Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Revelation 19:5

And a voice came from the throne, saying, "Give praise to our God, all you His bond-servants, you who fear Him, the small and the great."
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Fear of God;   Praise;   Vision;   Thompson Chain Reference - Gratitude-Ingratitude;   Heavenly;   Praise;   Worship;   The Topic Concordance - Fear;   Praise;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Apocalyptic literature;   Babylon;   Praise;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Alleluia;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Revelation, the Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Fear;   Hallelujah;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Antichrist;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Praise our God, etc. - Let all, whether redeemed from among Jews or Gentiles, give glory to God.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Revelation 19:5". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/revelation-19.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And a voice came out of the throne - A voice seemed to come from the very midst of the throne. It is not said by whom this voice was uttered. It cannot be supposed, however, that it was uttered by God himself, for the command which it gave was this: “Praise our God,” etc. For the same reason it seems hardly probable that it was the voice of the Messiah, unless it be supposed that he here identifies himself with the redeemed church, and speaks of God as his God and hers. It would seem rather that it was a responsive voice that came from those nearest the throne, calling on all to unite in praising God in view of what was done. The meaning then will be, that all heaven was interested in the triumph of the church, and that one portion of the dwellers there called on the others to unite in offering thanksgiving.

Praise our God - The God that we worship.

All ye his servants - All in heaven and earth; all have occasion for thankfulness.

And ye that fear him - That reverence and obey him. The fear of the Lord is a common expression in the Scriptures to denote true piety.

Both small and great - All of every class and condition - poor and rich - young and old; those of humble and those of exalted rank. Compare Psalm 148:7-13.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Revelation 19:5". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/revelation-19.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And a voice came out of the throne,.... Not from God the Father, that sat upon it, for the phrase,

praise our God, could not be said by him with propriety and pertinence; but rather from Christ, the Lamb, in the midst of the throne, who as Mediator could say of him to his people, my God and your God, and my Father and your Father, John 20:17 though it seems best to understand it of the voice of one of the angels about the throne, since one of these is afterwards spoken of, whom John would have worshipped, but was forbid, Revelation 19:9 and which may design either one of the ministering spirits, or a preacher of the Gospel, and a set of such, calling upon the saints to the discharge of their duty, or to return to it on this occasion:

saying, praise our God, all ye his servants; meaning not the ministers of the Gospel only, who serve in the Gospel of Christ, by preaching and defending it, and in the administration of Gospel ordinances to the comfort of the saints, but all the people of God; for though they are sons, and no more servants to sin and Satan, and the world, yet they are servants of God and of righteousness, and serve him willingly and cheerfully in a way of duty, and without slavish fear, and with a godly one, and from principles of love and gratitude, and without mercenary views and selfish ends; and these are called upon, as a part of their service, to say hallelujah, or to sing the praises of God for his judgments on antichrist; see Psalm 134:1.

and ye that fear him, both small and great; who fear the Lord, not with a servile, but filial fear, with the new covenant grace of fear, which springs from, and is increased by, the goodness and grace of God; whether greater or lesser believers, fathers, young men, or children; whether Jews or Gentiles, or of whatsoever nation, kindred, or people; see Psalm 115:13.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Gill, John. "Commentary on Revelation 19:5". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/revelation-19.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

4 And a voice came out of the 5 throne, saying, Praise our God, all ye his servants, and ye that fear him, both small and great.

(4) The second place of praise, as I said {See (Revelation 19:1) } which first is commanded by God in this verse: and then is in most ample manner pronounced by the creatures, both because they see that kingdom of Christ to come, which they desire, (Revelation 19:6) and also because they see the Church is called forth to be brought home to the house of her husband by holy marriage, to the fellowship of his kingdom, (Revelation 19:7-8). Therefore John is commanded to write in a book the acclamation together with a divine testimony, (Revelation 19:9). {(5)} Out of the temple from God as in (Revelation 11:19).
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Revelation 19:5". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/revelation-19.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

out ofGreek, “out from the throne” in A, B, C.

Praise our God — Compare the solemn act of praise performed by the Levites, 1 Chronicles 16:36; 1 Chronicles 23:5, especially when the house of God was filled with the divine glory (2 Chronicles 5:13).

both — omitted in A, B, C, Vulgate, Coptic, and Syriac. Translate as Greek,the small and the great.”

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 19:5". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/revelation-19.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

A voice from the throne (πωνη απο του τρονουphōnē apo tou thronou). Not the voice of God, nor of the Lamb, nor εκ του ναουek tou naou (Revelation 16:17), but from an angel of the Presence. This angel summons all the servants of God to join in the antiphonal praise to God.

Give praise to our God (αινειτε τωι τεωι ημωνaineite tōi theōi hēmōn). Present active imperative of αινεωaineō old verb, with the accusative elsewhere in N.T., but here with the dative as occasionally in the lxx (1 Chron 16:36, etc.).

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Revelation 19:5". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/revelation-19.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

All ye His servants - small and great

Compare Psalm 115:13; Psalm 134:1.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 19:5". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/revelation-19.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And a voice came out of the throne, saying, Praise our God, all ye his servants, and ye that fear him, both small and great.

And a voice came forth from the throne — Probably from the four living creatures, saying, Praise our God - The occasion and matter of this song of praise follow immediately after, verses6, Revelation 19:6 etc.; God was praised before, for his judgment of the great whore, verses1-4. Revelation 19:1-4Now for that which follows it: for that the Lord God, the Almighty, takes the kingdom to himself, and avenges himself on the rest of his enemies. Were all these inhabitants of heaven mistaken? If not, there is real, yea, and terrible anger in God.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Revelation 19:5". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/revelation-19.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

5 And a voice came out of the throne, saying, Praise our God, all ye his servants, and ye that fear him, both small and great.

Ver. 5. And a voice came out] This is the Lamb’s voice, his all quickening voice, which shall rouse and raise the dead and dedolent Jews; powerfully pulling the veil from their hard hearts, which yet were somewhat moved and mollified by the former Alleluiahs, so that now all the servants of God, small and great, Jew and Gentile, shall praise him with one consent.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Revelation 19:5". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/revelation-19.html. 1865-1868.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Revelation 19:5. ἀπὸ τοῦ θρόνου. “Out of the throne.” It does not follow that the voice is that of Christ who sits upon the throne.(4033) Beng. writes that it belongs to the four beasts; Züll. and De Wette, to one of them. It may be referred also to the elders, because of the form of the summons ( τ. θ. ἡ΄ῶν).(4034)

τῷ θεῷ. The dat. with αἰνεῖν, which is regarded as though it were διδόναι αὶνον,(4035) occurs also in the LXX.(4036) Comparison with the Hebrew text shows not only that the expression αἰνεῖτε τῷ θεῷ says precisely the same as the ἁλληλουϊά retained in the Hebrew form,(4037) but also that the construction of αἰνεῖν with the dat. has occurred where the הַלֵּל was combined with כְ. In Jeremiah 20:13, a clause so construed at any rate precedes.

πἀντες οἱ δοῦλοι αὐτοῦ. Cf. Psalms 135:1.

οἱ φοβούμενοι, κ. τ. λ. Cf. Psalms 115:13.

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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Revelation 19:5". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/revelation-19.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Revelation 19:5. (208) αἰνεῖτε τῷ θεῷ ἡ΄ῶν) The LXX., καὶ ᾔνεσαν τῷ κυρίῳ, 1 Chronicles 16:36; αἰνεῖν τῷ κυρίῳ, ch. 1 Chronicles 23:5; also 2 Chronicles 5:13; 2 Chronicles 20:19, Hebr. הלל ליהוה. That solemn act of praise which was accustomed to be offered to the Lord by the Levites is described in these places. Add the passage of Ezra 3:11, respecting all the people, in the same phrase in Hebrew and Greek. How much greater solemnity is there in the Apocalypse! All His servants, and they that fear Him, small and great, are stirred up to a solemn proclaiming of His praise. They perform this in Revelation 19:6. [Comp. Psalms 115:13.]

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Revelation 19:5". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/revelation-19.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

And a voice came out of the throne, from Christ, declaring it the will of God, that all holy ones should praise him upon this account.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Revelation 19:5". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/revelation-19.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

малые и великие Здесь не должно быть ни различий, ни рангов.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Revelation 19:5". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/revelation-19.html.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And a voice came forth from the throne, saying, Give praise to our God, all ye his servants, ye that fear him, the small and the great.

Give praise to our God, all ye his servants ... This is the message intended by the praise in heaven. The persecuted saints should praise God who still sits on the throne; and no enemy, either of good or of the redeemed, shall escape his judgment.

Small and great ... is an idiom for "all" of God's true servants.

The repeated Hallelujah's are the keynote of all Revelation:

Though the enemies of good rage against his people like savage beasts, and Baby]on exults in her insolence, "God remains supreme, keeping watch above his own," and ready to call his foes to account when their rebellion has passed the point of no return.[10]

Just as these first five verses look back to the judgment of the harlot, the next four look forward to the true Bride, the Lamb's wife, to be glorified in subsequent chapters. It is impossible not to see that in these obvious and dramatic contrasts between the harlot and the true wife of Christ, the true nature of the harlot as "apostate religion" is revealed.

ENDNOTE:

[10] F. F. Bruce, A New Testament Commentary (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Zondervan Publishing House, 1969), p. 660.

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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Revelation 19:5". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/revelation-19.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The authoritative voice from the throne probably belonged to an angel ( Revelation 19:10). It called for added continuous praise from all God"s servants (cf. Psalm 113:1; Psalm 115:13). Allusions to the Hallel psalms in this pericope connect the vindication that the psalmists cried out for so often with what was now imminent (cf. Psalm 113:1; Psalm 135:1; Psalm 135:20). The bond-servants to whom the voice appealed for praise probably include all the servants of God in heaven, angelic and human, including the saints and prophets (cf. Revelation 18:14; Revelation 18:20; Revelation 19:2). The angel called for the fear of God since judgment is in view. The call extends to creatures of all classes (cf. Psalm 115:13).

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 19:5". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/revelation-19.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Revelation 19:5. A voice is next heard from the throne calling upon all God’s people to give praise to Him. The voice is immediately answered.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Revelation 19:5". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/revelation-19.html. 1879-90.

Gary Hampton Commentary on Selected Books

The speaker is not identified, but his voice comes out of the throne and commands all God"s servants, which would include righteous men and angels, to praise God. Coffman says the words "small and great" are used to clearly set forth that it is a command for all of God"s servants.

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Hampton, Gary. "Commentary on Revelation 19:5". "Gary Hampton Commentary on Selected Books". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ghc/revelation-19.html. 2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

out of = from. Greek. ek, but the texts read apo. App-104.

servants. App-190. See Psalms 134:1.

and, both. Omit.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Revelation 19:5". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/revelation-19.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And a voice came out of the throne saying Praise our God all ye his servants and ye that fear him both And a voice came out of the throne, saying, Praise our God, all ye his servants, and ye that fear him, both small and great.

Out of, [ apo (Greek #575)] - 'out from the throne' in A B C.

Praise our God. Compare the solemn praise by the Levites (1 Chronicles 16:36; 1 Chronicles 23:5): the house of God was consequently filled with the divine glory (2 Chronicles 5:13).

Both - omitted in 'Aleph (') A B C, Vulgate, Coptic, Syriac: 'the small and the great.'

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 19:5". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/revelation-19.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And a voice came out of the throne, saying, Praise our God, all ye his servants, and ye that fear him, both small and great.
a voice
7:15; 11:19; 16:17
Praise
Psalms 103:20-22; 134:1; 135:1,19,20; 148:11-13; 150:6
both
11:18; 20:12
Reciprocal: Genesis 22:12 - now;  Deuteronomy 4:10 - fear me;  1 Kings 8:40 - fear thee;  2 Kings 4:1 - thy servant did fear;  1 Chronicles 12:40 - there was joy;  Psalm 30:4 - Sing;  Psalm 31:23 - saints;  Psalm 34:3 - let us;  Psalm 48:1 - greatly;  Psalm 63:5 - with joyful;  Psalm 66:8 - make;  Psalm 86:12 - praise;  Psalm 113:1 - O;  Psalm 115:11 - GeneralPsalm 115:13 - both small;  Psalm 118:4 - GeneralPsalm 145:10 - and thy saints;  Ecclesiastes 12:13 - Fear;  Isaiah 29:23 - fear the God;  Daniel 3:26 - ye servants;  Luke 1:50 - GeneralLuke 17:16 - fell;  Romans 3:18 - GeneralRevelation 13:16 - both;  Revelation 14:7 - Fear

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Revelation 19:5". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/revelation-19.html.

Walter Scott's Commentary on Revelation

THE THRONE SPEAKS.

Revelation 19:5. — "And a voice came out of the throne saying, Praise our God, all ye His bondmen, (and) ye that fear Him, small and great." In a former vision we had the cry of the altar (Revelation 16:7, R.V.); here the throne itself speaks. In some of the past scenes, where a body of witnessing and suffering saints were in view, the altar came into prominence, but here it is direct judgment upon evil on the earth, for God is upon His throne, as Christ is about to sit on His. The very throne is moved to speech (symbolic, of course); thus from the centre and source of government — the terror of the wicked, the joy of the saints — goes forth a call to "praise." All who serve and all who fear Him, small and great, are invited to join in the glad song, which is a relief after the dark picture unfolded on earth. Here the terms are sufficiently wide to embrace every soul in Heaven — angels, servants, and every redeemed one. Nor is it a call addressed to an unwilling congregation. All are ready, but a new cause of joy is to be furnished, a new ground of praise. THE MARRIAGE OF THE LAMB is about to be announced.

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Scott, Walter. "Commentary on Revelation 19:5". "Walter Scott's Commentary on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sor/revelation-19.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

The voice thus far in these verses seems to have come from the people in general who respect the Lord. Now the voice comes out of the throne as if to acknowledge the congratulations just offered to God, and endorsing the idea that all servants of whatever degree or rank should praise Him.

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Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on Revelation 19:5". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/revelation-19.html. 1952.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Revelation 19:5. And a voice went out of the throne and said, Praise our God, all his servants, and ye that fear him, small and great. According to ch. Revelation 16:17, the voice from the throne can only belong to him, who sits upon the throne. We cannot understand it of God the Father, as appears from the call, "Praise our God." So that the voice must be the voice of Christ, who, according to ch. Revelation 5:6, occupies the space between the throne with the beasts, and the elders; according to ch. Revelation 7:17, is in the midst of the throne; according to ch. Revelation 3:21, sits with his Father on his throne; whence the throne is to be regarded as that of God and of the Lamb, ch. Revelation 22:1; Revelation 22:3. We are also led to refer the voice to Christ by comparing ch. Revelation 14:1, where we find the company of the saints in an act of adoration gathered around their Saviour after the attainment of victory; and by ch. Revelation 15:3, where the Lamb sings with his people the song of redemption. It becomes the author of salvation to his people to call upon them to give thanks for it.

The voice cannot be attributed to the cherubim, not merely because they are not upon the throne, but because from their whole position they are not properly qualified for addressing such a call.

It is of especial importance to note, that the voice of Christ proceeded from the throne, as this betokened, that he is equal to God in power and glory. The preceding song celebrated a salvation, which, as exhibited in the vision, had already been accomplished. Here a still higher salvation must be celebrated, which is contemplated even in the vision as future, and only begins by and bye to unfold itself in the portions that follow. The security, that this anticipative song of praise belongs to another sphere than that of pleasant dreams, could only be afforded by the true and proper Godhead of Christ. As the God of Jesus Christ (comp. ch. Revelation 3:12) and of his saints (comp. the declaration in John 20:17, "I go to my Father and your Father, to my God and your God"), God manifests himself in the most glorious manner, by conducting the church through the severest conflicts to victory and final glorification.[Note: The correct reading is τῷ θεῷ ἡμῶν; comp. the הודּו לו in Psalms 100:4, and especially Psalms 116:1, where the Hallelujah is coupled with הודו ליהוה. The LXX. have often αἰ νεῖ ν with the dative; for ex. In 1 Chronicles 16:36; 1 Chronicles 23:5. The reading of τὸ ν θεὸ ν ἡ μῶ ν has arisen merely from an ignorance on the part of copyists regarding this Hebraism.] In regard to the words, "all his servants and ye who fear him, small and great," comp. on ch. Revelation 11:18.

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Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on Revelation 19:5". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/revelation-19.html.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

5.Voice came out of the throne—Commentators differ as to whose was this voice, the throne. Stuart thinks it was the Messiah; and for the words our God, as from him, Stuart quotes as precedents John 20:17; Hebrews 2:11, and Revelation 18:4. Against this view Alford protests. We venture to ask, Why was it not the voice of the throne itself? In Revelation 7:13, we have, “A voice from the four horns of the altar;” and in Revelation 16:7 there is a voice from the altar, which Alford rightly interprets as the altar itself becoming vocal. This would add plausibility to Wordsworth’s attributing the words in Revelation 11:1, to the “reed,” which the literal wording of the Greek requires.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Revelation 19:5". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/revelation-19.html. 1874-1909.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Revelation 19:5. The O.T. expression servants of God implied (R. S. 69 f.) not simply membership in a community of which God is king, but special devotion to his service and worship. It was not associated with any idea of “slavery to a divine despot,” but was originally confined in the main to royal and priestly families (cf.Revelation 1:5) which had a special interest in primitive religion and which were near to the god of the tribe or nation. Hence, in the broader and later sense of the term, the “servants of God” are all those who live in pious fear of him, i.e., yielding him honour and obedience. John, pre-occupied with judgment, views the faith of the Lord as equivalent practically to his fear; unlike most early Christian writers, who (1 Peter 1:17-18, etc.) carefully bring forward the complementary element of love. Lowly confidence rather than warm intimacy is this prophet’s ideal of the Christian life towards God. See Did. 3, 4.; Barn. Revelation 4:11; Herm. Mand. x. 1, xii. 4, 6.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Revelation 19:5". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/revelation-19.html. 1897-1910.

The Bible Study New Testament

5. The sound of a voice, saying. A solo voice, perhaps one of the angels. All – angel or man – are called upon to Praise our God!

 

 

 

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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Revelation 19:5". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/revelation-19.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.