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Bible Dictionaries

Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary

Bitter Herbs

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מרודים . Exodus 12:8 , and Numbers 9:11 . The Jews were commanded to eat their passover with a sallad of bitter herbs; but whether one particular plant was intended, or any kind of bitter herbs, has been made a question. By the Septuagint it is rendered επι πικριδων ; by Jerom, "cum lactucis agrestibus;" and by the Gr. Venet., επι πικρισιν . Dr. Geddes remarks, that "it is highly probable that the succory or wild lettuce is meant." The Mischna in

Pesachim, cap. 2, reckons five species of these bitter herbs:

1. Chazareth, taken for lettuce:

2. Ulsin, supposed to be endive or succory:

3. Tamca, probably tansy:

4. Charubbinim, which Bochart thought might be the nettle, but

Scheuchzer shows to be the camomile:

5. Meror, the sow-thistle, or dent-de-lion, or wild lettuce.

Mr. Forskal says, "the Jews in Sana and in Egypt eat the lettuce with the paschal lamb." He also remarks, that moru is centaury, of which the young stems are eaten in February and March.

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Bibliography Information
Watson, Richard. Entry for 'Bitter Herbs'. Richard Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary. https://www.studylight.org/dictionaries/eng/wtd/b/bitter-herbs.html. 1831-2.

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