; and Christ himself says afterwards, John 20:29 that his belief was built on sight; which, though it does not exclude any evidence that might have been afforded the other senses, yet seems to intimate, that this condescension of our Lord, together with the additional evidence arising from the knowledge that he plainly had of that unreasonable demand which Thomas had made in his absence, with divine grace accompanying the whole, quite overcame him.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on John 20:28". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/john-20.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

These words may be considered two ways.

1. As an abrupt speech, importing a vehement admiration of Christ's mercy towards him, and of his own stupidity and dullness to believe.

Learn hence, that the convincing condescension of Christ turns unbelief into a rapture of holy admiration and humble adoration.

2. This expression of Thomas, My Lord and my God, contain a short, but absolute, confession of faith. Thomas rightly collects from this resurrection, that he was Lord, God blessed for evermore, the true Messias, the expected Redeemer, and accordingly with an explicit faith he now professes his interest in him, saying, My Lord and my God.

Yet note, that this resurrection could not make him God, and render him then the object of divine worship, if he had been only a creature before.

And farther observe, that Christ doth not reprove Thomas for owning him as God, which shows that Thomas did not mistake in owning the divinity of Christ.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Burkitt, William. "Commentary on John 20:28". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/john-20.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

28.] The Socinian view, that these words, ὁ κύρ. μου κ. ὁ θεός μου, are merely an exclamation, is refuted—(1) By the fact that no such exclamations were in use among the Jews. (2) By the εἶπεν αὐτῷ. (3) By the impossibility of referring ὁ κύριός μου to another than Jesus: see John 20:13. (4) By the N.T. usage of expressing the vocative by the nom. with an article. (5) By the utter psychological absurdity of such a supposition: that one just convinced of the presence of Him whom he deeply loved, should, instead of addressing Him, break out into an irrelevant cry. (6) By the further absurdity of supposing that if such were the case, the Apostle John, who of all the sacred writers most constantly keeps in mind the object for which he is writing, should have recorded any thing so beside that object. (7) By the intimate conjunction of πεπίστευκας—see below. Dismissing it therefore, we observe that this is the highest confession of faith which has yet been made;—and that it shews that (though not yet fully) the meaning of the previous confessions of His being ‘the Son of God’ was understood. Thus John, in the very close of his Gospel (see on John 20:30-31) iterates the testimony with which he began it—to the Godhead of the Word who became flesh: and by this closing confession, shews how the testimony of Jesus to Himself had gradually deepened and exalted the Apostles’ conviction, from the time when they knew Him only as ὁ υἱὸς τοῦ ἰωσήφ (ch. John 1:46), till now when He is acknowledged as their LORD and their GOD.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on John 20:28". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/john-20.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

John 20:28. αὐτῷ, unto Him) Therefore it was Jesus whom he called Lord and God, and that too, his Lord and his God: which is in consonance with the language which is recorded in John 20:17 : nor do these words form a mere exclamation. The disciples had said, τὸν κύριον, the Lord, John 20:25 : now Thomas, being recalled to faith, not merely acknowledges Jesus to be Lord, as previously he had himself acknowledged, and that He was risen again, as his fellow-disciples were affirming; but even confesses His Godhead in a higher sense than any one had yet confessed. Moreover, the language is abrupt through the suddenness of the feeling excited in him, in this sense, “My Lord and my God,” I believe and acknowledge that Thou art my Lord and my God: and the absolute appellation has the force of an enunciation. A similar Vocative occurs twice in John 20:16, also in Hosea 2:23, “I will say, thou, my people, and they shall say, Thou, my God.” Artemonius in Part i. ch. 24, with which comp. the pref. p. 20 and p. d. 2, brings forward a new explanation, whereby Thomas is made to call Jesus Lord, and the Father who exists in Him inseparably, God: but in that case Thomas would not have addressed both titles unto Him ( αὐτῷ); but would have been addressing the one to Jesus, the other to the Father, by a sudden apostrophe, [When the language is suddenly turned to another person present or absent, differently from what was the intention of the speaker at the beginning. Append.] which by no means accords with the admiring astonishment of Thomas. If this had been the intention of Thomas, John would not have added, αὐτῷ, unto Him. Thomas had not before expressly rejected faith in God the Father, but he had, in the case of Christ: therefore now it is not in the Father that he declares expressly his believing again, but in Christ. [This confession moreover is approved of in the following verse.—V. g.]

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 20:28". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-20.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

My Lord, to whom I wholly yield and give up my self; and my God, in whom I believe. It is observed, that this is the first time that in the Gospel the name of God is given to Christ; he was now by his resurrection declared to be the Son of God with power, Revelation 1:4. So as Thomas did not show more weakness and unbelief at the first, than he showed faith at last, being the first that acknowledged Christ as God over all blessed for ever, the object of people’s faith and confidence, and his Lord, to whom he freely yielded up himself as a servant, to be guided and conducted by him.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 20:28". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-20.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

Господь мой и Бог мой! Этими словами Фома заявил о своей твердой вере в Воскресение, а значит и в то, что Иисус Христос, Сын Божий, есть Бог (Тит. 2:13). Это – величайшее исповедание, которое может сделать человек. Исповедание Фомы служит подходящим кульминационным пунктом записанной цели Евангелия Иоанна (см. ст. 30, 31).

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on John 20:28". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/john-20.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

My Lord and my God; this was addressed to Jesus Christ, and was commended by him as a just expression of true faith. Jesus Christ approves of being addressed by his people as their Lord and their God. The more they become acquainted with him, the deeper is their conviction that this is his true character, and the more do both affection and duty lead them thus to adore him. Chap John 5:23.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on John 20:28". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/john-20.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

28.My Lord and my God—Thomas now does nobly. He has his fill of proof and tact, and he pours heart and soul and body into an act of faith and confession. We may now see that Thomas had never been at bottom an infidel. Even under his I will not believe there was at bottom a spirit of faith; and when the load of despondency is removed, he rises at a spring into a higher confession than apostle ever yet uttered. That Thomas here recognized in Christ that divinity which the great body of the Church attributes to Jesus, has been the view received from antiquity to this day. It is not to be questioned without results fundamentally dangerous.

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 20:28". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-20.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Evidently Thomas did not take up Jesus" offer. The sight of his Savior seems to have been enough to convince him (cf. John 20:29). Thomas then uttered one of the most profound declarations of saving faith in Scripture. For a Jew to call another human being "my Lord and my God" was blasphemy under normal circumstances (cf. John 10:33). Yet that is precisely who Thomas believed Jesus was. It is also who John presented Jesus as being throughout this Gospel. Both titles were titles of deity in the Old Testament. Thomas had come to believe that Jesus was his lord in a fuller sense than before, and he now believed that Jesus was fully God.

"The repeated pronoun my does not diminish the universality of Jesus" lordship and deity, but it ensures that Thomas" words are a personal confession of faith. Thomas thereby not only displays his faith in the resurrection of Jesus Christ, but points to its deepest meaning; it is nothing less than the revelation of who Jesus Christ is. The most unyielding sceptic [sic] has bequeathed to us the most profound confession." [Note: Carson, The Gospel . . ., p659.]

Now Thomas believed as his fellow disciples had come to believe (cf. John 20:25). His confession is a model that John presented for all future disciples. It is the high point of this Gospel (cf. John 1:1; John 1:14; John 1:18). John"s other witnesses to Jesus" deity were John the Baptist ( John 1:34), Nathanael ( John 1:49), Jesus Himself ( John 5:25; John 10:36), Peter ( John 6:69), the healed blind man ( John 9:35), Martha ( John 11:27), and John the Apostle ( John 20:30-31).

"Nobody has previously addressed Jesus like this. It marks a leap of faith. In the moment that he came to see that Jesus was indeed risen from the dead Thomas came to see something of what that implied. Mere men do not rise from the dead in this fashion. The One who was now so obviously alive, although he had died, could be addressed in the language of adoring worship." [Note: Morris, p753.]

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on John 20:28". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/john-20.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

John 20:28. Thomas answered and said unto him, My Lord and my God. He passes at once from the depths of his despondency and hesitation to the most exalted faith. The words are certainly addressed to Jesus; and it is unnecessary to combat the position that they are only an expression of the apostle’s thankfulness to God for what he has seen. They are a triumphant confession of his faith, not simply in the Resurrection, but in Him whom he sees before him in all the Divinity both of His Person and of His work. Yet we are not to imagine that only now for the first time did such thoughts enter his mind. They had been long vaguely entertained, long feebly cherished. Nor can we doubt that they had been gaining strength, when they were suddenly dashed by that death upon the cross with which it seemed impossible to reconcile them. Then came the tidings of the Resurrection, even in themselves most startling, but to Thomas (we may well suppose) more startling than to any of the other apostles. Were they true? He saw in an instant how incalculable would be the consequences. It was this very perception of the greatness of the tidings that led him to reject them. His state of mind had been the same as in chap. John 11:16, where, when Jesus hinted at giving life, he went rather to the opposite extreme, and thought of a death that would involve not only Lazarus but them all. Thus also now. He hears that Jesus is risen, and his first impulse is to say, ‘It cannot be: thick darkness cannot pass at once into such glorious light; the despair which is justified by what has happened cannot at once be transformed into inextinguishable confidence and hope.’ This depth of feeling prepared him for the completeness of the revulsion that now took place. For a week he had been able to meditate on all that he had both seen and heard. We cannot doubt that during that time the sayings of his Lord about His resurrection, as well as His death, would all return to his memory. He would see that what was said to have happened had been foretold; after all it was not to be rejected as impossible. He would think with himself what kind or amount of proof could convince him that the fact was true; and he would be unable to fall upon any harder proof than that which his incredulity had suggested in the moment of its first strength. But, if that proof can be given, then how powerfully would be feel the injustice which by his doubting he had done his Master! With what force would intimations, once dark but now bright in the light of the supposed Resurrection, come home to him! His very highest expectations would seem to him to have been warranted, and more than warranted, by the facts. We need not wonder that, having passed through a week so rich in training power, Thomas, when he did behold the Risen Lord, should have leaped at once from his former unbelief to faith in its highest stage, or that he should have exclaimed to Jesus, ‘My Lord and my God.’ It may even be doubted if, before this confession was made, he found it necessary to put his finger into the print of the nails or his hand into the wounded side. It was enough to ‘see’ (John 20:29).

One other remark may be made. Those who study the structure of the Fourth Gospel will hardly fail to trace in the incident thus placed at the close of its narrative the tendency of the Evangelist to return upon his own early steps. He had begun with ‘the Word’ who ‘was God;’ he closes with this highest truth accepted and ratified by those to whom the revelation was given. The last witness borne by one of them in the body of the Gospel narrative is, ‘My Lord and my God!

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 20:28". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-20.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

John 20:28. Grotius, following Tertullian, Ambrose, Cyril and others, is of opinion that Thomas availed himself of the offered test: surely it is psychologically more probable that the test he had insisted on as alone sufficient is now repudiated, and that he at once exclaims, . His faith returns with a rebound and utters itself in a confession in which the gospel culminates. The words are not a mere exclamation of surprise. That is forbidden by ; they mean “Thou art my Lord and my God”. The repeated pronoun lends emphasis. In Pliny’s letter to Trajan (112 A.D.) he describes the Christians as singing hymns to Christ as God. Our Lord does not reject Thomas’ confession; but (John 20:29) reminds him that there is a higher faith than that which springs from visual evidence: . Jesus would have been better pleased with a faith which did not require the evidence of sense: a faith founded on the perception that God was in Christ, and therefore He could not die; a faith in His Messiahship which argued that He must live to carry on the work of His Kingdom. The saying is cited as another instance of the care with which the various origins and kinds of faith are distinguished in this gospel.

 

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on John 20:28". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/john-20.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

My Lord and my God. First testimony to the Deity of the risen Lord. Possibly Thomas was using the words of Psalms 86:15, which in the Septuagint read Kurie ho Theos, and claiming forgiveness for his unbelief on the ground of Exodus 34:6, to which this verse of the Psalm refers.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 20:28". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-20.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And Thomas answered and said unto him, My Lord and my God.

[And]. This "And" is evidently no part of the genuine text.

Thomas answered and said unto him, My Lord and my God. That Thomas did not do what Jesus invited him to do, and what he had made the condition of his believing, seems plain from John 20:29 - "Because thou hast seen Me thou hast believed." He is overpowered, and the glory of Christ now breaks upon him in a flood. His exclamation surpasses all that had been yet uttered, nor can it be surpassed by anything that ever will be uttered in earth or heaven. On the striking parallel in Nathanael, sea on John 1:49. The Socinian evasion of the supreme divinity of Christ here manifestly taught-as if it were a mere call upon Gad in a fit of astonishment-is beneath notice, except for the profanity which it charges upon this disciple, and the straits to which it shows themselves reduced.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 20:28". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-20.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(28) Thomas answered and said unto him.—It is implied that he did not make use of the tests which his Master offered him, but that he at once expressed the fulness of his conviction. This is confirmed by the words of the next verse, “Because thou hast seen Me.”

My Lord and my God.—These words are preceded by “said unto him,” and are followed by “because thou hast seen Me, thou hast believed;” and the words “my Lord” can only be referred to Christ. (Comp. John 20:13.) The sentence cannot therefore, without violence to the context, be taken as an exclamation addressed to God, and is to be understood in the natural meaning of a confession by the Apostle that his Lord was also God.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 20:28". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-20.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And Thomas answered and said unto him, My Lord and my God.
My Lord
The disbelief of the apostle is the means of furnishing us with a full and satisfactory demonstration of the resurrection of our Lord. Throughout the divine dispensations every doctrine and ever important truth is gradually revealed; and here we have a conspicuous instance of the progressive system. An angel first declares the glorious event; the empty sepulchre confirms the women's report. Christ's appearance to Mary Magdalene shewed that he was alive; that to the disciples at Emmaus proved that it was at the least the spirit of Christ; that to the eleven shewed the reality of his body; and the conviction given to Thomas proved it the self-same body that had been crucified. Incredulity itself is satisfied; and the convinced apostle exclaims, in the joy of his heart, "My Lord and my God!"
16,31; 5:23; 9:35-38; Psalms 45:6,11; 102:24-28; 118:24-28; Isaiah 7:14; 9:6; Isaiah 25:9; 40:9-11; Jeremiah 23:5,6; Malachi 3:1; Matthew 14:33; Luke 24:52; Acts 7:59,60; 1 Timothy 3:16; Revelation 5:9-14
Reciprocal: Joshua 5:14 - my lord;  Psalm 8:1 - our;  Psalm 16:2 - thou hast;  Psalm 35:23 - my God;  Psalm 97:10 - preserveth;  Daniel 10:16 - my Lord;  Hosea 9:17 - My God;  Matthew 2:2 - worship;  Matthew 22:42 - What;  Matthew 22:44 - my Lord;  Matthew 28:9 - worshipped;  Luke 1:43 - my;  Luke 23:42 - Lord;  John 1:1 - the Word was;  John 1:34 - this;  John 1:49 - thou;  John 6:69 - we believe;  John 9:38 - Lord;  John 10:36 - I am;  John 11:27 - Yea;  John 21:2 - Thomas;  John 21:7 - It is;  Acts 9:20 - that;  Romans 1:3 - his Son;  Romans 4:19 - being;  2 Corinthians 1:19 - the Son;  Philippians 2:6 - thought;  Philippians 2:11 - is Lord;  Philippians 3:8 - my;  Hebrews 1:8 - O God;  Hebrews 7:14 - Our Lord;  1 John 5:20 - This is

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 20:28". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-20.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Ver. 28. "And Thomas answered and said unto Him, My Lord and my God."

It runs εἶπεν αὐτῷ: therefore "My Lord and my God" is a concise expression of deep feeling, instead of "Thou art my Lord and my God." We have here the first passage in which Jesus is expressly by His disciples called God,—a confession which was soon to be the common one of the whole Christian Church; as Pliny, in the Epistle to Trajan, records that the Christians sang hymns to Christ as God. Thomas utters here, as his confession, only what Jesus had constantly set before His disciples as His doctrine. When, for example, He said to Philip, ch. John 14:9, "He that seeth Me hath seen the Father," and ver. 10, "I am in the Father, and the Father in Me," He taught that the existences of the Father and the Son were perfectly co-extensive, and that in Himself dwelt all the fulness of the Godhead. Much vain industry has been spent in evading this confession of Thomas, by those who do not accept the doctrine of Christ's divinity. He addressed to Christ precisely the same words which are elsewhere addressed to the supreme God: e.g. Psalms 35:23, "Stir up Thyself, and awake to my judgment, even unto my cause, my God and Lord," ὁ θεός μου καὶ ὁ κύριός μου, Sirach 1:1, ἐξομολογήσομαί σοι, κύριε βασιλεῦ, καὶ αἰνέσω θεόν. We are in a sphere in which the boundary between God and the creature is drawn with the most rigid precision: comp. Deuteronomy 6:4; Mark 12:29-30. The address of Thomas would have been blasphemy if there had been in the Father's essence anything that came not to manifestation in the Son. That Thomas, in the excitement of the moment, passed from one extreme to another, cannot be asserted by any one who observes that Christ accepted his invocation at once. (Calvin: Never would He have suffered that the honour of the Father should be wrested and transferred to Himself.) "Thou hast believed," referring to Himself, shows that to recognise in Christ the Lord and God, and specifically His own Lord and God, is the necessary condition of faith. (Calvin: He emphatically calls Him his own twice, to show that he spoke from a living and solemn sense of faith.) To talk of an "exaggerated cry," is altogether out of the question, in relation to a Gospel which everywhere discloses a tendency to place the divinity of Christ in the clearest light.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on John 20:28". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/john-20.html.