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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 1:29

But she was very perplexed at this statement, and kept pondering what kind of salutation this was.

Adam Clarke Commentary

She was troubled at his saying - The glorious appearance of the heavenly messenger filled her with amazement; and she was puzzled to find out the purport of his speech.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 1:29". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-1.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Troubled at his saying - Disturbed or perplexed at what he said. It was so unexpected, so sudden, so extraordinary, and was so high an honor, that she was filled with anxious thoughts, and did not know what to make of it.

Cast in her mind - Thought, or revolved in her mind.

What manner of salutation - What this salutation could mean.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 1:29". "Barnes' Notes on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-1.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

But she was greatly troubled at the saying, and cast in her mind what manner of salutation this might be.

The awesome presence of the mighty Gabriel was more than enough to strike terror into the heart of this young maiden in the village of Nazareth.


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 1:29". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-1.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And when she saw him,.... The Persic version renders it, "when Mary saw the angel"; which expresses the true sense of the words, The Vulgate Latin reads, "when she heard"; i.e. the salutation:

she was troubled at his saying; at his speaking to her; she was surprised at the sight of him, and more at what he said to her,

and cast in her mind, or thought and reasoned within herself,

what manner of salutation this should be; for it was not usual with the Jews for a man to use any salutation to a woman; with them it was not lawful to be done in any shape or form; not by a messenger, nor even by her own husbandF21T. Bab. Kiddushin, fol. 70. 1,2. Maimon. Hilch. Issure Biah, c. 21. ; so that Mary might well be thrown into a concern what should be the meaning of this; and especially, that she should be addressed in such language, and saluted as a peculiar favourite of God, and blessed among women,


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 1:29". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-1.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And when she saw [him], she was b troubled at his saying, and cast in her mind what manner of salutation this should be.

(b) Moved at the strangeness of the matter.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Luke 1:29". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/luke-1.html. 1599-1645.

John Lightfoot's Commentary on the Gospels

29. And when she saw him, she was troubled at his saying, and cast in her mind what manner of salutation this should be.

[Was troubled, &c.] I. It was very rare and unusual for men to salute any women; at least if that be true in Kiddushin. Rabh Judah, the president of the academy of Pombeditha, went to Rabh Nachman, rector of the academy of Neharde, and after some talk amongst themselves, "Saith Rabh Nachman, Let my daughter Doneg bring some drink, that we may drink together. Saith the other, Samuel saith, We must not use the ministry of a woman. But this is a little girl, saith Nachman. The other answers, But Samuel saith, We ought not to use the ministry of any woman at all. Wilt thou please, saith Nachman, to salute Lelith my wife? But, saith he, Samuel saith, The voice of a woman is filthy nakedness. But, saith Nachman, thou mayest salute her by a messenger. To whom the other; Samuel saith, They do not salute any woman. Thou mayest salute her, saith Nachman, by a proxy her husband. But Samuel saith, saith he again, They do not salute a woman at all."

II. It was still much more rare and unusual to give such a kind of salutation as this, Hail, thou that art highly favoured, by which title Gabriel had saluted Daniel of old: with this exception, that it was terror enough so much as to see an angel.


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Bibliography
Lightfoot, John. "Commentary on Luke 1:29". "John Lightfoot Commentary on the Gospels". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jlc/luke-1.html. 1675.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Cast in her mind (διελογιζετοdielogizeto). Imperfect indicative. Note aorist διεταραχτηdietarachthē Common verb for reckoning up different reasons. She was both upset and puzzled.


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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright © Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 1:29". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-1.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

The Fourfold Gospel

But she was greatly troubled at the saying, and cast in her mind what manner of salutation this might be1.

  1. But she was greatly troubled at the saying, and cast in her mind what manner of salutation this might be. Whether it meant a present sorrow or joy, for God's salutations all mean joy, but usually is in the distant future (Hebrews 12:11; 2 Corinthians 4:17,18).


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 1:29". "The Fourfold Gospel". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-1.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

29.When she had seen him, she was agitated Luke does not say that she was agitated by the presence of the angel, but by his address. Why then does he also mention his presence? (24) The reason, I think, is this. Perceiving in the angel something of heavenly glory, she was seized with sudden dread arising out of reverence for God. She was agitated, because she felt that she had received a salutation, not from a mortal man, but from an angel of God. But Luke does not say that she was so agitated as to have lost recollection. On the contrary, he mentions an indication of an attentive and composed mind; for he afterwards adds, and was considering what that salutation would be: that is, what was its object, and what was its meaning. It instantly occurred to her that the angel had not been sent for a trifling purpose. This example reminds us, first, that we ought not to be careless observers of the works of God; and, secondly, that our consideration of them ought to be regulated by fear and reverence.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Luke 1:29". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/luke-1.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

29 And when she saw him, she was troubled at his saying, and cast in her mind what manner of salutation this should be.

Ver. 29. She was troubled at his saying] Affect not the vain praises of men, saith one. The blessed Virgin was troubled when truly praised by an angel. They shall be praised by angels in heaven who have eschewed the praises of men on earth.

What manner of salutation] Cuius esset (saith one interpreter) voluit enim probate spiritum. Qualis et quanta, saith another; Id est, quam honorifica et magnifica, ac proinde supra sortem suam posita. What an honourable salutation it was, and more than she could acknowledge.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 1:29". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-1.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Luke 1:29. She was troubled, &c.— She was disturbed at his discourse, and reasoned with herself, or revolved in her mind, what this salutation should mean. Heylin, and Doddridge.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Luke 1:29". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/luke-1.html. 1801-1803.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 1:29. διεταράχθη, she was troubled) Her being troubled arose from the apparition itself ( δὲ ἰδοῦσα, when she saw him). Therefore she does not seem to have been previously accustomed to apparitions. [All things, in the case of the blessed Virgin, both what was foretold to herself, and what ensued subsequently, befel her without her expecting them. But if her conception, as the tradition of several members of the Roman Church represents, had been immaculate, she could have hardly accounted herself, however superlatively modest, in such an ordinary position (so entirely undistinguished from ordinary men and women).—V. g.]— ποταπὸδ εἴη, of what kind may be) The formulæ themselves, which had been addressed to her, hail, and, the Lord with thee, were ordinary salutations; but from the peculiar and extraordinary titles which the angel added, Mary understood that the formulæ, especially as being conjoined with these titles, were employed with an extraordinary [distinguishing] and new force. In fact, in all the recorded apparitions of angels, there is no other instance occurs of such a salutation. Mary not only wondered, but also cast in her mind, of what kind might be, what was the meaning, and what the drift of this salutation.


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Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 1:29". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-1.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

It seemeth that she did not only hear a voice, and saw an ordinary appearance, but the appearance of the angel was attended with some manifestation of the glory of God, which affected her, and made her wonder what the meaning of this should be, that God should send an angel to her, and with such a kind of salutation.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 1:29". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-1.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Troubled-case in her mind; perplexed at such a strange salutation, and wondered what it could mean.


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Bibliography
Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 1:29". "Family Bible New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-1.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

29. ἡ δὲ ἐπὶ τῷ λόγῳ διεταράχθη. ‘But she was greatly troubled at the saying.’

ποταπός. ‘Of what kind.’ The salutation was to her not only astonishing, but enigmatical.


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Bibliography
"Commentary on Luke 1:29". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/luke-1.html. 1896.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

29. Saw him—The phrase, when she saw him, being absent from many manuscripts, is of doubtful authenticity, but the angel’s visibility seems to be implied.

Troubled at his saying—There is a meek composure in the words of Mary, quite in contrast with the hasty language of Zacharias. She utters no bold word demanding test or proof; and she closes with complete submission to her trial and to her destiny of honour.

Cast in her mind Conjectured, debated in her mind.

What manner—What the nature.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 1:29". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-1.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘But she was greatly troubled at the saying, and cast in her mind what manner of salutation this might be.’

The words of Gabriel ‘greatly troubled’ her. The word is stronger than that used in Luke 1:12. His words clearly signified that something great and wonderful would be expected of her, and possibly her mind flashed back to others who had had angelic visitations, Sara the prospective mother of Isaac who had had to be rebuked because she had not believed (Genesis 18:10-15), and the wife of Manoah (Judges 13:3-5; Judges 13:9), with all, of both joy and sorrow, that had resulted from her experience. Every woman in Israel knew of these great women of the past and what they had undergone. And she did not feel that she was worthy or able to face up to the demands that might be made on her. After all she was merely a village girl in her mid-teens. Desperately worried she sought in her mind for what the angel might be expecting of her. After all there was little that she could do, except be a good mother.


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Bibliography
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 1:29". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-1.html. 2013.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 1:29. Greatly troubled; not at the sight of the angel, but at the saying. This is further indicated by the clause: What manner of salutation this might be. Had she been born without sin, she would have been sufficiently conscious of her fellowship with a holy God, to understand such a salutation at once.


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Bibliography
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 1:29". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-1.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 1:29. διεταράχθη: assuming that ιδοῦσα (T.R.) is no part of the true text, Godet thinks that Mary saw nothing, and that it was only the word of the angel that disturbed her. It is certainly the latter that is specified as the cause of trouble. The salutation troubled her because she felt that it meant something important, the precise nature of which ( ποταπὸς) did not appear. And yet on the principle that in supernatural experiences the subjective and the objective correspond, she must have had a guess.


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Bibliography
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 1:29". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-1.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

When she had heard. In the Greek text, when she had seen; as if she also saw the angel, as St. Ambrose observed. (Witham)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Luke 1:29". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/luke-1.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

when she saw him. Omitted by all

the texts. cast in her mind = beganto reason, or was reasoning. Imperfect Tense.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 1:29". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-1.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And when she saw him, she was troubled at his saying, and cast in her mind what manner of salutation this should be.

And when she saw him, she was troubled ...


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 1:29". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-1.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(29) she was troubled at his saying.—The same word is used as had been used of Zacharias. With Mary, as with him, the first feeling was one of natural terror. Who was the strange visitor, and what did the strange greeting mean?


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 1:29". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-1.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And when she saw him, she was troubled at his saying, and cast in her mind what manner of salutation this should be.
she was
12; Mark 6:49,50; 16:5,6; Acts 10:4
and cast
66; 2:19,51
what
Judges 6:13-15; 1 Samuel 9:20,21; Acts 10:4,17

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 1:29". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-1.html.

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