Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Joshua 10:15

Then Joshua and all Israel with him returned to the camp to Gilgal.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Adoni-Zedek;   Amorites;   Captive;   Debir;   Hebron;   Jerusalem;   War;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Jerusalem;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Adonizedek;   Gilgal;   Makkedah;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Gilgal;   Tabernacle;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Prayer;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Adoni-Zedec;   Joshua, the Book of;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Amorites;   Hoham;   Japhia;   Joshua, the Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Adoni-Bezek;   Adoni-Zedek;   Israel;   Joshua;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Adonizedec ;   Eglon ;   Gibeon ;   Gilgal;   Jebusites ;   Lachish ;   Makkedah ;   Sun;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Adonizedek;   Journeyings of israel from egypt to canaan;   Lachish;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Adonize'dek;   Makke'dah;   Tabernacle;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Conquest of Canaan;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Gilgal;   Hoham;   Joshua, Book of;   Kitto Biblical Cyclopedia - Adonizedek;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Jebusites;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

And Joshua returned - unto the camp to Gilgal - That the Israelitish army did not return to the camp at Gilgal till after the hanging of the five kings and the destruction of their cities, is sufficiently evident from the subsequent parts of this chapter. When all this business was done, and not before, they returned unto the camp to Gilgal; see Joshua 10:43. This verse is omitted by the Septuagint and by the Anglo-Saxon; and it does not appear to have existed in the ancient hexaplar versions; it stands in its proper place in Joshua 10:43, and is not only useless where it is, but appears to be an encumbrance to the narrative. Should it be considered as genuine and in its proper place, I would propose that מקדה makkedah should be read instead of גלגלה gilgalah, for we find from Joshua 10:21; that Joshua had a temporary camp there. Then Joshua returned, and all Israel with him, unto the camp to Makkedah; after which we may suppose that Joshua having secured the cave, sent some detachments to scour the country and cut off all the remaining straggling Canaanites; when this was done they also returned to the camp at Makkedah, as is related Joshua 10:21, and when the business was completed they struck the camp at Makkedah, and all returned to their fortified camp at Gilgal, Joshua 10:43.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Joshua 10:15". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/joshua-10.html. 1832.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And Joshua returned, and all Israel with him, unto the camp to Gilgal. That is, he thought to have returned, had determined upon it, and prepared for it, but was prevented by hearing that the five kings had hid themselves in a cave at Makkedah; which he ordered to be stopped up till the people had finished the pursuit of their enemies, when he destroyed Makkedah, and which led him on to the conquest of other places before he returned; or else this verse stands not in its proper place, or is superfluous, since the same is expressed Joshua 10:43; after all the above mentioned was done; the Septuagint version leaves it out.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Joshua 10:15". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/joshua-10.html. 1999.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And Joshua returned, and all Israel with him, unto the camp to Gilgal.

Joshua returned — Not upon the same day, but after he had dispatched the matter which here follows; as appears by verse43, where the very same words are repeated. And they are put here to close the general discourse of the fight which begun verse10, and ends here; which being done he particularly describes some remarkable passages, and closeth them with the same words.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Joshua 10:15". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/joshua-10.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Joshua 10:15 And Joshua returned, and all Israel with him, unto the camp to Gilgal.

Ver. 15. And Joshua returned,] viz., After he had finished all that is related in this whole chapter, as in Joshua 10:43. Some render it, Itaque reditum adornabat Ioshua.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Joshua 10:15". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/joshua-10.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Ver. 15. And Joshua returned, and all Israel—to Gilgal That is to say, he issued orders for so doing; but from ver. 43 it appears, that he did not, in fact, return till he had forced the five kings to come from the cave where they had taken refuge. It might be rendered, and Joshua was about to return to Gilgal. The Scripture sometimes mentions as done, what was designed to be done. See Genesis 37:21.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Joshua 10:15". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/joshua-10.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Not immediately, or upon the same day, but after he had despatched the matter which here follows; as appears by Joshua 10:43, where the very same words are repeated, to show that that was the meaning of them. And they are put here to close the general discourse of the fight, which begun Joshua 10:10, and ends here; which being done, he particularly describes some remarkable passages, and closeth them with the same words.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Joshua 10:15". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/joshua-10.html. 1685.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

And Joshua returned, and all Israel with him, to the camp to Gilgal.’

As will be noted from what follows this statement seems to be in an unusual place, for the following verses continue with the pursuit. However it follows the extract from the Book of Jasher and is therefore clearly intended to close off that section, seen as an independent insertion. Joshua 10:16 is then to be seen as following Joshua 10:11. Putting the insertion (Joshua 10:12-15) in this place probably resulted from a desire to connect it with the other unusual weather phenomena. The point here is that for Joshua and Israel the whole venture ended successfully after the miraculous weather conditions, with the return to base camp, but in the context of the whole narrative the timing connects with Joshua 10:43.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Joshua 10:15". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/joshua-10.html. 2013.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

15.And Joshua returned — This must be regarded as the close of the quotation from the book of Jasher. The writer of that book drops all the further acts of the campaign, and speaks of its conclusion. See note introductory to Joshua 10:12.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Joshua 10:15". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/joshua-10.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Joshua 10:15. And Joshua returned — Not immediately, but after he had performed what is related in the following part of this chapter, as appears by Joshua 10:43, where the very same words are repeated.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Joshua 10:15". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/joshua-10.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Galgal. Masius supposes, that here the quotation from the book of the just terminates. The Roman and Alexandrian Septuagint place this verse at the end of the chapter. (Calmet) --- Grabe has it in both places with a star, to shew that it is taken from Theodotion. (Haydock) --- In effect, Josue did not return to his camp till he had completed the business of the day, by destroying the five kings. After which, he proceeded to conquer that part of the country. He might have designed to return, (Calmet) and even have begun his march, (Du Hamel) when he was diverted from proceeding, by the news that the kings had been discovered. So we often say, that a person does what he is on the point of doing. See Genesis xxxvii. 21., and Numbers xxxiv. 25.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Joshua 10:15". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/joshua-10.html. 1859.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(15) Unto the camp to Gilgal.—This verse relates by anticipation, in the words of the Book of Jasher (Heb., Yâshar, upright), what we find in the narrative of Joshua at Joshua 10:43, viz., the return to Gilgal at the close of this campaign. The immediate return, at the end of the miraculous day’s operations, was to Makkedah, not to Gilgal (see Joshua 10:21).

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Joshua 10:15". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/joshua-10.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And Joshua returned, and all Israel with him, unto the camp to Gilgal.
6,43
Reciprocal: Joshua 10:21 - to the camp

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Joshua 10:15". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/joshua-10.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

15.And Joshua returned, etc This verse is not inserted in its proper place, (100) for shortly after the end of the battle is added, and the punishment inflicted on the kings, which was subsequent to the battle. We are then told of the encampment in Makkedah, and at last, in the end of the chapter, the return to Gilgal, which was introduced at the beginning without regard to the order of time, is repeated. Hence the narrative of the flight and concealment of the kings is connected with the former transactions. For having been informed during the heat of the battle that they were hiding in a cave, Joshua, fearing that if he were to set about capturing them, the others might escape, prudently contented himself with ordering the mouth of the cave to be blocked up with large stones, and setting sentinels over them, that being thus shut up, as it were in prison, they might at a fit time be brought forth and put to death. Hence, too, it appears that the army of the enemy was very large, because although the Israelites pressed closely upon them in their flight, and the sun himself gave an additional period for slaying them, it was impossible, notwithstanding, to prevent numbers of them from escaping into fortified cities. The divine assistance afforded to the Israelites was, however, sufficiently attested by the fact that they continued till they were wearied slaying at will all whom they met, and then returned safe. For the expression, that no one dared to move the tongue, implies that the Israelites gained a bloodless victory, (101) as if they had gone forth not to fight, but merely to slay.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Joshua 10:15". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/joshua-10.html. 1840-57.