Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Numbers 25:10

Then the Lord spoke to Moses, saying,
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Decision;   Fear of God;   Israel;   Phinehas;   Zeal, Religious;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Atonement, under the Law;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Idol, Idolatry;   Midianites;   Moabites;   Phinehas;   Simeon;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Balaam;   Midian;   Phinehas;   Priest;   Zadok;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Covenant;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Zimri;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Census;   Pentateuch;   Zimri;   Holman Bible Dictionary - High Priest;   Midian, Midianites;   Numbers, Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Malachi;   Moses;   Numbers, Book of;   Phinehas;   Zimri;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Midian, Midianites ;   Phinehas ;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Balaam;   Phinehas;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Baal;   Phinehas;   Shittim;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Ba'al,;   Phin'ehas;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Peculiarities of the Law of Moses;   On to Canaan;   Moses, the Man of God;   Conquest of Canaan;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Cozbi;   Midianitish Woman;   Moses;   Phinehas;   Zimri (1);   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Alexander Jannæ;   Balaam;   Bemidbar Rabbah;   ;   Phinehas;   Priest;   Sidra;   Zimri;  

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

"And Jehovah spake unto Moses, saying, Phinehas, the son of Eleazar, the son of Aaron the priest, hath turned my wrath away from the children of Israel, in that he was jealous with my jealousy among them, so that I consumed not the children of Israel in my jealousy. Wherefore say, Behold, I give unto him my covenant of peace: and it shall be unto him, and to his seed after him, the covenant of an everlasting priesthood; because he was jealous for his God, and made atonement for the children of Israel."

Many scholars have expressed a surprise approaching consternation that Almighty God would so reward a ruthless murderer, but they have merely misread the reason for God's reward of Phinehas. His zeal is what God commended and what he rewarded. We have exactly the counterpart of this in the N.T. in Jesus' parable of the Unjust Steward upon whom the Lord poured out the very highest of praises, not for his dishonesty, of course, but for the intelligence and zeal with which he handled his earthly affairs. We have the same kind of situation here. Somebody had to do something. Most of the incompetent judges had proved their inability to do anything, and as the heir apparent to the high priesthood, Phinehas took it upon himself to act in defense of the Word of God. The critical superstition to the effect that this was invented in later generations to defend the claim of the descendants of Phinehas to the office of High Priest is unprovable, without foundation, and required by no intelligent reason whatever. As a matter of fact, beginning with Ely, the descendants of Eleazar were high priests until the times of Solomon who took the office away from Eleazar's descendants in the person of Abiathar and gave it to Zadock of the line of Phinehas where it continued throughout the history of Israel.

Copyright Statement
Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Numbers 25:10". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/numbers-25.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And the Lord spake unto Moses,.... Out of the cloud, or out of the tabernacle, at the door of which Moses now was, Numbers 25:6, this was after so many had died of the plague, and after the fact of Phinehas, by which it was stopped: saying; as follows.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Numbers 25:10". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/numbers-25.html. 1999.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

spake. See note on Numbers 1:1.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Numbers 25:10". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/numbers-25.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And the LORD spake unto Moses, saying,

No JFB commentary on this verse.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Numbers 25:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/numbers-25.html. 1871-8.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

10.And the Lord spake unto Moses. In these words God makes it appear that He was the author of the death (of Zimri and Cozbi;) (186) not only because He was thus propitiated towards the people, but because He calls the zeal of Phinehas His own. (187) It will, however, accord equally well whether we take it actively or passively, viz., either that Phinehas was inflamed with zeal to vindicate God’s glory, or that he took upon him the zeal of God Himself. Whichever be preferred, God refers to Himself what was done by Phinehas. When He declares that He was appeased by the punishment inflicted, let us not imagine that there was a meritorious satisfaction, whereby the Papists feign that their punishments are redeemed before God. For although the just chastisements of sin are sacrifices of sweet savor, they are by no means expiations to reconcile God. Besides, there is no question here of compensation, but what is meant is, that it was a means of appeasing God, when the ungodliness of the people which had, as it were, fanned up His wrath into a flame, was repressed by this severe correction. Thus, in Psalms 106:0, the atonement is ascribed not to the act of Phinehas, but only to his prayer, (188) because, in right of his priesthood, he had humbly interceded for the people. At the same time, the statement of Paul is true, that those are not judged by God who voluntarily judge themselves, (1 Corinthians 11:31,) since, by their penitence, they in a manner prevent this judgment.

A perpetual priesthood is promised to Phinehas as his reward. If any object, that he thus obtained nothing new, since, in accordance with the rule of the law, he was the undoubted successor of his father, I reply, that it is not un-common that what God had already freely promised, He declares that He will give by way of reward. Thus, what had been promised to Abraham before the birth of Isaac, is again repeated after he was prepared to sacrifice him, (Genesis 22:16 :) “Because thou hast done this thing, and hast not withheld thy son,” therefore, “in blessing I will bless thee, and in thy seed shall all the nations of the earth be blessed.” Besides, the privilege of a single individual is not simply in question here, but it refers to a perpetual succession, as if God had promised that his posterity should never fail. And assuredly, the change which took place at the commencement of Solomon’s reign, is not repugnant to this promise, for it may be probably inferred that Zadoc, no less than Abiathar, was of the race of Phinehas. This covenant is called a “covenant of peace,” because it was to be surely established; consequently, it may be properly rendered, “My covenant in peace.” At any rate, it indicates prosperity, as if He had said that Phinehas, together with his posterity, should prosperously execute the sacerdotal office.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Numbers 25:10". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/numbers-25.html. 1840-57.