Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 14:16

But He said to him, "A man was giving a big dinner, and he invited many;
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Covetousness;   Feasts;   Gospel;   Jesus, the Christ;   Jesus Continued;   Kingdom of Heaven;   Opportunity;   Reproof;   Salvation;   Unbelief;   Thompson Chain Reference - Absorption;   Bible Stories for Children;   Business;   Business Life;   Children;   Feasts;   Food, Physical-Spiritual;   Food, Spiritual;   Home;   Pleasant Sunday Afternoons;   Religion;   Spiritual;   Stories for Children;   The Topic Concordance - Kingdom of God;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Entertainments;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Feasts;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Food;   Grace;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Christ, Christology;   Dead Sea Scrolls;   Gospel;   Grace;   Hospitality;   Kingdom of God;   Lord's Supper, the;   Wealth;   Work;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Hospitality;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Parable;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Call, Calling;   Family;   Luke, Gospel of;   Poor, Orphan, Widow;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Kingdom of God;   Matthew, Gospel According to;   Parable;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Business (2);   Call, Calling;   Circumstantiality in the Parables;   Courtesy;   Discourse;   Dropsy;   Excuse;   Invitation;   Israel, Israelite;   Kindness (2);   Lazarus;   Luke, Gospel According to;   Marriage;   Meals;   Old Testament (Ii. Christ as Student and Interpreter of).;   Sacraments;   Supper ;   Unity (2);   Wealth (2);   Wedding Garment;   Worldliness (2);   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Prophet, the;   Supper;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chief parables and miracles in the bible;   Meals;   Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Supper;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Banquet;   Jesus Christ (Part 2 of 2);   Maimed;   Meals;   Mercy;   Providence;  

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

A great supper - Or great feast. It is said to be “great” on account of the number who were invited.

Bade many - Invited many beforehand. There is little difficulty in understanding this parable. The man who made the supper is, without doubt, designed to represent God; the supper, the provisions which he has made for the salvation of people; and the invitation, the offers which he made to people, particularly to the Jews, of salvation. See a similar parable explained in the notes at Matthew 22:1-14.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 14:16". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-14.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

But he said unto him, A certain man made a great supper, and he bade many.

<MONO>

The man = God

The great supper = God's kingdom

Many = the IsraelitesSIZE>MONO>

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 14:16". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-14.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Then said he unto him,.... That is, Jesus, as the Syriac, Persic, and Ethiopic versions express it; he said to the man that was so affected with the happiness of such that shall share in the provisions of the Messiah's kingdom;

a certain man made a great supper: by which is meant not the Lord's supper, which was not as yet instituted; nor the supper of the Lamb, which will be at the end of the world; but the Gospel dispensation, which was now taking place, and the provisions of it in the word and ordinances: and which is called a "supper"; because made in the end of the world, in the last days: and a "great" one, because of the maker of it, the King of kings, and Lord of lords; and the matter of it, a variety of rich provisions, a feast of fat things, an entertainment consisting of the greatest dainties, and most delightful food; and on account of the number of the guests invited, all people, every creature, to whom the outward ministration of the Gospel comes; and those who are properly guests that come, are a great number which no man can number; as well as because of the cost and charges of it to the maker, though it is all free to the guests; and likewise because of the circumstances of exceeding great joy and pleasure that attend it; to which may be added, the long duration of it, even from the first to the second coming of Christ.

And bade many. This first bidding more especially respects the Jews, who are said to be "many", in reference to the promise made to Abraham, that his seed should be as the stars of the heavens, and as the sand of the sea; and to set off the magnificence of the feast; and in distinction from all the world, and every creature, which were afterwards put into the Gospel commission: a foundation was laid for this supper in eternity, in the purposes, counsel, and covenant of God; and many prophecies concerning it were given out from the beginning; and sacrifices and ordinances were instituted, as emblematical of it, and to lead on to it, and give notice of it.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:16". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-14.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

a great supper — (Compare Isaiah 25:6).

bade manyhistorically, the Jews (see on Matthew 22:3); generally, those within the pale of professed discipleship.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 14:16". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-14.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Made (εποιειepoiei). Imperfect active, was on the point of making (inchoative).

Great supper (δειπνονdeipnon). Or dinner, a formal feast. Jesus takes up the conventional remark of the guest and by this parable shows that such an attitude was no guarantee of godliness (Bruce). This parable of the marriage of the King‘s son (Luke 14:15-24) has many points of likeness to the parable of the wedding garment (Matthew 22:1-14) and as many differences also. The occasions are very different, that in Matthew grows out of the attempt to arrest Jesus while this one is due to the pious comment of a guest at the feast and the wording is also quite different. Hence we conclude that they are distinct parables.

And he bade many (και εκαλεσεν πολλουςkai ekalesen pollous). Aorist active, a distinct and definite act following the imperfect εποιειepoiei f0).

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 14:16". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-14.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Made ( ἐποίει )

Imperfect, was making. His preparations were in progress. A definite act among these preparations is described by the aorist, he bade ( ἐκάλεσεν ), the technical word for inviting to a festival. See Matthew 22:3; John 2:2.

Sent his servant

“If a sheikh, bey, or emeer invites, he always sends a servant to call you at the proper time. This servant often repeats the very formula mentioned in Luke 14:17: Come, for the supper is ready. The fact that this custom is confined to the wealthy and to the nobility is in strict agreement with the parable, where the man who made the supper is supposed to be of this class. It is true now, as then, that to refuse is a high insult to the maker of the feast (Thomson, “Land and Book”)Palgrave mentions a similar formula of invitation among the Bedouins of Arabia. “The chief, or some un-breeched youngster of his family, comes up to us with the customary tefaddalooor do us the favor (“Central and Eastern Arabia”).

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 14:16". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-14.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Then said he unto him, A certain man made a great supper, and bade many:

Then said he — Continuing the allusion.

A certain man made a great supper — As if he had said, All men are not sensible of this happiness. Many might have a part in it, and will not.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:16". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-14.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

And when one of them that sat at meat with him heard these things, he said unto him, Blessed is he that shall eat bread in the kingdom of God1.

  1. Blessed is he that shall eat bread in the kingdom of God. The language of Christ implied that God himself would feast those who feasted the poor, and this implication accorded with the Jewish notion that the kingdom of God would be ushered in with a great festival. Inspired by this thought, and feeling confident that he should have been part of the festivities, this guest exclaimed upon the anticipated blessedness.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
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J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 14:16". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-14.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

A great supper. This supper represents the kingdom of God, to which the guest had alluded, in the Luke 14:15; so that the parable is a rejoinder to his remark; and is intended to show that the Jews, who were first invited, would reject the blessedness, which this guest had spoken of, and that then the invitation would be extended to other nations.--Bade; invited.

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Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Luke 14:16". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/luke-14.html. 1878.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

THE GREAT SUPPER

‘A certain man made a great supper, and bade many.’

Luke 14:16

It is very instructive to mark the conduct of our Blessed Lord in His intercourse with worldly people. Wherever He went, He sought to do good by word as well as action.

Here we find Him at a feast (Luke 14:15), but mark how He improves the occasion (Deuteronomy 6:6-7; Ephesians 4:29; Malachi 3:16). As they sit around the festive board, He tells them of—

I. Another great feast that was made (Luke 14:16).—The feast of good things in the Gospel. We meet with this picture often in Scripture (Proverbs 9:1-5; Song of Solomon 5:1; Isaiah 25:6). So it was familiar to the hearers. What three things go to make up a feast? Nice company (Revelation 19:9; Revelation 21:27); good cheer (Isaiah 55:1-2; Revelation 7:16-17); great joy (Revelation 19:7; Revelation 21:4). What a picture of the Gospel!

II. The invitation that was given, or rather the call made (Luke 14:17).—The guests had been invited, ‘were bidden.’ A messenger now tells them it is time to come in. We have been invited, the Spirit now says, ‘Come’ (Revelation 22:17). Notice the words of invitation—‘Come.’ Just as you are—whoever you are (Luke 15:2). ‘All things’ (Ephesians 1:3) ‘are now ready.’ Father is ready (Luke 15:20-22); Son ready (John 6:35); Spirit ready (Micah 2:7). Are we ready? ‘Now’—there can be no delay (2 Corinthians 6:2; Psalms 27:8; Psalms 119:60).

III. The excuses that were offered (Luke 14:18-20).—You see they all began to make excuse (Isaiah 28:12; Jeremiah 6:10; Jeremiah 6:16); but if we examine them, each is a lie. Would a man buy a piece of ground without seeing it? Would a man buy oxen without proving them! Would not a man be glad to take his wife with him? These are the excuses of earth, but what shall he say in the presence of God (Matthew 22:12)?

IV. The solemn consequences (Luke 14:21; Luke 14:24).—Those who excused themselves from accepting the call were deprived of all the privileges (Acts 13:46; John 5:40). By the Jews rejecting the grace of God, salvation is come to the Gentiles (Romans 11). It is a fearful thing to refuse God’s Word (John 6:66) or to delay its reception (Acts 24:25).

Let us take encouragement from the Word. ‘Yet there is room’ (Luke 14:22; Psalms 130:7); room for me, room for my family, room for all I can bring—but room for no excuse.

—Bishop Rowley Hill.

Illustration

‘Unhappily, there was a large proportion of those amongst whom our Lord moved who had nothing to say to the message one way or the other. It never stirred within them one genuine feeling of repentance, never excited a single hope. They were quiet, respectable folk, mostly belonging to the commercial and comfortable classes, but too much engrossed in commerce or home to have any real sense of the next world. The next world, when they had so much to occupy them about this! The world of imagination and fancy, instead of the world of fact! The world of God, instead of the world of man! No; they were too matter-of-fact, too practical—had too much common sense to be thinking about imaginary suppers when the actual work of the world had to be done! They had nothing against it; it was all very beautiful and attractive and interesting, and doubtless very true, but then, it was not business. They liked the Preacher—He was so good, spoke in such a wonderful way, was so earnest—but the message, well, it was all very well for Him, Who had no calling in life, no family to maintain, but for themselves, frankly impossible.’

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Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Luke 14:16". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/luke-14.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

16 Then said he unto him, A certain man made a great supper, and bade many:

Ver. 16. Made a great supper] δειπνον, παρα το δειν πονειν. They are happy that get to heaven; they rest from their labours. The ancients dined frugally, supped liberally. Be of good cheer, said that martyr to her husband that suffered with her; for though we have but an ill dinner, we shall sup with Christ.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:16". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-14.html. 1865-1868.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

16.] The δεῖπ. μέγα is the βασιλεία τ. θεοῦ, the feast of fat things in Isaiah 25:6; completed in the marriage-supper of the Lamb; but fully prepared when the glad tidings of the gospel were proclaimed.

ἐκάλ. πολ.] These first κεκλημένοι are the Pharisees and Scribes and learned among the Jews.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 14:16". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-14.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 14:16. ΄έγα, great) Both a sumptuous supper and one capable of satisfying abundantly many. What is meant is the kingdom of grace, in so far as through it the entrance is to be to the kingdom of glory.— ἐκάλεσε, bade, invited) This word forms the bond of connection between the two discourses on the subject of banqueting or entertainments, such as are calculated to lead to blessedness, Call (invite) the poor to thee: Obey the call (invitation) of God.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 14:16". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-14.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Ver. 16-24. We met with the same parable Matthew 22:1-10, where we had the most of what is here, and really other considerable circumstances: See Poole on "Matthew 22:1" and following verses to Matthew 2:10. Christ’s primary intention by this parable was certainly to foretell the rejection of the Jews for their contempt of his gospel, and the reception of the Gentiles. They were those who were first bidden, that is, called and invited by the preaching of John the Baptist, Christ himself, and the apostles, to the receiving of Christ, that so they might be prepared for the marriage supper of the Lamb, mentioned Revelation 19:9. The Gentiles, as a more rustic people, are set out under the notion of such as were in lanes, streets, and highways. It also informs us of some great causes of men’s rejection of the grace of God offered them in the ministry of the gospel:

1. Their worldly cares and businesses.

2. Their sensible enjoyments and pleasures:

which did not hinder the Jews only, but one or other of which hinders the most of people still from receiving the grace of Christ tendered in the gospel. They are either not at leisure to attend to their souls, or they must enjoy things sensible and sensual in a degree in which the enjoyment of them is inconsistent with that duty which God requireth of them who would be saved. Perimus licitis, most men perish by their sinful use (or abuse rather) of things in themselves lawful. It may be observed also, that the two first sorts made a kind of mannerly excuse, saying,

I pray thee have me excused; but the last peremptorily said,

I cannot come. Though secular employments be great diversions of us, and so hinderances of our minding things of highest concernment, yet sensual satisfactions and pleasures do most drown and swallow up the soul of man, and keep it from minding heaven and heavenly things. There have been a great many words spent about those words,

compel them to come in, Luke 14:23. It appeareth to be almost the unanimous sense of the ancients, That no man ought by temporal punishments to be compelled to the profession of the true faith. Some of them have a little differed about such as, having once embraced the doctrine of the true faith, afterwards swerved from it; though the truth of it is, they can be no more compelled than the other, for the will admits of no violence. Be the truth what it will in those points, certain it is that external compulsion hath no colour of foundation in this text. They are the ministers of the gospel that are thus spoken to, who we know by Christ’s commission had no civil power committed to them. Nor do we ever read that they exercised any in order to the bringing of the Gentiles to the embracing of the faith; nor do servants sent out to invite men to feasts (as these were) use to pull them in by head and shoulders, or to drive them in by whips and cudgels, only to use the best arguments they can to persuade them. Christ never prescribed any Spanish conversions of people. Man is presumed to be a rational creature, and taught even by nature to choose things which he sees are or may be of highest importance and concern. So that the very opening to men the riches of Divine grace, fitted to their lost and undone state, (which must also be showed them), is a compulsion of them, or would at least be so if men by the fall were not corrupted as to their wills, so as they will not follow the dictate of their understanding. But notwithstanding the depravation and averseness of the carnal will, yet as many as the Lord will please to show mercy to, by joining the efficacious operations of his Spirit with the exterior call in the ministry of the word, shall come in. The words are anagkson eiselyein, make it necessary for them to come in, which no cudgels, no bodily punishments, can do, for they have their choice whether they will die or do it. It is used Matthew 14:22; Christ compelled his disciples to go into a ship, hnagkasen, yet it is certain he used no swords, or staves, or whips, or pecuniary mulcts to enforce them. A word of as high an import is used Luke 24:29, of the two disciples compelling Christ to stay with them, parebiasanto. So Galatians 2:14, anagkazeiv, why dost thou force the Gentiles to Judaize? Yet it is certain Peter neither exercised nor called in the power of the magistrate to force the Gentiles. But when men began to spare their pains as to their tongues, to overpower and prevail upon men’s hearts, then they began to compel them, by civil coercions, and to call in the civil magistrate, to the effecting of what they would have, while they themselves would do nothing; and thus, contrary to all sense and reason, they expounded these words,

compel them to come in.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 14:16". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-14.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

большой ужин Эта притча, во многих отношениях подобная притче в Мф. 22:2-14 и подчеркивающая ту же мысль, тем не менее от нее отличается. Она была сказана по другому поводу и отличается некоторыми основными деталями.

звал многих По-видимому, от приглашения никто не отказался и у того человека были все основания ожидать, что все приглашенные придут.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 14:16". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-14.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

A great supper; representing the rich and abundant provisions of the gospel.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 14:16". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-14.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

16.Unto him—Our Lord’s first parable was to the guests; his second to the host; his third to this ejaculator.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 14:16". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-14.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 14:16. A certain man. Here representing God, since the parable conveys a lesson about eating bread ‘in the kingdom of God’ (Luke 14:15).

A great supper. The figure suggested by the last remark is taken up. God prepares ‘a feast of fat things’ (Isaiah 25:6), which is to culminate in the marriage supper of the Lamb. The immediate reference is to gospel privileges. While the Lord’s Supper is not directly alluded to, it may well be regarded as the sign and seal of the privileges here represented, and as the pledge of the more glorious feast in the future.

And bade many. The ‘many’ represent the Jewish nation, but especially the Pharisees and the rulers (see Luke 14:21). The first invitation was given through the ancient prophets, the feast being still in the future.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 14:16". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-14.html. 1879-90.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

By this man we are to understand Christ Jesus, the great mediator between God and man. He sent his servants, at supper-time, to say to them that were invited, that they should come; i.e. he sent his apostles to call the people of Israel, who had been invited to his supper on almost innumerable occasions: but they not only refused the invitation, but also murdered the Lord who had invited them. We may remark, that the three different excuses exactly agree with what St. John says: All that is in the world is the concupiscence of the flesh, and concupiscence of the eyes, and the pride of life. The one says, I have married a wife, by which may be understood the concupiscence of the flesh; another says, I have bought five yoke of oxen, by which is denoted the concupiscence of the eyes; and the pride of life is signified by the purchase of the farm, which the third alleges in his justification. (St. Augustine, de verb. Dei.)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Luke 14:16". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/luke-14.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

made. T Tr. A Val and R read "was making". This parable is in Luke only. For the interpretation, see App-140.:17 sent. According to custom.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 14:16". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-14.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Then said he unto him, A certain man made a great supper, and bade many:

Then said he unto him, A certain man made a great supper. The blessings of Salvation are in Scripture familiarly set forth as a Feast, to signify not merely the rich abundance and variety of them, but their suitableness to our spiritual wants, and the high satisfaction and enjoyment which they yield. Thus, Isaiah 25:6, "And in this mountain (mount Zion, Hebrews 12:22) shall the Lord of hosts make unto all peoples [ w

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 14:16". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-14.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(16) A certain man made a great supper.—Historically this has the interest of being the first occurrence of the “feast” imagery in our Lord’s teaching. Here, as with so many of His parables, it is suggested by the occasion. Afterwards, as in Matthew 22:1-13, it is reproduced in an altered and expanded form. Here, as there, the giver of the feast is God.

And bade many.—The sequel determines the primary application of the word to the Jewish people. But it need hardly be said that it admits of manifold secondary, or even tertiary, applications through the whole history of the many churches of Christendom.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 14:16". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-14.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Then said he unto him, A certain man made a great supper, and bade many:
A certain
Proverbs 9:1,2; Isaiah 25:6,7; Jeremiah 31:12-14; Zechariah 10:7; Matthew 22:2-14
bade
Song of Solomon 5:1; Isaiah 55:1-7; Mark 16:15,16; Revelation 3:20; 22:17
Reciprocal: Zephaniah 1:7 - he hath;  Matthew 13:22 - the care;  Matthew 22:1 - GeneralActs 13:46 - seeing;  Revelation 19:9 - Blessed

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 14:16". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-14.html.