Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 13:28

In that place there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth when you see Abraham and Isaac and Jacob and all the prophets in the kingdom of God, but yourselves being thrown out.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Abraham;   Despondency;   Gnashing of Teeth;   Isaac;   Jesus, the Christ;   Jesus Continued;   Judgment;   Opportunity;   Remorse;   Reprobacy;   Sorrow;   Teeth;   Wicked (People);   Scofield Reference Index - Parables;   Thompson Chain Reference - Admission, Exclusion;   Exclusion;   The Topic Concordance - Kingdom of God;  
Dictionaries:
Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Eternal Punishment;   Hell;   Kingdom of God;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Esau;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Isaac;   Luke, Gospel of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Matthew, Gospel According to;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Abraham;   Bosom ;   Discourse;   Dominion (2);   Fathers;   Gnashing of Teeth ;   Heaven ;   Isaac;   Israel, Israelite;   Jacob;   Kingdom of God (or Heaven);   Lazarus;   Metaphors;   Power;   Salvation Save Saviour;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chief parables and miracles in the bible;   Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Teeth;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Abraham;   Gnash;   Resurrection;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - New Testament;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Abraham, and Isaac, etc. - See on Matthew 8:12; (note), where the figures and allusions made use of here are particularly explained.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 13:28". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-13.html. 1832.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

There shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth,.... See Gill on Matthew 8:12. This will be upon hearing the above sentence and character, "depart from me", &c. and will be increased,

when ye shall see Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob: whose offspring they were, and to whom they stood related according to the flesh; and of descent, from whom they boasted, and even trusted in it, thinking themselves the favourites of heaven, and expecting to be admitted into the kingdom of God, on account of it: sad will be the disappointment of such persons; a being born of religious parents, will neither give right unto, nor meetness for eternal glory; regeneration is not of blood:

and all the prophets in the kingdom of God; whose prophecies were transmitted to them, and whose books they had in their hands, and read; and who desired to see and hear what they did, and which they now plead, and yet they did not enjoy, but were nevertheless happy: and

you yourselves thrust out: with indignation and contempt, with shame and "ignominy", as the Persic version adds; not suffered to go in with them, though their sons and successors; but bid to depart, and ordered to be for ever separated from them, as only fit company for devils and damned spirits.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 13:28". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-13.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

8 There shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth, when ye shall see Abraham, and Isaac, and Jacob, and all the prophets, in the kingdom of God, and you [yourselves] thrust out.

(8) The casting off of the Jews and the calling of the Gentiles is foretold.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Luke 13:28". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/luke-13.html. 1599-1645.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

There (εκειekei). Out there, outside the house whence they are driven.

When ye shall see (οταν οπσηστεhotan opsēsthe). First aorist middle subjunctive (of a late aorist ωπσαμηνōpsamēn) of οραωhoraō though οπσεστεopsesthe (future middle) in margin of Westcott and Hort, unless we admit here a “future” subjunctive like Byzantine Greek (after Latin).

And yourselves cast forth without (υμας δε εκβαλλομενους εχωhumās de ekballomenous exō). Present passive participle, continuous action, “you being cast out” with the door shut. See notes on Matthew 8:11. for this same picture.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 13:28". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-13.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

There shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth, when ye shall see Abraham, and Isaac, and Jacob, and all the prophets, in the kingdom of God, and you yourselves thrust out.

Matthew 8:11.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 13:28". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-13.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

There shall be the weeping and the gnashing of teeth1, when ye shall see Abraham, and Isaac, and Jacob, and all the prophets, in the kingdom of God2, and yourselves cast forth without.

  1. There shall be the weeping and the gnashing of teeth. See .

  2. When ye shall see Abraham, and Isaac, and Jacob, and all the prophets, in the kingdom of God. See .

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 13:28". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-13.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

28 There shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth, when ye shall see Abraham, and Isaac, and Jacob, and all the prophets, in the kingdom of God, and you yourselves thrust out.

Ver. 28. See Matthew 8:12; Matthew 13:42; Matthew 24:51.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 13:28". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-13.html. 1865-1868.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 13:28. ἐκεῖ, there) in that place, to which ye shall be commanded to depart. [See that thou dost in due time reflect on that a “terror of the Lord,” lest hereafter thou shouldest in actual fact be forced to know it by bitter experience.—V. g.]— ὄψησθε) when ye shall see, but not taste [their blessedness]. A sight full of misery. See ch. Luke 16:23. The ungodly, on the contrary, shall be a festive sight to the saints:(132), Isaiah 66:23-24.— ἀβραὰμ, Abraham) The patriarchs and all the prophets looked to Christ; and whosoever do not follow their faith, shall not recline at the heavenly feast with them.— πάντας, all) All the prophets were saints. The Jews used to boast themselves of these, though their fathers had rejected them. There is here, as also in Luke 13:29, a softening down of the apprehension which the ‘fewness’ of the saved might create: see Luke 13:23.— βασιλείᾳ, the kingdom) Luke 13:29.— ἐκβαλλομένους, persons who are being cast out) The Present. The weeping shall forthwith begin.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 13:28". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-13.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Ver. 28,29. We have the same Matthew 8:11,12, only he saith only from the east and west: See Poole on "Matthew 8:11", See Poole on "Matthew 8:12".

Weeping and gnashing of teeth, are usual expressions by which the pains of the damned are expressed, especially by the evangelist Matthew, Matthew 8:12 Matthew 13:42,50 22:13 24:51 25:30. One cause of this vexation of spirit, expressed under this notion, is the Jews’ sight of the rest and happiness that their relations, nay, some to whom they upon earth were enemies, should enjoy in heaven; nay, which some which were heathens should enjoy there; whereas they, who took themselves to be the only church, and to have the same right to the kingdom of heaven that children have to the inheritances of their fathers, should be cast out, as having no portion there.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 13:28". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-13.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

плач и скрежет зубов См. пояснение к Мф. 22:13.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 13:28". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-13.html.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

“There will be the weeping and the gnashing of teeth, when you shall see Abraham, and Isaac, and Jacob, and all the prophets, within the Kingly Rule of God, and yourselves cast forth outside.”

Those who have found the door closed against them will then have the chagrin of seeing all those whom they had previously honoured entering as faithful servants (Luke 12:44) into the heavenly Kingly Rule of God, while they themselves are cast out and put with the unfaithful (Luke 12:46). They will be in such anguish at it that they will ‘weep and gnash their teeth’ (not here a picture of Hell, but of deep and unbearable disappointment). Some, however, see it as gnashing their teeth in anger at the One Who had done this to them, as they ‘look in through the door that was closed against them’ and see what they have missed. But it is likely that we have now moved on from the parable (and besides the door was closed).

‘Weeping and gnashing of teeth.’ Weeping expresses sorrow and regret (see Luke 6:25; Acts 20:37; James 4:9; James 5:1), the gnashing or grinding of the teeth pictures anger and hatred (compare Job 16:10; Psalms 35:16; Psalms 37:12; Psalms 112:10; Lamentations 2:16; Acts 7:54)

‘Abraham, and Isaac, and Jacob, and all the prophets.’ Apart from Jesus and possibly John the Baptiser they had honoured the memory of all these great men. But while they honoured the faithful servants, they did not honour the lord of the house. It is their rejection of Jesus which has sealed their fate. It is no good looking back to figures of the past if we ignore the One Who towers above them all and Who is present with us to save. Their chagrin would be increased by the fact that they had always considered themselves to be sons of Abraham and therefore heirs of his promises, and now they were to be excluded from them.

‘Yourselves cast forth outside.’ The fact that they are ‘expelled’ demonstrates that this is not talking about the door that they refused to go through, or the door that was shut against them. As they had not passed through those they could not be ‘thrust forth’ from them. So these words are not to be seen as a continuation of the parable, but rather as an explanation of the consequences. They will be thrust out from any hope when they face judgment on their future, as with the servant in the parable (Luke 12:46).

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 13:28". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-13.html. 2013.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 13:28. , there; then, according to Euthy. Zig. ( , ). Kuinoel also takes it as an adverb of time in accordance with Hebraistic usage, and Bornemann cites instances from Greek authors of the same use of adverbs of place as adverbs of time. But there is not only verbally correct, but graphic: there, outside the door of the house where patriarchs and prophets feast, shall the excluded weep and gnash their teeth, all the more because they think they have a right, as belonging to the chosen race, to be within.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 13:28". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-13.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

weeping = the weeping. See note on Matthew 8:12.

when. Defining the special occasion.

see. App-133.

thrust out = being cast outside. This is the occasion referred to.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 13:28". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-13.html. 1909-1922.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

There shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth, when ye shall see Abraham, and Isaac, and Jacob, and all the prophets, in the kingdom of God, and you yourselves thrust out.
weeping
Psalms 112:10; Matthew 8:12; 13:42,50; 22:13; 24:51; 25:30
when
16:23; Matthew 8:11
the kingdom
14:15; 23:42,43; 2 Thessalonians 1:5; 2 Peter 1:11
you
10:15; Revelation 21:8; 22:15
Reciprocal: Exodus 11:6 - GeneralProverbs 21:15 - destruction;  Isaiah 65:14 - ye shall;  Matthew 20:16 - the last;  Matthew 21:41 - and will let out;  Luke 3:8 - We;  Luke 6:20 - for;  Luke 6:25 - mourn;  Acts 7:54 - they gnashed;  Hebrews 11:32 - the prophets;  Revelation 16:10 - they

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 13:28". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-13.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

28.When you shall see Abraham The Jews bore no resemblance to the holy fathers, and had no right to boast of being descended from them: yet nothing was more customary than to abuse the title of the Church. (474) Christ here assures them, that a bastard race, which has departed from the faith and piety of the fathers, has “no inheritance in the kingdom of God,” (Ephesians 5:5.) There is a silent but implied reproof, that those who were desirous to have companions in seeking salvation, did not endeavor to associate themselves with Abraham, and the prophets, and the holy fathers, instead of looking around among their contemporaries, who had degenerated greatly from their example into innumerable corruptions. “If you neglect (says he) to enter by the strait gate, because you are kept back by the great number of those who are going astray, do you not see that you are separated from the number of believers, and become involved with unbelievers?” If the aspect of the world now dazzles your eyes, the last day will cure you of this folly, but it will be too late: for you shall then know that you, and others like you, are excluded from the kingdom of God, and have no part with Abraham

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on Luke 13:28". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/luke-13.html. 1840-57.