Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 14:10

But when you are invited, go and recline at the last place, so that when the one who has invited you comes, he may say to you, ‘Friend, move up higher'; then you will have honor in the sight of all who are at the table with you.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Feasts;   Guest;   Humility;   Jesus, the Christ;   Presumption;   Respect;   Self-Exaltation;   Thompson Chain Reference - Humility;   Humility-Pride;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Entertainments;   Parables;   Presumption;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Parable;   Room;   Worship of God;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Ethics;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Humility;   Wealth;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Hospitality;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Banquets;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Banquet;   Luke, Gospel of;   Proverbs, Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Kingdom of God;   Matthew, Gospel According to;   Worship;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Ambition;   Discourse;   Equality;   Exaltation (2);   Meals;   Old Testament (Ii. Christ as Student and Interpreter of).;   Perfection (of Jesus);   Quotations (2);   Retribution (2);   Shame;   Unity (2);  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Jesus Christ (Part 2 of 2);   Meals;   Triclinium;   Wisdom;   Worship;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Akiba ben Joseph;  

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

The lowest room - The lowest seat at the table; showing that you are not desirous of distinctions, or greedy of that honor which may properly belong to you.

Shalt have worship - The word “worship” here means “honor.” They who are sitting with you shall treat you with respect. They will learn your rank by your being invited nearer to the head of the table, and it will be better to learn it thus than by putting yourself forward. They will do you honor because you have shown a humble spirit.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 14:10". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-14.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

But when thou art bidden,.... To an entertainment, and the time is come,

go and sit down in the lowest room: place thyself at the lower end of the table, or in the most inferior seat; which will show humility and lowliness of mind, and prevent shame and mortification; since there can be no putting into a lower place, and there may be an advance to an higher:

that when he that bade thee cometh; into the dining room, and observe in what place thou art:

he may say unto thee, friend, go up higher; to a more honourable seat at table, pointing to it, and saying, there is such a seat empty, go up and take it, it best becomes thee:

then shalt thou have worship; or glory, as the word signifies; honour and esteem, instead of shame and blushing; not only from the master of the feast,

but in the presence of them that sit at meat with thee; and from them, who will take notice of the honour done thee, and will entertain an high opinion of thee, and commend thee for thine humility and modesty. Advice, like to this, is given by Solomon in Proverbs 25:6 and which is explained by the Jews in like manner as hereF11Abot R. Nathan, c. 25. fol. 6. 4. :

"Ben Azzai used to say, descend, from thy place two or three degrees, and sit; it is better that it should be said to thee, עלה, "go up", than that it should be said to thee, descend, as it is said in Proverbs 25:7.'

Which is elsewhereF12Vajikra Rabba, sect. 1. fol. 146. 4. Vid. Shemot Rabba, sect. 45. fol. 142. 1. thus expressed:

"R. Akiba taught it (or expounded, Proverbs 25:7) in the name of R. Simeon ben Azzai, remove from thy place two or three seats, and sit until it is said to thee, עלה, "go up"; but do not go up (i.e. first,) for it will be said to thee descend; it is better that it should be said to thee go up, go up, than that it should be said to thee go down, go down: and Ben Hillell used to say, my humiliation is my exaltation, and my exaltation is my humiliation.'

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:10". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-14.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Friend — said to the modest guest only, not the proud one (Luke 14:9) [Bengel].

worship — honor. The whole of this is but a reproduction of Proverbs 25:6, Proverbs 25:7. But it was reserved for the matchless Teacher to utter articulately, and apply to the regulation of the minutest features of social life, such great laws of the Kingdom of God, as that of Luke 14:11.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 14:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-14.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Sit down (αναπεσεanapese). Second aorist active imperative of αναπιπτωanapiptō to fall up or back, to lie back or down. Late Greek word for ανακλινωanaklinō (cf. κατακλινωkataklinō in Luke 14:8).

He that hath bidden thee (ο κεκληκως σεho keklēkōs se). Perfect active participle as in Luke 14:12 (τωι κεκληκοτιtōi keklēkoti) with which compare ο καλεσαςho kalesas in Luke 14:9 (first aorist active participle).

He may say (ερειerei). The future indicative with ιναhina does occur in the Koiné (papyri) and so in the N.T. (Robertson, Grammar, p. 984).

Go up higher (προσαναβητιprosanabēthi). Second aorist active imperative second singular of προσαναβαινωprosanabainō an old double compound verb, but here only in the N.T. Probably, “Come up higher,” because the call comes from the host and because of προςpros f0).

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright © Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 14:10". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-14.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Sit down ( ἀνάπεσε )

Lit., lay yourself back.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 14:10". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-14.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

The Fourfold Gospel

But when thou art bidden, go and sit down in the lowest place1; that when he that hath bidden thee cometh, he may say to thee, Friend, go up higher: then shalt thou have glory in the presence of all that sit at meat with thee.

  1. But when thou art bidden, go and sit down in the lowest place. The words here used by our Lord teach how to avoid earthly shame and to obtain worldly honor. But they form a parable which is intended to teach the great spiritual truth that true humility leads to exaltation.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
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J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 14:10". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-14.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Then shalt thou have worship, &c. This shows that it was not our Savior's design, in these instructions, to teach men to be indifferent to the respect and honorable regard of their fellow-men, but to show them the true way to attain it,--namely, by modest and unassuming deportment, and by treating others with respect.

Luke 14:12-14. That is, the kindness and hospitality, which the wealthy have it in their power to bestow, are not to be regarded as Christian virtues, except when they are rendered to those who cannot make any return.

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Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Luke 14:10". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/luke-14.html. 1878.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

IN THE LOWEST ROOM

‘Go and sit down in the lowest room.’

Luke 14:10

He had a right to say these words, Who, when all the chambers of creation were open to Him, came and ‘sat down in the lowest room!’ And, in this lone world of ours, where was He ever found, but in its ‘lowest room’?

I. The humiliation of Jesus was the basis of His exaltation; and that which obtained in the Head is only being acted, over and over again, in each one of His members; hence the evangelical power and truth which lieth in the words, ‘He that humbleth himself shall be exalted.’

II. All the unhappinesses we have ever known in life have been from not taking ‘the lowest room.’

(a) There is one man—he has fallen into sin, and therefore he is wretched. But why did he fall into that sin? He did not take sufficiently abasing views of his own utter weakness.

(b) There is another. He cannot succeed. Life, in all its greatnesses, has been a failure to him. And why? He never went deep enough.

(c) There is another. He is conscious that he has no influence. He can do no good. And why? He has yet to learn that the secret of power is sympathy, and that the soul of sympathy is to stoop, and to be little, and to make self nothing.

III. Most persons agree that their earliest religious days were their happiest and best.—May not this be traced, in part at least, to the fact that, at the beginning, we all take ‘a lower place’ than we do afterwards? Was not it that then you were least in your own eyes, that your feelings were more child-like, that you walked closer, that you had more abasing views of the wickedness of your own heart than now? And, if it be so—if we may take these words as applicable to a spiritual, as well as to a temporal prosperity, ‘When Ephraim spake trembling, he exalted himself in Israel’—then, is not the secret of a return to more religious enjoyment, and higher religious attainment, clearly defined and pointed out distinctly, ‘Go, and take the place where once you used to sit.’

IV. When you were nothing, but God was everything, God took a most stooping course with you.—He condescended to become a suitor; and, as if He had been the sinner, He said, ‘Come, and let us reason together.’ Do you want to reclaim any one? Do you want to lead any one? Do the same. Do not say, ‘You are a sinner’; but say, ‘I am a dreadful one.’ Do not say, ‘God will punish you’; but say, ‘God has had mercy even on me’! Do not place yourself at all above, but, whatever you are, go below that man. Be learners together, be penitents together, be seekers together, be saved together, be happy together. It is in ‘the lowest room’ that all the usefulness that ever was done in this world was done.

—Rev. James Vaughan.

Illustration

‘We have been taught to regard this parable as a counsel of prudence, and of a somewhat worldly prudence, rather than as a counsel of perfection. Some of our best commentators so read it, while they confess that, thus read, it enforces an artificial rather than a real humility, that it even makes an affected humility the cloak of a selfish ambition which is only too real and perilous. What [this interpretation] really comes to is this, that when our Lord was speaking to men who eagerly grasped at the best places, all He had to give them was some ironic advice on the best way of securing that paltry end, in the hope that if they learned not to snatch at what they desired, they might by and by come to desire something higher and better. Is that like Him? Do you recognise His manner, His spirit, in it? Can you possibly be content with such an interpretation of His words as this?’

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Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Luke 14:10". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/luke-14.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

10 But when thou art bidden, go and sit down in the lowest room; that when he that bade thee cometh, he may say unto thee, Friend, go up higher: then shalt thou have worship in the presence of them that sit at meat with thee.

Ver. 10. Then shalt thou have worship] Honor est in honorante, therefore to be the less esteemed, because without us, and mostly but a puff of stinking breath, not once to be valued.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:10". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-14.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Luke 14:10

I. To take the "lowest room" towards God is: (1) To be content simply to take God at His word, without asking any questions or raising any doubts, but to accept at His hand all that God graciously vouchsafes to give you—the pardon and the peace; to be a receptacle of love, a vessel into which, of His free mercy, He has poured and is pouring now, and will go on to pour for ever, the abundance of His grace. (2) Next, it is to be just what God makes you—to rest where He places you—to do what He tells you—only because He is everything and you nothing—conscious of a weakness which can only stand by leaning, and an ignorance which needs constant teaching—to be always emptying, because God is always filling.

II. How are we to take the lowest room towards man? It is quite useless to attempt to be humble with a fellow-creature, unless you are really humble with God. Do not put yourself up into the chair of judgment upon any man; but rather see yourself as you are; everybody is inferior in something—far worse than that man in some things. So your words will not grow censorious; and if you sit low enough, you will be sure to speak charitably. Sympathy is power, but there is no sympathy where there is self. Self must be destroyed to make sympathy. Do not mistake patronising for love. When you comfort sorrow, look well to it that you touch another's grief with a reverential hand. And sin—whatever you do, never treat sin with roughness or contempt. The Pure and Holy One never did that. He dealt with the worst sinner delicately. If you ask, "How am I to go lower?" among the thousand rules I select one—exalt Christ. If Christ do but occupy His right place in your heart, you will be sure in the presence of that majesty and of that beauty to go and sit down in the lowest room.

J. Vaughan, Sermons, 1867, p. 37.


References: Luke 14:10.—T. Birkett Dover, A Lent Manual, p. 11; Preacher's Monthly, vol. ii., p. 251; G. Matheson, Moments on the Mount, p. 270; G. H. Wilkinson, Church of England Pulpit, vol. iv., p. 310.

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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Luke 14:10". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/luke-14.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Luke 14:10. Go, and sit down in the lowest room; It is most probable that Christ himself, as illustrious a person as he was, had done thus, and sat down among them in the lowest place at the table.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Luke 14:10". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/luke-14.html. 1801-1803.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

10.] ἵνα, not expressing the view with which thou art to do it (Meyer, bezeichnet die Abficht des ἀνάπεσε), but a consequence which may follow: the view with which the act, as an objective fact, happens: the effect, of which it is (however the actor may be unaware of this) the cause; as the μήποτε in Luke 14:8.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 14:10". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-14.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 14:10. πορευθεὶς, having gone [Go and]) i.e. in taking the lowest place, do so with alacrity and from the heart [this is the force of πορευθεὶς].—[ τὸν ἔσχατον, the lowest) He who sets himself before even one, may possibly be forced to give place to that one. Therefore it is good to take the lowest place of all. No wrong that you can do to yourself, can inflict less of real loss upon you than this, if indeed it should happen that without thinking of it you should thereby do to yourself a wrong.—V. g.]— προσαναβῆθι) go up higher to others, who are [like thyself] ‘honourable’ guests. Proverbs 25:7, LXX., κρεῖσσον γάρ σοι τὸ ῥηθῆναι ἀναβῆναι, ταπεινῶσαί σε ἐν προσώπῳ δυνάστου.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 14:10". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-14.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Poole on "Luke 14:9"

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 14:10". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-14.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Have worship; receive honor.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 14:10". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-14.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

“But when you are invited, go and sit down in the lowest place, so that when he who has invited you comes, he may say to you, “Friend, go up higher.” Then you will have glory in the presence of all who sit at meat with you.”

What they should rather do is come early and take the lowest seat in the first place. Then the host will see them there, and recognising their deserved status will come and say, “Friend, go up higher.” Then all who are at the meal will recognise their promotion and they will be appreciated by all.

This is not intended to be a subtle strategy explaining how they could gain glory for themselves. A person who thought like that would deservedly find himself left in the lowest place. It is rather a warning against pride and arrogance and practical advice on how to avoid being humiliated. It is advice on the importance of allowing others to decide their status and give the recognition of what they deserved, rather than their deciding on it for themselves. John and James would have saved themselves similar humiliation if they had remembered this when they sought to oust Peter and the others (Mark 10:35-45). The other disciples meanwhile, equally desirous of the highest place, were angry about it. So Jesus had to rebuke all of them, and teach them the lesson that it is by humble service and having the heart of a true servant that such a place would be obtained. It is the one who serves, not seeking status, who will be given the highest place. Thus the one who will achieve it will be the one who least expects it. Indeed the highest place will be in the servant’s quarters where Jesus is.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 14:10". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-14.html. 2013.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

10.Friend, go up higher—Jesus here gives a lesson of human propriety, the observance of which improves both the public manners and morals. The writer of the book of Proverbs had given the same lesson in words which our Lord evidently intends substantially to quote, Proverbs 25:6-7.

“Put not forth thyself in the presence of the king; and stand not in the place of great men. For better it is that it be said unto thee, Come up hither,” etc.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 14:10". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-14.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 14:10. The opposite course and its results are described.

That. Our Lord does not bid them take a low place, for the purpose of being put higher. That would be false humility. This result is the purpose of God, who commands this conduct.

Have honor, lit., ‘glory,’ in contrast with ‘shame’ (Luke 14:9). ‘Worship’ was intended to convey the same idea.—There is nothing to warrant the idea that our Lord and His disciples were themselves in the lower places, and ought to have been invited to come up higher. Such hints about promotion at a Pharisee’s feast would not come from our Lord.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 14:10". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-14.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 14:10. : “go up higher,” A.V[117] and R.V[118]; better “come up higher,” which gives effect to the . The master invites the host to come towards himself. So Field (Ot. Nor.).

[117] Authorised Version.

[118] Revised Version.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 14:10". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-14.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Friend. Greek. philos, Noun of phileo. App-135.

go up = go up, forward.

Occurs only here.

worship = honour. Greek. doxa = glory.

at meat = at table.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 14:10". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-14.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

But when thou art bidden, go and sit down in the lowest room; that when he that bade thee cometh, he may say unto thee, Friend, go up higher: then shalt thou have worship in the presence of them that sit at meat with thee.

But when thou art bidden, go and sit down in the lowest room; that when he that bade thee cometh, he may say unto thee, Friend - said to the modest guest only, says the same critic, not the proud one (Luke 14:9).

Then shall thou have worship, [ doxa (Greek #1391)] - or 'honour.' The whole of this is but a reproduction of Proverbs 25:6-7. But it was reserved for the matchless Teacher to utter articulately, and apply to the regulation of the minutest features of social life, such great laws of the Kingdom of God as the following:

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 14:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-14.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(10) Sit down in the lowest room.—Better, as before, recline for the verb, and place, or couch, for the noun.

Friend.—The Greek word is not the same as in Matthew 20:13 (where see Note), Matthew 22:12; Matthew 26:50, but is the same as in John 11:11; John 15:14. The difference is suggestive. The first word addressed to the humble and lowly guest speaks of confidence and affection. He is welcomed as, in the highest sense, the “friend” of the giver of the feast.

Worship . . .—Better, honour, or glory, the same word as in John 5:44; John 12:43.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 14:10". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-14.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

But when thou art bidden, go and sit down in the lowest room; that when he that bade thee cometh, he may say unto thee, Friend, go up higher: then shalt thou have worship in the presence of them that sit at meat with thee.
go
1 Samuel 15:17; Proverbs 15:33; 25:6,7
then
Isaiah 60:14; Revelation 3:9
Reciprocal: 1 Samuel 9:22 - in the chiefest;  Matthew 20:12 - equal;  Mark 9:35 - If;  Romans 12:10 - in honour;  Galatians 5:26 - desirous

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 14:10". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-14.html.