Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 14:15

When one of those who were reclining at the table with Him heard this, he said to Him, "Blessed is everyone who will eat bread in the kingdom of God!"
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Jesus, the Christ;   Jesus Continued;   Thompson Chain Reference - Parables;   Truth;   The Topic Concordance - Blessings;   Kingdom of God;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Blessed, the;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Food;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Dead Sea Scrolls;   Hospitality;   Kingdom of God;   Lord's Supper, the;   Wealth;   Work;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Hospitality;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Banquets;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Blessing and Cursing;   Bread;   Family;   Luke, Gospel of;   Poor, Orphan, Widow;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Kingdom of God;   Lord's Prayer;   Matthew, Gospel According to;   Parable;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Beatitude;   Blessedness;   Blessedness (2);   Circumstantiality in the Parables;   Discourse;   Doctrines;   Excuse;   Father's House ;   Happiness;   Invitation;   Lazarus;   Luke, Gospel According to;   Marriage;   Meals;   Retribution (2);   Sacraments;   Sermon on the Mount;   Unity (2);   Worldliness (2);   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Prophet, the;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Banquet;   Jesus Christ (Part 2 of 2);   Maimed;   Meals;   Mercy;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

That shall eat bread in the kingdom of God - This is spoken in conformity to the general expectation of the Jews, who imagined that the kingdom of the Messiah should be wholly of a secular nature. Instead of αρτον, bread, EKMS-V, more than one hundred others, with some versions and fathers, read αριϚον, a dinner. This is probably the best reading, as it is likely it was a dinner at which they now sat; and it would be natural for the person to say, Happy is he who shall dine in the kingdom of God. It does not appear that there was any but this person present, who was capable of relishing the conversation of our Lord, or entering at all into its spiritual reference.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 14:15". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-14.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Blessed is he that shall eat bread in the kingdom of God - The kingdom of God here means the kingdom which the Messiah was to set up. See the notes at Matthew 3:2. The Jews supposed that he would be a temporal prince, and that his reign would be one of great magnificence and splendor. They supposed that the “Jews” then would be delivered from all their oppressions, and that, from being a degraded people, they would become the most distinguished and happy nation of the earth. To that period they looked forward as one of great happiness. There is some reason to think that they supposed that the ancient just people would then be raised up to enjoy the blessings of the reign of the Messiah. Our Saviour having mentioned the “resurrection of the just,” this man understood it in the common way of the Jews, and spoke of the special happiness which they expected at that time. The Jews “only,” he expected, would partake of those blessings. Those notions the Saviour corrects in the parable which follows.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 14:15". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-14.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Luke 14:15

Blessed is he that shall eat bread in the kingdom of God.

Unreal winds

There are a great many ways of turning a conversation when it happens to be suggestive of disagreeable truth, or to convey advice which we should prefer not to take, or to reveal to us points in our character which we should wish to keep hidden, even from ourselves. But of all the various devices resorted to for this purpose the pious ejaculation is usually the most successful, as well as by far the easiest. If it fail to change the subject, it at least causes an awkward pause, after which there is a fair prospect of an altered tone in the general talk.

I. GLANCE AT THE SCENE. The Saviour had been putting some pointed questions respecting personal religion to His host and fellow-guests. Feeling that things had gone far enough in their present direction, and yet that by no possibility could exception be taken to anything that had been said, the guest introduced to our notice in the text attempts to dismiss to heaven those heavenly things which are not easily acclimatised to earth; to project into the future those “very excellent things” which were felt to look best at a distance; to refer the whole subject to another world, and to change the venue, as I believe lawyers would say, by a formal remark--indisputable but unpractical--“Blessed is he that shall eat bread in the kingdom of God.”

II. Let us see HOW THIS SPEECH WAS MET. All unreal ejaculations are evasive, self-deceiving (like Balaam’s), or procrastinating; or all three. The ejaculation of the text was most likely all three. It was certainly evasive. And the Saviour met it by pointing out that the blessedness which the speaker, and others like him, professed to desire, was precisely that from which they were most ready to excuse themselves the moment it was offered to them; that “the kingdom of God” was something present, and not something merely future; that they could enjoy what they professed to regard as its blessings now; but that there were many other things which for the time being they very decidedly preferred.

III. NOW WHY DID HE WHO WOULD NOT “BREAK THE BRUISED REED OR QUENCH THE SMOKING FLAX” THUS DISCOURAGE THOSE WHO WERE SAYING WHAT WAS VERY GOOD? I should say, He did not discourage otherwise than by suggesting that they should weigh the import of their words and test their” reality. “By thy words,” said our Saviour, “thou shalt be justifed, and by thy words thou shalt be condemned. He did not mean, of course, that we shall be judged by these alone; but that they will be taken into account. And for a moment, drawing away our thoughts from our bad words, let us ask ourselves whether our good words may not prove, after all, the more condemning, and waft over ages and ages, as the verdict of the Most High, the echo of His words by Isaiah long ago, “This people honoureth Me with their lips, but their heart is far from Me.” (J. C.Coghlan, D. D.)

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Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Luke 14:15". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/luke-14.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And when one of them that sat at meat with him heard these things, he said unto him, Blessed is he that shall eat bread in the kingdom of God.

THE PARABLE OF THE SLIGHTED INVITATION

Trench explained what was probably in the mind of that guest who thus spoke in Jesus' presence:

When we keep in mind what were the Jewish hopes concerning the setting up of the kingdom of God (that it would be ushered in by a glorious festival), it is easy to perceive how this man's mind passed on to the great festival which (in their view) was to accompany the resurrection.[25]

Such a carnal view of God's kingdom was wrong, of course; but there was an even greater wrong in the assumption of the guest that himself and all the other Jews would enjoy such a messianic banquet to the exclusion of all others, especially Gentiles. In the following parable, Jesus moved to correct such false views and to warn that his hearers were in danger of missing the kingdom of God altogether.

ENDNOTE:

[25] Richard C. Trench, Notes on the Parables of Our Lord (Old Tappan, New Jersey: Fleming H. Revell Company, 1953), p. 362.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 14:15". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-14.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And when one of them that sat at meat with him,.... One of the Scribes, lawyers, or Pharisees, that were guests at this feast:

heard these things: which were spoken by Christ, and was pleased and affected with them, though he was ignorant:

he said unto him, blessed is he that shall eat bread in the kingdom of God; in the world to come, in the kingdom of the Messiah; concerning feasting in which, the Jews had entertained very gross notions; and which this man was reminded of by Christ's making mention of the resurrection of the just, and of recompense at that time, which the Jews expected at the Messiah's coming. They suppose, that God will make a splendid feast, a sumptuous entertainment; in which, besides "bread", which they call, לחמה של מלכות, "the bread of the kingdom", and "the bread of the world to come"F13Midrash Ruth, fol. 33. 2. Bereshit Rabba, sect. 82. fol. 72. 4. , there will be great variety of flesh, fish, and fowl, plenty of generous wine, and all sorts of delicious fruit: particularly they speak of a large ox, which they suppose to be the Behemoth in Job, that will then be prepared; and of Leviathan and his mate, which will then be dressed; and of a large fowl, called Ziz, of a monstrous size; and of old wine kept in the grape from the creation of the world, which will then be drank; and of the rich fruits of the garden of Eden, that will then be served upF14See my Notes on the Targum in Cant. viii. 2. : such gross and carnal notions have they entertained of the world to come; and which this man seemed to have imbibed, and placed happiness in.

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Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:15". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-14.html. 1999.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Blessed (μακαριοςmakarios). Happy, same word in the Beatitudes of Jesus (Matthew 5:3). This pious platitude whether due to ignorance or hypocrisy was called forth by Christ‘s words about the resurrection. It was a common figure among the rabbis, the use of a banquet for the bliss of heaven. This man may mean that this is a prerogative of the Pharisees. He assumed complacently that he will be among the number of the blest. Jesus himself uses this same figure of the spiritual banquet for heavenly bliss (Luke 22:29).

Shall eat (παγεταιphagetai). Future middle from εστιωesthiō defective verb, from stem of the aorist (επαγονephagon) like εδομαιedomai of the old Greek.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 14:15". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-14.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Blessed

See on Matthew 5:3.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 14:15". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-14.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Scofield's Reference Notes

kingdom

See note, (See Scofield "Matthew 6:33").

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Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Luke 14:15". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/luke-14.html. 1917.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

EATING BREAD IN THE KINGDOM

‘Blessed is he that shall eat bread in the Kingdom of God.’

Luke 14:15

That was the chance remark of a bystander who had heard our Lord speaking of the reward that belongs to the resurrection of the just.

The resurrection of the just! The glory that belongs to the risen life, worth possessing, worth struggling after! Yes, blessed is he that shall taste of that heavenly bread, that shall enjoy that holy fellowship! It is all that we mean by heaven, all that we dare to look forward to when the pilgrimage is over, something far exceeding hope or thought. Yes, fortunate is the man that reaches that place of heavenly bliss!

It is in reply to that natural exclamation that our Lord tells the story—the parable of the Great Supper. The story might be called ‘The acceptance and rejection of an invitation,’ and in it we notice three facts of importance—

(1) The joy and happiness that belong to the heavenly state.

(2) Why so many are indifferent to it.

(3) Why others accept it.

Rev. Canon Walpole.

Illustration

‘The future belongs to the strenuous, the wrestlers, the watchers, not to the idlers, and those who take no trouble. But though so many are too tired and distracted with the interests of their business or pleasures to give any heed to the invitation to that best of blessings, the Great Supper, there are others who make every effort to get there; the maimed and lame, who can only walk with difficulty; the blind, who require to be led; the poor, who have nothing but shabby clothes to go in—these all clamour to be taken in. It is far more difficult for them in some ways to get there, but their great needs have made them sure that God meant to satisfy them. They have had too little of the prosaic realities of life to be killed by them. Their sufferings have only sharpened their imagination. “Blessed are the poor in spirit: for theirs is the Kingdom of God.”’

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Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Luke 14:15". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/luke-14.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

15 And when one of them that sat at meat with him heard these things, he said unto him, Blessed is he that shall eat bread in the kingdom of God.

Ver. 15. Blessed is he, &c.] This man seems to have "tasted of the good word of God, and of the powers of the world to come," Hebrews 6:5. Happy he, if he fed heartily thereon. This, saith Luther, is sancta crapula.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:15". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-14.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Luke 14:15. Blessed is he that shall eat bread, &c.— The phrase to eat bread, signifies making a meal, and this not only at a common table, but sometimes at a feast. See 2 Samuel 9:7; 2 Samuel 9:10; 2 Samuel 12:17; 2 Samuel 12:20. Proverbs 9:5. The Jews were accustomed to think of the felicity of good men in the life to come under the notion of a sumptuous entertainment; and therefore our Lord frequently accommodates himself to their habit of thinking. See Matthew 8:11. Wherefore,when Jesus mentioned the resurrection of the just, one of the guests, ravished with the delightful prospect, cried out, "Blessed is he, who,being admitted into heaven,shall enjoy the conversation of the inhabitants of that glorious place; for these spiritual repasts must regale and invigorate his mind beyond expression!" Perhaps in this exclamation, the Pharisee meant both to congratulate the felicity of his countrymen, who looked upon themselves as the children or the kingdom; and to condole the lot of the heathen, who, as he imagined, were all to be excluded from heaven. Considered in this light, the subsequent parable appears with the greatest propriety and beauty, as the best reply to such an error, and the fittest method to correct and explode it.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Luke 14:15". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/luke-14.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

One of them that sat at meat with our Saviour in the Pharisee's house, hearing Christ speak of being recompensed at the resurrection of the just, repeated that known saying among the Rabbins, Blessed is he that shall eat bread in the kingdom of God: that is, who shall be partakers of the joys of heaven. Here upon Christ utters the parable of the marriage supper, recorded here by St. Luke, with small variation from that which was delivered by St. Matthew, Matthew 22:1-14

The first intention of our Saviour in that parable seems to be this, to set forth that gracious offer of mercy and salvation which was made by the preaching of the gospel unto the Jews, and to declare God's purpose of receiving the Gentiles into the fold of Christ, upon the Jews despising and rejecting that inestimable favor. But besides this, it has an aspect upon us Christans, who have embraced the doctrine of the gospel.

Here note, 1. That the gospel for its freeness and fullness, for its varieties and delicacies, is like a marriage supper:

1. It does create the same religion between Christ and believers, that marriage does between husband and wife.

2. It entitles to the same privileges that a conjugal relation does; to the same endearing love and tenderness, to the same care, protection, to the same honor, to the same happiness.

3. It obliges to the like duties, namely, unspotted love and fidelity, cheerful obedience to his commands, reverence to his person, submission to his authority.

4. It produces the same effects; as the effect of marriage is increase of children, so the fruit of the gospel is bringing many sons to God.

Note, 2. That gospel invitations are mightily disesteemed; they made light of the invitation, and offered frivolous excuses for their refusal of it.

Note, 3. That the preference which the world has in men's esteem, is a great cause of the gospel contempt; one had purchased a piece of ground, another had bought five yoke of oxen.

Note, 4. The deplorable sadness of their condition who refuse, upon any pretence whatever, to comply with the gospel tender of reconciliation and mercy: The king was wroth, pronounced them unworthy of his favor, and resolved they should not taste of his supper; but sends forth his servants to invite others to his supper.

Note, 5. The notion under which the Gentiles are set forth unto us, such as were in lanes, streets, and highways; that is, a rude, rustic, and barbarous people; whom the Jews despised, yea, whom they held accursed; yet even these are called accepted, while the Jews, the first intended guests, are excluded by means of their own contempt.

Note, lastly, the means used to bring in the Gentiles to the gospel supper: Go and compel them to come in; not by violence, but persuasion; by argumentation, not compulsion: the plain and persuasive, the powerful and efficacious preaching of the word, with the motions and influences of the Holy Spirit, are the compulsions here intended: not external force, not temporal punishment, nor outward violence. "No man ought by force and violence to be compelled to the profession of the true faith," says Tertullian.

Observe here, how vainly these words are brought to prove, that men may be compelled by the secular arm to embrace the Christian faith.

This appears,

1. From the nature of a banquet, to which none are compelled by force, but by persuasion only.

2. From the scope of the parable, which respects the calling of the Gentiles, who believed by the great power of God.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Luke 14:15". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/luke-14.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

15.] φάγεται is a well-known future, contracted from φαγήσεται: see reff.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 14:15". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-14.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 14:15. To the idea of the ἀνάστασις τῶν δικαίων is very naturally linked in the case of this fellow-guest the thought of the future eating ( φάγεται, future) with the patriarchs of the nation (Matthew 8:11; Luke 13:28 f.; Bertholdt, Christol. § 39) in the (millennial) Messianic kingdom about to be set up. This transporting prospect, in which his mistaken security is manifested, compels his exclamation.

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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Luke 14:15". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/luke-14.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 14:15. ἀκούσας, having heard) and having been touched thereby. [However one feels inclined to suspect, that something of a worldly character crept into His thoughts concerning the kingdom of GOD.—V. g.]— μακάριος, blessed) Alluding to the μακάριος, blessed, in Luke 14:14. Often this epithet includes in its signification the idea of something that is rare and uncommon. Comp. Luke 14:24. It is not enough to pronounce godly men ‘blessed;’ but each must exert himself for his part to the best of his ability. Comp. the following verses: also ch. Luke 13:23-24.— φάγεται) shall eat.— ἄρτον) Many read ἄριστον; but the reading ἄρτον is better established, especially as there is joined to it the verb φάγεται, which is more appropriate to ἄρτον, than ἄριστον: comp. Luke 14:1 [ φαγεῖν ἄρτον].(146) However at that time it seems to have been the ἄριστον, prandium, breakfast or luncheon, the early meal: see note on Luke 14:12. On that account it is worthy of the greater attention that in the parable set before them in Luke 14:16, it is a δεῖπνον, cæna, supper (our late dinner), which is specified.(147)

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 14:15". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-14.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Whether this person had any gross conceptions of the kingdom of God, as a state of external happiness, and sensible satisfactions, I cannot say (though it be the opinion of some valuable interpreters): he might mean no more than, Blessed is he that shall come to heaven, and enjoy the celestial pleasures and satisfactions there; for that blessed state is called the marriage supper of the Lamb; and Christ spake to his disciples in this dialect, when he spake of drinking wine with them in his kingdom. But this passage both lets us know the good influence of spiritual discourse, to set the tongues of others on work, and also it lets us see what good meditations may be founded almost upon any subjects, if we have any heart thereunto. This gives our Saviour an occasion to put forth the following parable.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 14:15". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-14.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

кто вкусит хлеба в Царствии Божием! Вероятно, этот человек придерживался общепринятого мнения, что только иудеи будут приглашены на небесный пир (см. пояснение к Мф. 8:12). Возможно, это было праздным или лицемерным высказыванием, сделанным без особого серьезного размышления. Христос ответил притчей, которая изображает включение в число приглашенных и язычников.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 14:15". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-14.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Eat bread in the kingdom of God; enjoy its blessings. See Matthew 3:2.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 14:15". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-14.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘And when one of those who sat at meat with him heard these things, he said to him, “Blessed is he who will eat bread within the Kingly Rule of God.” ’

Someone present overheard what Jesus had said and piously and complacently declared, “Blessed is he who will eat bread within the Kingly Rule of God.” All present there hoped to do so and would have re-echoed his sentiment. All who heard it would nod agreement. They thought that even if no one else was there, they would be. But Jesus, Who was very much aware that not all of them would be there, issued a warning in the form of a parable.

The language that the man uses, which echoes the terms used by Jesus, suggests that the man had been listening to some of Jesus preaching, and was aligning himself at least with that aspect of it, while of course interpreting it in terms of Pharisaic thinking. He wanted the prophet to realise that there were at least some who sympathised with Him. To ‘eat bread’ was shorthand for enjoying a good meal.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 14:15". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-14.html. 2013.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

15.One of them—Hearing that at the resurrection of the just the feast of the bountiful host will be repaid, one of the guests present, expecting that he would enjoy that higher feast also, utters an ejaculation upon the blessedness of such a lot.

Eat bread—The figure under which the Jew expressed the bliss of the Messiah’s glorious kingdom.

Kingdom of GodBy this the Jew meant a resurrection kingdom, when Messiah should come. Our Lord shows the ejaculator, that the feast of the true Messiah is the very feast which he and his fellow-guests are rejecting.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 14:15". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-14.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The fellow guest who voiced this comment appears to have understood that Jesus had been talking about the kingdom and not just about social propriety. Alternatively his or her comment may have been simply a pious reference to the kingdom, but this seems unlikely. The speaker seems to have assumed that he or she would be one of the blessed referred to. The speaker may have intended to correct Jesus" implication that some of those present might not participate ( Luke 14:13-14; cf. Luke 13:28-29). Jesus used the comment as an opportunity to clarify who would participate. A similar though obviously different parable occurs in Matthew 22:1-14.

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Luke 14:15". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/luke-14.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 14:15. One of them, etc. The company this ‘one’ was in and the parable which his remark called forth, oppose the view that he sympathized with our Lord. Some think it was merely an attempt at a diversion; since our Lord’s remarks were unpleasantly telling. It is more probable that the man, hearing of the resurrection of the just, at once thought of the great feast (the millennial feast) which the Jews expected would follow, and thus spoke with the common Jewish idea that his admission to that feast was a certainty.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 14:15". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-14.html. 1879-90.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Luke 14:15. When one of them that sat at meat heard these things, being touched therewith, he said, Blessed is he that shall eat bread in the kingdom of God — Blessed is the man who shall live in the time of the Messiah, and share the entertainments he will prepare for his people, when these virtues of humility, condescension, and charity shall flourish in all their glory. To eat bread, is a well-known Hebrew phrase for sharing in a repast, whether it be at a common meal or at a sumptuous feast. The word bread is not understood as suggesting either the scantiness or the meanness of the fare. “The kingdom of God, here, does not signify the kingdom of heaven in the highest sense, but only the kingdom of the Messiah, of which the carnal Jew here speaks, according to the received sense of his nation, as of a glorious temporal kingdom, in which the Jews should lord it over the Gentile world, enjoy their wealth and be provided with all temporal blessings and delights, in which they placed their happiness.” — Whitby. Thus also Dr. Campbell, who assigns the following reasons for understanding the expression in the same light: “1st, This way of speaking of the happiness of the Messiah’s administration suits entirely the hopes and wishes which seem to have been long entertained by the nation concerning it. 2d, The parable which, in answer to the remark, was spoken by our Lord, is on all hands understood to represent the Christian dispensation. 3d, The obvious intention of that parable is, to suggest the prejudices which, from notions of secular felicity and grandeur, the nation in general entertained on that subject; in consequence of which prejudices, what in prospect they fancied so blessed a period, would, when present, be exceedingly neglected and despised; and, in this view, nothing could be more apposite, whereas there appears no appositeness in the parable on the other interpretation;” that is, on understanding the kingdom of God, in the preceding remark, as signifying the kingdom of future glory.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Luke 14:15". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/luke-14.html. 1857.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

in. Greek. en. App-104.

the kingdom of God. See App-114.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 14:15". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-14.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And when one of them that sat at meat with him heard these things, he said unto him, Blessed is he that shall eat bread in the kingdom of God.

And when one of them that sat at meat with him heard these things, he said unto him, Blessed is he that shall eat bread in the kingdom of God. Since our Lord's words seemed to hold forth the future "recompense" under the idea of a great Feast, the thought passes through this man's mind, how blessed they would be who should be honoured to sit down to it. A pious exclamation it seemed to be; but, from our Lord's reply, it would appear to have sounded in His ears more like Balaam's wish, "Let me die the death of the righteous, and let my last end be like his" (Numbers 23:10) - a wish only to be safe and happy at last, while rejecting all present invitations to turn to God and live. 'The Great Feast of which you sigh to partake,' says our Lord, 'is prepared already: the invitations are issued, but declined: the Feast, notwithstanding, shall have guests enough, and the table shall be filled: but when its present contemners come to sue for admission to it-as they will yet do-not one of them shall taste of it.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 14:15". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-14.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(15) Blessed is he that shall eat bread . . .—The form of the exclamation was obviously determined by the words which our Lord had just spoken. It may have been a more or less familiar formula among devout Jews who expected the coming of the Christ. It may have embodied some recollections of the great discourse at Capernaum (John 6:26-59). On the whole it seems more natural to see in it a burst of honest, unwonted enthusiasm, kindled by sympathy with what our Lord had said, than to regard it as spoken hypocritically, with a view to drawing from His lips some heretical utterance that might ensure His condemnation.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 14:15". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-14.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And when one of them that sat at meat with him heard these things, he said unto him, Blessed is he that shall eat bread in the kingdom of God.
Blessed
12:37; 13:29; 22:30; Matthew 8:11; 25:10; John 6:27-59; Revelation 19:9
Reciprocal: Exodus 18:12 - eat bread;  2 Samuel 9:10 - shall eat bread;  Matthew 22:3 - sent;  Luke 6:20 - for;  Luke 13:28 - the kingdom;  Luke 22:16 - until;  Romans 14:17 - kingdom;  Revelation 20:6 - Blessed

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 14:15". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-14.html.