Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Revelation 22:20

He who testifies to these things says, "Yes, I am coming quickly." Amen. Come, Lord Jesus.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Amen;   Jesus Continued;   Readings, Select;   Scofield Reference Index - Bible Prayers;   Thompson Chain Reference - Advent;   Amen;   Coming, Second Coming of Christ;   Future, the;   Heaven;   Heavenly;   Home;   Living Water;   Second Coming of Christ;   Water;   Water of Life;   Wells;   The Topic Concordance - Coming of the Lord Jesus Christ;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Second Coming of Christ, the;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Amen;   Jesus christ;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Amen;   Confidence;   Kingdom of God;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Amen;   Obedience;   CARM Theological Dictionary - Heaven;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Canticles;   ;   Revelation of John, the;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Hope;   Lord;   Revelation, the Book of;   Second Coming, the;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Maranatha;   Prayer;   Revelation, Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Amen;   Amen (2);   Anathema;   Eschatology;   Hymn;   Isaiah ;   Jesus ;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Amen;   Revelation, the;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Amen;   Maranatha;   Revelation of John:;   Sure;   Text and Manuscripts of the New Testament;  
Devotionals:
Chip Shots from the Ruff of Life - Devotion for August 9;   Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for September 6;   Every Day Light - Devotion for October 29;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Surely I come quickly - This may be truly said to every person in every age; Jesus the Judge is at the door!

Even so, come, Lord Jesus - The wish and desire of the suffering Church, and of all the followers of God, who are longing for the coming of his kingdom.

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Revelation 22:20". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/revelation-22.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

He which testifieth these things - The Lord Jesus; for he it was that had, through the instrumentality of the angel, borne this solemn witness to the truth of these things, and this book was to be regarded as his revelation to mankind. See the notes on Revelation 1:1; Revelation 22:16. He here speaks of himself, and vouches for the truth and reality of these things by saying that he “testifies” of them, or bears witness to them. Compare John 18:37. The fact that Jesus himself vouches for the truth of what is here revealed, shows the propriety of what John had said in the previous verses about adding to it, or taking from it.

Saith, Surely I come quickly - That is, the development of these events will soon begin - though their consummation may extend into far distant ages, or into eternity. See the notes on Revelation 1:1, Revelation 1:3; Revelation 22:7, Revelation 22:10.

Amen - A word of solemn affirmation or assent. See the notes on Matthew 6:13. Here it is to be regarded as the expression of John, signifying his solemn and cheerful assent to what the Saviour had said, that he would come quickly. It is the utterance of a strong desire that it might be so. He longed for his appearing.

Even so - These, too, are the words of John, and are a response to what the Saviour had just said. In the original, it is a response in the same language which the Saviour had used, and the beauty of the passage is marred by the translation “Even so.” The original is, “He which testifieth to these things saith, Yea - ναὶ nai- I come quickly. Amen. Yea - ναὶ nai- come, Lord Jesus.” It is the utterance of desire in the precise language which the Saviour had used - heart responding to heart.

Come, Lord Jesus - That is, as here intended, “Come in the manner and for the objects referred to in this book.” The language, however, is expressive of the feeling of piety in a more extended sense, and may be used to denote a desire that the Lord Jesus would come in any and every manner; that he would come to impart to us the tokens of his presence; that he would come to bless his truth and to revive his work in the churches; that he would come to convert sinners, and to build up his people in holiness; that he would come to sustain us in affliction, and to defend us in temptation; that he would come to put a period to idolatry, superstition, and error, and to extend the knowledge of his truth in the world; that he would come to set up his kingdom on the earth, and to rule in the hearts of people; that he would come to receive us to his presence, and to gather his redeemed people into his everlasting kingdom. It was appropriate to the aged John, suffering exile in a lonely island, to pray that the Lord Jesus would speedily come to take him to himself; and there could have been no more suitable close of this marvelous book than the utterance of such a desire. And it is appropriate for us as we finish its contemplation, disclosing so much of the glories of the heavenly world, and the blessedness of the redeemed in their final state, when we think of the earth, with its sorrows, trials, and cares, to respond to the prayer, and to say, “Come, Lord Jesus, come quickly.” For that glorious coming of the Son of God, when he shall gather his redeemed people to himself, may all who read these notes be finally prepared. Amen.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Revelation 22:20". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/revelation-22.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Revelation 22:20

He which testifieth these things, saith, surely I come quickly.

On the coming of Christ

I. Some of the great events which will most unquestionably take place at our Saviour’s second appearance.

1. He will come again with inexpressible dignity and grandeur.

2. The resurrection of the dead is another glorious result of our Saviour’s second appearance.

3. The dissolution of this globe will be the awful consequence, also, of our Saviour’s reappearance.

II. For what purpose these great events will take place on our Saviour’s reappearance.

1. Jesus will come again to vindicate the honour of the Divine administration, and to evince the admirable wisdom and justice with which it has been administered.

2. The eternal separation of the virtuous from the wicked.

3. The equitable and unerring distribution of eternal rewards and punishments which will then take place.

Lessons:

1. The consideration of our Saviour’s second coming to reward every one according to his works, should have a permanent influence on our present temper and conduct.

2. The appointment of our Saviour to be our Judge is a merciful condescension to the weakness and imperfection of our natures, which would be overwhelmed by the infinite splendour of that Almighty Being, in whose presence the angels cover their faces with their wings, which would be otherwise dazzled with such immensity of glory. (A. Stirling, LL. D.)

Even so come, Lord Jesus.

Man hailing the judgment

There are four states of mind amongst men in relation to the last day. Some are indifferent to it, as were the antediluvians in relation to the Deluge; some scornfully deny it, as did the infidels in the days of Peter; some are horror-stricken at it, as were the demoniacs in the time of Christ; and some welcome it, as John did now. Three things are implied in this last state of mind--

I. A conviction that such a day will dawn.

II. A conviction of preparedness to enter on the trial.

III. A conviction that the results of that day will be fraught with personal good. (Homilist.)

Yearning for Christ

A state of expectation tries faith and feeds it too. The veil which hides, suggests. A doubtful bestowment, to be able to raise it before the time! Hope nurses energy. Energy is trained in mingled knowledge and ignorance.

I. The effacing of our souls for the fulness of fellowship with Christ. The life we live is a longing. There is discord which only Jesus can resolve. There is possibility which in the light of His presence will see this out into fact. Gloom, in which we wait with our eyes towards the east, waiting for the sun-rising. We are children crying for the Comforter.

II. The purpose of our hearts to be prepared for the higher service. Come and give us our place in Thy kingdom. Come and take up the fruits of our life into Thy garner, and make them the seed-corn of the everlasting future. The response of the lips will be the key-note; the fullest most varied existence will never lose it; on that the music will rest and melt into the praise of Heaven. (R. Redford, LL. B.)

Sudden death

The primary reference in the words may be, and probably is, to His coming for the initiation of those august procedures in history which are prophetically recorded in the Book of Revelation; but also there may be an underlying reference in them to His appearing at death to the individual disciple. The death of the believer is always, in a true sense, the coming of Christ to him. Applying the words in this way, then, as having a possible personal relation to ourselves, the question naturally occurs: Can we take up and repeat this reply of the apostle, “Amen. Even so, come quickly, Lord Jesus?” John evidently spoke thus in all sincerity and solemn earnestness. But we may not feel, perhaps, that John was a type for us, since he surpassed us in so many things. He was “the beloved disciple.” He had been admitted to a peculiar personal intimacy with Christ. Especially, perhaps, we think he could say this when he may have been at this time--it is not certain--in the decline of life, or already advanced in years; when, at any rate, he was dwelling in a world unfriendly to him and to his faith, without companions, without a home, a lonely exile upon the rock of Patmos. It was then only natural and proper, we may think, that he should utter this prayer to Christ. But we may not so freely repeat it after him. There is a certain tremor of hesitation, natural to the heart, in echoing the words. We have no right to offer such a prayer. Even John did not offer it until the Master had manifested to him His purpose of coming quickly, and then he simply responded to the declared will of the Lord. We may do that, I think, with equal cheerfulness and gladness. When the Master forewarns us that His coming is to be sudden and speedy, we may take up without hesitation, if we are His followers, the words of the apostle: “Amen. Even so, come, Lord Jesus!” The example of John justifies us in this. He was an eminent disciple; he had had peculiar intimacy of relation with the Master. But he was still a man who needed forgiveness, even as you and I do. He was a man only sanctified in part, as you and I are. Yet he spoke these words, because he knew the Master fully. He had known Him on earth, and he had now seen Him in heaven. He knew the sovereignty of the Lord, but he knew as well His spirit of self-sacrifice; he knew how He had died on the Cross when He need not have done so unless He had chosen, for the salvation of sinners. Therefore, knowing His tenderness as well as His holiness, His infinite sympathy as well as His sovereign and unlimited power, he could say: “Even so, I am not timid before Thy coming; Thy word does-not smite me with fear. Come, Lord Jesus. If we are, then, in fellowship with John, through a similar faith in the Divine Master, we also may take up and echo his words. Consider also why Christ comes at death to His disciple; what things He comes to accomplish.

1. He comes for the recognition of character in His beloved. For this, in part, His approach and death are made.

2. He comes also for the consummation of character in the disciple; not only to recognise it, but to bring it to its completeness. Every Christian grace has its vital root in faith, that is, in loyal and undoubting confidence toward the Son of God. And precisely as this faith becomes clear and firm, in that proportion the graces which spring from it are multiplied and enriched, are raised to a sweeter and mightier supremacy. When, then, at last faith culminates in vision, and we see the Lord--not merely in the evangelical records, not merely in the worship of the Church, or its manifesting sacraments, but “face to face”--then every grace which has been within us, in element and germ, shall rise to sudden superlative completeness, and to the fulness of perfect exhibition.

3. He comes, too, for the coronation of character, as well as for its recognition and its supreme consummation. Character, rooted in faith towards Himself, is the one thing precious on earth to Christ. The production of it in the human soul was the very purpose of His coming in the incarnation. His whole life on earth bore evidently upon this result. Every miracle said, “Believe in Me.” Every gracious word of promise attracted to such belief in Him. And when this faith is ready to be transferred to the skies, Christ comes at death to consummate and to crown it. That is the fulfilment of His purpose in Redemption. He must crown the spirit which He seeks and loves. Therefore it was that John could say, “Amen. Even so, Lord, come quickly.” And so we need not, either of us, fear, if we are in the faith and fellowship of John, to take upon our lips the same sublime and solemn words.

4. I think that here is suggested a fair preliminary test of experience in us. Suppose that Christ were to come to us at this moment, that for us the earth swung suddenly away into darkness and silence, that unto us the heavens were opened” would He find in us that which He at this instant would accept and approve? Should we be able to welcome Him now at that swift coming?

5. If we can meet this test we need no more to be afraid of sudden death. Within ourselves is that which Christ Himself hath wrought, in which He has gladness. Then we shall share, when we die, in the glory of the transfigured Lord; not seeing it merely, as silently and suddenly it came to the Apostles, but ourselves being participants in it. And that will be all that death is to the disciple. (R. S. Storrs, D. D.)

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Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Revelation 22:20". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/revelation-22.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

He which testifieth these things,.... Not the angel, Revelation 22:16 nor John, who sometimes used this way of speaking, John 21:24 but Christ, as appears from what follows; for he

saith, surely I come quickly; who not only asserts the speediness of his coming, as in Revelation 22:7 but expresses the certainty of it, so that it ought not to be doubted of by any, especially by his own people; though it may seem to be deferred, and, upon that account, be derided by ungodly men; and Christ may have some respect, in this strong repetition of it, to the certainty of the punishment that will then be inflicted upon such who add to, or diminish from this book; for he himself will certainly come in person, and execute the vengeance threatened. John next puts his

Amen to it, signifying his assent unto it, declaring his faith in it, and expressing his earnest desire after it, and wish for it: and in words at length adds,

even so come, Lord Jesus; quickly, speedily as thou hast said, and in all thy glory; set up thy kingdom, let that come, introduce thy people into it, and destroy thine enemies; this he said as one that loved the appearance of Christ, longed for it, hastened to it, and was impatient at the delay of it.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Gill, John. "Commentary on Revelation 22:20". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/revelation-22.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

10 He which testifieth these things saith, Surely I come quickly. Amen. Even so, come, Lord Jesus.

(10) A divine confirmation or sealing of the supplication first from Christ affirming the same and denouncing his coming against all those that will put their sacrilegious hands here: then from John himself, who by a most holy prayer calls Christ to take vengeance on them.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Revelation 22:20". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/revelation-22.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Amen. Even so, come — The Song of Solomon (Song of Solomon 8:14) closes with the same yearning prayer for Christ‘s coming. A, B, and Aleph omit “Even so,” Greek, “{(nai}”: then translate for Amen,So be it, come, Lord Jesus”; joining the “Amen,” or “So be it,” not with Christ‘s saying (for He calls Himself the “Amen” at the beginning of sentences, rather than puts it as a con)firmation at the end), but with John‘s reply. Christ‘s “I come,” and John‘s “Come,” are almost coincident in time; so truly does the believer reflect the mind of his Lord.

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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 22:20". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/revelation-22.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

He which testifieth (ο μαρτυρωνho marturōn). That is Jesus (Revelation 1:2) who has just spoken (Revelation 22:18).

Yea: I come quickly (Ναι ερχομαι ταχυNaiΝαιerchomai tachu). Affirmation again of the promise in Revelation 22:7, Revelation 22:12. On Αμην ερχου Κυριε ΙησουNai (Yes) see Revelation 1:7 for the Lord‘s assent to the call. Then John expresses his absolute belief in the Lord‘s promise: “Amen: come, Lord Jesus” (ΑμηνAmēnερχουerchouΚυριεKurie Iēsou). On ΙησουAmēn see Revelation 1:7. On Μαρανα ταerchou see Revelation 22:17. Note Kurie with Iēsou As in 1 Corinthians 12:3; Philippians 2:11. For Paul‘s confidence in the deity of Christ and the certainty of his second coming see Titus 2:13; 2 Timothy 4:8. Marana tha (1 Corinthians 16:22).

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Revelation 22:20". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/revelation-22.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Even so ( ναὶ )

Omit.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 22:20". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/revelation-22.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

He which testifieth these things saith, Surely I come quickly. Amen. Even so, come, Lord Jesus.

He that testifieth these things — Even all that is contained in this book.

Saith — For the encouragement of the church in all her afflictions.

Yea — Answering the call of the Spirit and the bride.

I come quickly — To destroy all her enemies, and establish her in a state of perfect and everlasting happiness. The apostle expresses his earnest desire and hope of this, by answering, Amen. Come, Lord Jesus!

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Revelation 22:20". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/revelation-22.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

20 He which testifieth these things saith, Surely I come quickly. Amen. Even so, come, Lord Jesus.

Ver. 20. Even so; Come, Lord Jesus] This is the common and constant vote of all good people; and is therefore pinned as a badge upon their sleeve, 1 Thessalonians 1:10. {See Trapp on "1 Thessalonians 1:10"}

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Revelation 22:20". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/revelation-22.html. 1865-1868.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

That is, Jesus Christ, the faithful and true Witness, from whom St. John received this revelation, as he formerly had done the holy gospel, saith, Surely I come quickly.

Where note, 1. That this prophecy or promise of Christ's second coming to judge the world, is here left as Christ's second coming to judge the world, is here left as Christ's last word upon record; it is almost the last word in the Bible, doubtless, that it might be seriously minded and frequently remembered by us. Christ had in this chapter twice before, namely, at Revelation 22:7; Revelation 22:12, testified that he came quickly; yet he repeats it here again, to excite us to prepare for it, and to live continually in the expectation of it.

Note, That as Christ has several times in this chapter given us the assurance of the certainty of his coming, so he prefixes an, Ecce, or Behold, before it, Behold! I come quickly; and here he prefixes the word surely before it, Surely, I come quickly, to awaken the security, and leave the incredulity of sinners without excuse, who live as if they did not believe any such day would come.

To the fore-mentioned assurance of the certainty of our Saviour's coming, St. John, in the name of the whole church, subjoins a hearty Amen, an earnest wish, a passionate desire and longing for our Lord's coming, saying, Even so, come, Lord Jesus, as thou has promised, and thy people long expected.

Learn hence, 1. That the coming of Christ to judgment is a truth firmly believed, and earnestly desired by all good christians.

St. John here, in the name of the church, takes, as it were, the word out of Christ's mouth like a quick echo, and presently improves the promise into a prayer. Christ's farewell word to his church is, I come quickly; the church's farewell wuit to Christ is, Come, Lord Jesus, come quickly.

Quest. But why is Christ's second coming so exceedingly desired by his church and children?

Ans. For finishing the days of sinning, and destroying the works of Satan; for accomplishing the number of his own elect, and for hastening his kingdom; for freeing the creature from subjection to vanity; for manifesting the glory of his justice and mercy, and for putting his saints into the full and final possession of their promised inheritance.

Learn, 2. That it is the unfeigned desire of God's faithful servants, to have the full fruition of Jesus Christ; this is the habitual desire of their hearts, that Christ would come, and receive them to himself, though at the same time they may tremble at some circumstances of his coming: there is a degree of sinful bondage, which hinders much our spiritual confidence nad boldness; but the more holy we are, the more emboldened we shall be against the day of judgment.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Revelation 22:20". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/revelation-22.html. 1700-1703.

Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae

DISCOURSE: 2536

THE COMING OF CHRIST DESIRED

Revelation 22:20. He which testifieth these things saith, Surely I come quickly; Amen. Even so, come, Lord Jesus.

IN the Book of Revelation is contained a series of prophecies, from the apostolic age to the end of the world. To them must nothing be added: from them must nothing be withdrawn. To alter any thing contained in them is at the peril of our souls. In perfect agreement with them will every event be found at the last: the Church will triumph; her enemies will be put to shame; and the Lord Jesus Christ, into whose hands all things are committed, will be glorified in all. Speedily, too, will this desirable result appear: for “He who testifieth of these things,” even the Lord Jesus Christ, the Judge of quick and dead, says, “Surely I come quickly.” And his beloved Apostle, to whom he had revealed these things, welcomed the glorious consummation, saying, “Amen. Even so, come, Lord Jesus.”

Now, in these words we see Christ’s coming to judgment,

I. As a period to be expected—

Of this period the whole Scriptures testify—

[In the Old Testament indeed, little, in comparison, is spoken of it: yet we can have no doubt but that it was known, not only to the descendants of Abraham, but even before the flood: for St. Jude tells us, that Enoch, the seventh from Adam, prophesied respecting it, saying, “Behold, the Lord cometh, with ten thousand of his saints, to execute judgment upon all [Note: Jude, ver. 14, 15.].” In the New Testament it forms a very prominent part of the inspired records; continual reference being made to that period, and the circumstances that shall then take place being fully developed. The person of the Judge, the manner of his advent, the establishment of his tribunal, the solemnities of his judgment, the final sentence which he will pronounce, and the eternal states of men fixed in perfect accordance with it, are all described, with a minuteness which places every thing, as it were, before our eyes, and enables us to anticipate with certainty the whole process [Note: Matthew 25:31-34.] — — —]

And it is now fast approaching—

[Time, in our eyes, appears long: but “with God, one day is as a thousand years, and a thousand years as one day.” Our blessed Lord, when on earth, spake of it as near at hand. St. Paul adverted to it in such strong terms, that he was misunderstood by many, whose misconceptions he afterwards removed by a more plain and full declaration respecting it. Since the period that this revelation was given to John, above seventeen hundred years have elapsed: so that, if at that time it could be said by our Lord, “Surely I come quickly,” much more must it be true at this day. Even in reference to the general judgment, it is true; because the time that shall intervene before it, is no more, in comparison of eternity, than the twinkling of an eye. But, in reference to individuals, it is true, even in the most obvious and literal sense: for our time is only like a shadow that departeth, and hasteth away like the eagle in its flight. “Surely,” my beloved brethren, as it respects every one amongst us, “the Judge is at the door.” For aught that we know, we may this very day or hour be summoned into his presence, and receive at his hands our final doom — — —]

Yet, awful as the future judgment will be, we may well contemplate it,

II. As an event to be desired—

Not that it is desirable to all: for, when it shall arrive, many will call upon the rocks to fall upon them, and the hills to cover them from the presence of their Judge. To those only can it be an object of desire, who are “prepared to meet their God.” For this high attainment three things are requisite:

1. A view of salvation, as wrought out by Christ—

[The proud self-righteous moralist can never desire that day. He may indeed so harden himself in unbelief, as to feel no dread of judgment; and so deceive his own soul, as to think that the issue of it will be favourable to him. But he cannot look forward to that event with real satisfaction. He knows not what it is to be “looking for, and hasting unto, the coming of the day of Christ.” He has no solid ground of hope: when he reflects candidly on his state, he cannot but feel some secret misgivings, that all will not be well with him; and, consequently, he cannot really desire that day: on the contrary, it would be a satisfaction to him to be informed that there should be no discrimination of persons, and that all should sleep a perpetual sleep.]

2. A hope of salvation, as obtained through Christ—

[It is not a mere knowledge of the Gospel that will bear up the soul in the prospect of that great event. There must be in us some consciousness that we have fled to Christ for refuge, and laid hold on the hope that is set before us. It is a small matter to us that Christ has come into the world, and died for us, if we have not somewhat of a well-grounded hope of an interest in him. When we can see the promises as freely made to us, and are enabled to rest upon them, then may we look forward with composure to the dissolution of our earthly tabernacle, and to the transmission of our souls to “an house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens [Note: 2 Corinthians 5:1.].”]

3. An earnest of salvation, as already enjoyed in Christ—

[This is given to many of God’s favoured people: and, though I say not that it is necessary to saving faith, I must say, that without it no man can cordially adopt the language of my text, and say, “Even so, come, Lord Jesus.” We must have some assurance of our acceptance with God, before we can really desire to enter into his presence; and some sense of an interest in Christ, before we can truly “love his appearing.” But if “the Spirit of God bear witness with our spirits that we are his children,” then may we number death amongst our “treasures [Note: 1 Corinthians 3:22.],” and “desire to depart, that we may be with Christ.” Then may we adopt the triumphant language of the Apostle, and say, “O death, where is thy sting? O grave, where is thy victory?” for then our great enemy is slain, and “God has given us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ:” yea, “death is swallowed up in victory [Note: Isaiah 25:8. with 1 Corinthians 15:54-57.],” and heaven itself is commenced in the soul.]

Observe, then—

1. How sad is the prospect of those who are yet in their sins!

[Whether ye will believe it or not, know assuredly, that the Lord Jesus Christ is coming quickly, to call you into judgment: and to him shall ye give account, not only of your words and actions, but of the most “secret counsels of your hearts.” How terrible is this thought to those who have never repented of their sins, nor ever sought for mercy through the Redeemer’s blood! I would that I might prevail upon you, my beloved brethren, to lay to heart this awful consideration, whilst it may yet avail for your good. But let death once execute his commission, and drag you to the judgment-seat of Christ, and all your future regrets will be in vain: your sentence will then be pronounced upon you, and your doom be sealed for ever — — —]

2. What a sweet reality is there in religion!

[See what the Gospel can effect—can effect even in this present life! what peace it can bring into the soul; and what an assurance respecting its eternal interests! I will not presume to say that it will open to a man the book of God’s decrees, and shew him his name written in heaven; but it will give him a confidence respecting the issue of the future judgment, and a joyful anticipation of eternal blessedness. Only therefore seek an acquaintance with the Lord Jesus, and an experience of his love; and then may you look forward to his advent with exceeding joy, and welcome it as the consummation and completion of your bliss.]

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Simeon, Charles. "Commentary on Revelation 22:20". Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/shh/revelation-22.html. 1832.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Poole on "Revelation 22:13"

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Revelation 22:20". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/revelation-22.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

ей, гряду скоро! См. пояснение к 3:11. То, что требуется от верующих в свете этого будущего ожидания, изложено Петром (см. 2Пет. 3:11-18).

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Revelation 22:20". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/revelation-22.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

He; Jesus Christ.

I come quickly; to call each one to give an account of his stewardship, and to enter, according to his conduct and character, on the retributions of eternity. Whatever we do for our own salvation, or that of others, we must do soon; for in the grave to which we are hastening, there is no work. Ecclesiastes 9:10.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Revelation 22:20". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/revelation-22.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

He which testifieth these things saith, Surely I come quickly. Amen. Even so, come, Lord Jesus.

This is a most gracious repetition of Jesus's promise to his Church. It ought to be often in our thoughts. The Lord was then at the door of departure. He looks back once more. Before be takes a farewell, he sets his seal to his testimony, and, in his very last words, puts a surely to his often before repeated promise, and saith, surely I come quickly! And God the Holy Ghost by John, in the name of the Church, makes answer to his gracious promise, and saith, even so come Lord Jesus! Oh! precious Lord! is it not as if to say, though I leave off speaking publicly to the Church; I do not leave you in private. My heart, my affections are with you. I wilt come again, and take you to myself, that, where I am, there you may be also. Surely I come quickly! Even so, come Lord Jesus!

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Revelation 22:20". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/revelation-22.html. 1828.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

He who testifieth these things saith, Yea: I come quickly. Amen: come, Lord Jesus.

In this terse statement, "Christ sums up the book."[92] This also has the utility of revealing Christ as the author of the two previous verses. They are Christ's words, not even John's, much less the words of some nameless scribe.

Yea; I come quickly. Amen: come, Lord Jesus ... See under Revelation 22:17 for further discussion of the use of these expressions in the New Testament church. As Caird summed it up:

No one who has ever read John's book can have any doubt about what the prayer is asking. It is a prayer that Christ will come again to win in the faith of his servants the victory which is both Calvary and Armageddon.[93]

Caird also pointed out the responsive nature of this verse, indicating "its standing in the liturgical setting of the eucharist, answered by the eucharistic prayer maranatha (1 Corinthians 16:22)."[94] Beckwith also identified these last words with the maranatha of 1 Corinthians 16:22.[95] See under Revelation 22:17 for the mystical double meaning of this expression. Any argument from this that the early Christians expected the literal return of Christ in their generation is absolutely untenable. Many scholars do not understand how the church of all ages prays, "Oh, Lord come," without any sense of failure due to his not having come in his Second Advent, even yet; but the answer is right here in the double meaning of this passage.

As Criswell said:

It is hard for us finite creatures of the dust and of time to realize, that there is no such thing as "time" with God. He sees the beginning; he sees the end; he sees the present; and all are alike to him. Even to us the coming of the Lord "is near," as near as the length of our life away.[96]

[92] J. R. Dummelow, op. cit., p. 1092.

[93] G. B. Caird, op. cit., p. 288.

[94] Ibid.

[95] Isbon T. Beckwith, op. cit., p. 780.

[96] W. A. Criswell, op. cit., IV, p. 180.

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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Revelation 22:20". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/revelation-22.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Evidently John now quoted Jesus" promise to come soon. Christ"s promise to come soon was His response to the prayers of the Spirit, the bride, and the faithful hearers ( Revelation 22:17). "He who testifies to these things" is Jesus. The things in view are the words of Jesus in Revelation 22:12-19, but beyond that everything in this book (cf. Revelation 1:2). This is the third time in this pericope that we read that Jesus Christ promised to come quickly ( Revelation 22:7; Revelation 22:12). How can we doubt His word?

"Nor is it here alone, but throughout the New Testament in general, that such expressions are used. Everywhere is the promised Apocalypse of the Lord Jesus represented as close at hand, liable to occur at any time. The impression thus made upon the early Christians was, that Christ might come at any day or hour, even in their own lifetime. Exactly when he would come, was nowhere told them....

"Ever, as the Church moves on through time, and above all in the days in which we live, the next thing for every Christian to be looking for in this world is the coming of Christ to fulfill what is written in this Book. The Bible tells of nothing between us and that day." [Note: Seiss, p523.]

John added his "amen" affirming his belief that Jesus would come soon, and he voiced his personal petition that He would do so as He promised. This verse and the next are the only ones in Revelation that refer to Jesus Christ as the "Lord Jesus," though this title is common in other New Testament books. It acknowledges Jesus" deity and thus His right to judge.

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 22:20". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/revelation-22.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Revelation 22:20. He which testifieth these things saith Yea: I come quickly. Amen: Come, Lord Jesus. The structure of this verse resembles what we have already found to be that of Revelation 22:17, an exchange of sentiment between the Lord and the believer. Jesus Himself speaks first, testifying to that great truth of His Coming which has been the main theme of the whole revelation of this book; and adding, as suited the moment at which we have arrived, that He comes ‘quickly.’ To this the believer or the Church answers ‘Amen,’ and then adds, ‘Come, Lord Jesus.’ The Coming of Christ has been the source of her hope, the spring of her joy, throughout all her troubles. When she hears that it is at hand, what can she do but lift up her head and cry ‘Come’?

Nothing now remains but that the Apostle, as he had begun at chap. Revelation 1:4 in epistolary form, should in like manner close. He does it with a benediction which ought to read differently from that of the Authorised Version, The grace of the Lord Jesus be with the saints. The words are in striking harmony with what we have found to be the tone and character of the whole book. It was especially intended to describe the fortunes of ‘the saints;’ it was written for their sakes, to encourage and strengthen them; it has now reached a point at which we behold nothing but saints in the new heavens and new earth; and its closing salutation is to them.

Amen, so let it be.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Revelation 22:20". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/revelation-22.html. 1879-90.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Revelation 22:20. He which testifieth these things — Even all that is contained in this book; saith — For the encouragement of the church in all her afflictions, and the warning of all her opposers and persecutors; Surely I come quickly — To judge and punish all my enemies, and the enemies of my cause and people; and to establish my church in a state of perfect and everlasting happiness. The apostle expresses his earnest desire and hope of this, by answering, Amen. Even so, come, Lord Jesus — Accomplish thy promises in order: and finally crown the faith, patience, and constancy of thy servants with eternal life.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Revelation 22:20". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/revelation-22.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

-21

He that giveth testimony of these things, i.e. God, and Jesus Christ by an Angel, saith, surely, (or even so, or truly, these are certain truths) I come quickly, to reward the good and punish the evil. To which words St. John himself replieth with a zealous prayer and earnest desire, saying, Amen, let it be so. --- Come, Lord Jesus: come, and remain always in my soul by thy grace, and make me partaker of thy glory for ever and ever. Amen. (Witham) --- Conclusion. The Church in sighs and groans, and by the mouth of her children, solicits the coming of Jesus Christ, her divine Spouse. The fruit to be drawn from the perusal of this sacred book, is ardently to desire the kingdom of God, to sigh after the day of eternity, to feel the weight of the yoke of the present life, and the disgrace of our exile, and to live here below as strangers. Enkindle in me, O Lord, this desire; enable my poor soul to join with the beloved disciple in this prayer: Come Lord Jesus; that she may go and lose herself in Thee, who art her Centre, her God, her All.

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Revelation 22:20". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/revelation-22.html. 1859.

Gary Hampton Commentary on Selected Books

Jesus says he will come suddenly and John adds his prayer for a speedy coming to those of verse 17.

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Hampton, Gary. "Commentary on Revelation 22:20". "Gary Hampton Commentary on Selected Books". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ghc/revelation-22.html. 2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

quickly. Greek. tachu, as verses: Revelation 22:7, Revelation 22:12. The seventh and last solemn warning by the Lord Himself, in Rev., of His coming. It is the one great subject of the whole book, which is all prophecy. Amen. See Revelation 3:14 and 2 Corinthians 1:20.

Even so. The texts omit; and link "Amen" with John"s response, as Revised Version.

LORD. App-98. The use of the word "Lord" shows the utterance to be John"s. None of His people, when He was on earth, were ever so irreverent as to address Him as "Jesus",

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Revelation 22:20". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/revelation-22.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

He which testifieth these things saith, Surely I come quickly. Amen. Even so, come, Lord Jesus.

Amen. Even so, come. The Song of Solomon (Song of Solomon 8:14) closes with the same yearning prayer. A B 'Aleph (') omit "Even so" [ nai (Greek #3483)]. Translate, 'So be it (but 'Aleph (') omits Amen also), come, Lord Jesus:' joining "Amen," or 'So be it,' not with Christ's saying (for He calls Himself the "Amen" at the beginning of sentences, rather than make it a confirmation at the end), but with John's reply. Christ's "I come," and John's "Come," are almost coincident: so truly does the believer reflect the mind of his Lord.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 22:20". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/revelation-22.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(20) He which testifieth these things . . .—Better, He saith, who testifieth these things, Yea, I am coming quickly. We have here the final witness; it is in the words of the faithful and true witness Himself. It is the answer to the repeated cry, “Come;” it is the warning to those who forget Him; it is introduced with the emphatic yea! “Yea, I am coming quickly.” The answer breaks forth in prayer from the prophet’s lips—Amen. (We must omit “even so”) Come, Lord Jesus. The prophet is the mouthpiece of the Church; his desire is one with the desire of all who love Christ’s appearing.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Revelation 22:20". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/revelation-22.html. 1905.

Foy E. Wallace's Commentary on the Book of Revelation

Verse 20: He which testifieth these things saith, Surely I come quickly. Amen. Even so, come, Lord Jesus. Since John was here writing the epilogue to the apocalypse, and the vision had been completed, the reference to these words of Jesus was the quotation of what he had said to John in the vision. And the words, surely, I come quickly, were not in reference to the second coming of the Christ; but rather the promise to the churches in tribulation. He had so promised, and that repeatedly, to come in the events ready to occur; and the promise had been repeated to each of the seven churches in various forms. These events were shortly to take place and Jesus would therefore in keeping with his promise come quickly. John had testified that Jesus had so promised--and he consistently, believingly and confidently responded, Even so, come, Lord Jesus. And it is the recorded fact that their Lord Jesus did come in the events of that generation to which John belonged, the words of Jesus himself being true (Matthew 23:36--24:34 --and He whose very name was THE FAITHFUL AND TRUE and THE WORD OF GOD (chapter 19;11-13) was the surety for their fulfillment at that time. The word amen meant so may it be; and even so meant, exactly in that manner. The word even connected with so meant "precisely," and precise means minutely exact, not varying in the slightest degree from truth and accuracy; and so is an adverb of manner--therefore, the words amen, even so, come, Lord Jesus, meant "so may it be in this manner, come Lord Jesus." This was the apostle's six-word closing prayer to the Lord who had testified to him these things on the Aegean island.

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Wallace, Foy E. "Commentary on Revelation 22:20". "Foy E. Wallace's Commentary on the Book of Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/foy/revelation-22.html. 1966.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

He which testifieth these things saith, Surely I come quickly. Amen. Even so, come, Lord Jesus.
which
18
Surely
7,10,12
Amen
1:18; Song of Solomon 8:14; Isaiah 25:9; John 21:25; 2 Timothy 4:8; Hebrews 9:28; 2 Peter 3:12-14
Reciprocal: Psalm 40:17 - make;  Psalm 41:13 - Amen;  Psalm 50:3 - Our;  Psalm 70:5 - O Lord;  Psalm 72:19 - Amen;  Isaiah 35:4 - behold;  Jeremiah 28:6 - Amen;  Malachi 4:6 - and smite;  Matthew 25:10 - the bridegroom;  Matthew 28:20 - Amen;  John 21:22 - If;  Romans 9:5 - Amen;  Romans 13:11 - for now;  1 Corinthians 11:26 - till;  1 Corinthians 14:16 - Amen;  2 Corinthians 12:21 - and have not;  Philippians 4:5 - The;  Hebrews 10:37 - GeneralJames 5:8 - for;  Revelation 1:3 - for;  Revelation 1:7 - Even So;  Revelation 2:25 - till;  Revelation 3:11 - I come;  Revelation 22:16 - to testify

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Revelation 22:20". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/revelation-22.html.

Walter Scott's Commentary on Revelation

THE LORD'S FINAL MESSAGE TO THE CHURCH.

Revelation 22:20. — "He that testifies these things says, Yea, I come quickly. Amen; come, Lord Jesus." In the preceding message, which is one of a stern character, the Lord speaks in the first person; here the change to the third person is to be noted, but in both messages Christ is the testifier. "These things" refer to all contained in the Apocalypse. Thus the whole contents of the book are vouched for by the Lord Himself.

"Yea, I come quickly." It is the final message to the Church. It is the last word from Heaven till He come. The Old Testament was closed by the announcement of His Coming. The New Testament is closed by the intimation of the same grand event. But whilst the Coming is equally applied to the descent into the air (1 Thessalonians 4:1-18) as to His return to Mount Olivet (Zechariah 14:1-21), yet the connection is very different. Grace and judgment respectively stand related to these two comings, or rather to the two stages of the one Coming. The Old Testament closes with a threatened curse. The New Testament closes with a benediction of grace. Compare the last verse in each book.

"Yea" is the confirmation, the absolute certainty, of the truth stated, "I come quickly." This is His last spoken word. He has kept silence now for about two thousand years. But the event for which the Church prays and hopes is about to be fulfilled. The Lord is at hand. It has been a weary time, a waiting time, a suffering time, but His Coming, or presence, shall turn the gloom of night into gladness and everlasting joy. The shadows of time are passing away, and the first faint streaks of an eternal day, which knows neither evening nor tears, are almost discernible. Hold on, ye wearied pilgrim host! Joy cometh in the morning. We wait for Him, not for the fulfilment of prophecy. Is His Coming a reality in our souls? Does it influence the life, and shape the conduct, and impart vigour as we press on?

THE ANSWERING VOICE OF THE CHURCH.

20. — John, as the representative of the Church, answers the Lord's declaration. Doubtless his words formed the expression of his own desire. The aged Seer had witnessed visions and sights; had been the spectator and actor in scenes overwhelmingly grand, but on the fulfilment of this great fact they all repose: the personal return of the Lord. This was announced by the coming One Himself, and the heart of the aged apostle is thrilled. But led and controlled by the ever-present Holy Ghost he not only gives expression to his own feelings, but voices those of the whole Church, "Amen; come, Lord Jesus." The Yea and Amen, Greek and Hebrew affirmatives, are united in the introduction to the book (Revelation 1:7). Here they are separated. The Lord assures us of the certainty of His Coming, "Yea, I come." The Church rejoices in the immutability of His word, "Amen; come." Can this word fail? Impossible. Will the Lord not keep His tryst with His people? Surely. "Quickly" He comes. Ah! it seems long. But according to divine reckoning the Lord has not been away quite two full days (2 Peter 3:8). "The Lord is not slack concerning His promise." The persecutions and sorrows of Israel, the sins and griefs of a stricken earth, and the hopelessness and distractions of the professing Church call aloud for a Deliverer. All is the merest patchwork in political government and social legislation. A strong governing hand is needed, and this need will soon be met in Christ Jesus. But we have a personal interest in Him Who is Coming. For us He died, for us He lives, and for us He comes. "Amen; come, Lord Jesus," is the ardent exclamation of the Church of God.

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Scott, Walter. "Commentary on Revelation 22:20". "Walter Scott's Commentary on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sor/revelation-22.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

He which testifieth these things means Christ according to the statement in6 uickly is also stated in verses7,12and explained in connection with those passages. The word surely is added at this place for the sake of emphasis. The attitude of John to that announcement is that which every faithful disciple will have. In 2 Timothy 4:8 the apostle Paul is speaking of the crown to be given him at the coming of Christ. He says it will be for him but not for him only; it will be unto all them also that love his appearing. If a man is living a righteous life he will not dread to think either of death or the judgment.

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Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on Revelation 22:20". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/revelation-22.html. 1952.

Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation

Revelation 22:20

Revelation 22:21. This was the usual salutation of the apostles in their Epistles unto the churches of saints, 2 Corinthians 1:2; 2 Corinthians 13:14. All saving grace and spiritual peace, do flow from God through Jesus Christ, unto the churches and saints of God. Amen.

I conclude with an invitation to all the people of God to come out of BABYLON.

And I heard another voice from heaven, saying, come out of her my people, that ye be not partakers of her sins; and that ye receive not of her plagues. { Revelation 18:4} This call is the call of God our Saviour unto all his people in mystical Babylon (Papal Rome) to come out of HER. Come out of her my people: which call of Christ was given by an audible voice, And I heard another voice from heaven, saying, etc. And this call from heaven is urged and enforced upon the people of God by two cogent arguments or reasons, 1. That ye be not partakers of HER sins2. That ye receive not of her plagues.

Two things in this call need explanation, 1. What this voice was? 2. What it is to come out of HER? To both these I shall speak briefly, and then proceed to speak more largely of this call.

First, this voice hath heaven's authority, It was from heaven, to wit, the voice of Christ in the ministry of the gospel ordinarily, and by the powerful efficacy of the Holy Spirit also, For our gospel came not unto you in the word only, but also in power, and in the Holy Spirit, and in much assurance. { 1 Thessalonians 1:5} So had the voice of the angels of God by whom Christ then spake unto his servant John, { Revelation 14:6-13} with a loud voice, { Revelation 14:7} which St. John heard from heaven. { Revelation 14:13} And so have the voice of the faithful ministers of God, by whom Christ also now speaks unto his people, He that heareth you, heareth me, etc. to wit, heavens authority. {Luke 10:16}

Secondly, to come out of HER, is to separate themselves from the church of Rome, which is now become a false church, called the great whore, and mother of harlots. { 2 Corinthians 6:14-18} 2 Corinthians 6:17, Wherefore come out from among them, and be ye separate, saith the Lord. The Lord Jesus Christ would have his people to be separated under the gospel from the unbelieving Jews, and their false worship (which Christ called vain worship.) { Matthew 15:8-9} And St. Paul did separate the disciples from the Jewish synagogue of unbelievers. { Acts 19:8-9} And also from idolatrous gentiles, that worship images, (as the church of Rome doth) and from their idol temples, churches, and chapels; for the gentile papists, and church of Rome, their pope, cardinals, Jesuits, and all the roman priests do tread under foot the holy city. { Revelation 11:2} Jerusalem viz. the church and people of God, What agreement hath the Temple of God with idols? For ye are the Temple of the living God, as God hath said, { Leviticus 20:24-26; Leviticus 26:12} I will dwell among them, and walk among them; And I will be their God, and they shall be my people: wherefore come out from among them, and be ye separated saith the Lord, and touch not the unclean thing. { 2 Corinthians 6:16-17, etc} The papists images, crosses, crucifixes; their consecrated wafers, holy waters, and saints pictures, the image of the Virgin Mary, and of our Saviour upon the cross, unto which images the popish priests and people fall down and worship; yea their Ave Maria, and prayers to saints deceased, all their holy bells, beads, prayer books, and candles, etc. are all as an unclean thing, and ought to be separated from, and not touched by the people of God, whom Christ calls upon with a loud voice to come out from among them.

These two particulars explained the argument which Christ urgeth to enforce this his call unto his people followeth, That ye be not partakers of HER sins, and that ye receive not of HER plagues. As if Christ had said, I do by the voice of my faithful ministers call and command you my people to come out of mystical Babylon (Papal Rome) and to separate yourselves from the church of Rome, which is fallen, is fallen from her apostolical purity in doctrine, worship, and discipline or ecclesiastical government, and is become as harlot, a false church, the great Whore, the mother of harlots, and abominations of the earth, the synagogue of Satan, the habitation of devils, the hold of every foul spirit, and a cage of every unclean and hateful bird. But if you my people (as if Christ had said) will not obey my voice, nor hear my call; if you will not come out from the church of Rome, and separate yourselves from the papists, and leave going to and worshipping in their popish temples, churches, chapels, and private cloisters, nunneries, priories, religious houses, meeting places, and holy roods of auricular confession, etc. then in the first place you will be partakers of their sins, that Isaiah, you will become guilty of their will worship, and spiritual fornication, { Revelation 17:2} of their impenitency added upon their iniquities. And in the next place you shall receive of her plagues, death and mourning and famine, etc. { Revelation 18:8} And these shall drink of the wine of the wrath of God, which is poured out without mixture into the cup of his indignation. { Revelation 14:9-12}

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Knollys, Hanserd. "Commentary on Revelation 22:20". "Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hkc/revelation-22.html.

D.S. Clark's Commentary on Revelation

V:20. "He which testifieth these things saith, Surely I come quickly." And John responds: "Amen, Even Song of Solomon, come. Lord Jesus."

This coming has, in my humble judgment, no reference to the technical second personal coming of Christ, else it would not be described as "quickly," and as something which in John"s day "must shortly come to pass."

We believe that Christ will come again, we believe that coming will be personal, but we submit that it is an inaccurate and unscholarly piece of interpretation to apply these passages in Revelation to that event. But the "coming quickly" evidently referred to events in John"s immediate foreground, and which concerned the churches to which he addressed these words. True reverence for the Scriptures will seek to understand them in the meaning intended by the writer, and will seek to put upon them the construction that is evident and natural from the writer"s viewpoint. The wise expositor will hold fast to this sound rule of interpretation.

The judgment upon the Jewish and Roman persecutors, and the vindication of the persecuted saints most naturally fall in line with the significance of "coming quickly," and with John"s response: "Even so come, Lord Jesus."

Thus we close this book of The Revelation so full of solemn warnings, and dire judgments, fitted to fill us all with awe, and to strike fear into the heart of the impenitent sinner. But through all the thunder of doom and the smoke of judgment we read the lesson of hope and cheer. The loftiest optimism grows out of the study of these solemn scenes.

Who can miss the lesson that the enemies of God and of the church are doomed to fall; but that Christ"s cause is always and everywhere triumphant, that the omnipotent God is on the side of his church and no weapon formed against it shall prosper; but through all the revolutions and persecutions and dissolutions of earth and time he will bring it off triumphant and present it to himself a glorious church not having spot nor wrinkle nor any such thing. Every judgment recorded in the book of Revelation spells victory for the church of God, — and the end — the beatific destiny of the new Jerusalem where they shall be his people and he shall be their God.

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Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Revelation 22:20. He who testifies these things says: Yea, I come quickly. Amen, come Lord Jesus. He who testifies these things is Christ (comp. at ch. Revelation 1:2; Revelation 1:5). The "Amen, come Lord Jesus," is spoken by the Spirit through Jesus, or by John in the Spirit.

The "I come quickly," is the sum of the prophetic announcements of the book. That the church with full confidence may say the Amen, come Lord Jesus, is the great practical design of this book. Where this design is accomplished, there all tribulation, anxiety, and pain are overcome, and there fidelity shall be found to be invincible. Bengel, "The expression these things refers to the whole book, Revelation 22:6; Revelation 22:18; John 21:24, ‘This is the disciple who testifies of these things.'"

Revelation 22:21. The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with all saints. The variations in the text have arisen from a comparison of the forms of salutation used by Paul at the close of his epistles; which was the more natural, as John himself undoubtedly had respect to these Pauline salutations (comp. at ch. Revelation 1:4). The reading followed by Luther: "The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with you all," agrees literally with the conclusion of the epistle to the Romans. The "with all," which Tischendorf has admitted into the text, suits as little as the "with you all." The circle of readers was not definitely enough marked by it. It must at the close be once more distinctly expressed, that the book is the property of the whole Christian church on earth, that all who belong to the number of saints are warranted and bound to seek in it their edification, and must give an account how they have used the means of salvation it provided. When it shall be said, Give an account of thy stewardship, the word here "with all saints" will also come to be mentioned.

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Bibliographical Information
Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on Revelation 22:20". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/revelation-22.html.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

5. John’s final welcome to the Coming—BENEDICTION, Revelation 22:20-21.

20.Testifieth these things—Jesus, who attests his sending the revelation, and the deep danger of corrupting or undermining his truth.

Come, Lord JesusCome with that coming which brings the final glory. Note Revelation 22:17.

 

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Revelation 22:20". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/revelation-22.html. 1874-1909.