Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Samuel 5:25

Then David did so, just as the Lord had commanded him, and struck down the Philistines from Geba as far as Gezer.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Armies;   David;   Gazer;   Geba;   Philistines;   Prayer;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Armies of Israel, the;   Rephaim, or Giants, the;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Geba;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Philistia, philistines;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Geba;   Gezer;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Ahijah;   Gazer;   Geba;   Gezer;   Philistia;   Saul;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Ashdod;   Gazer;   Gezer;   Philistines, the;   Samuel, Books of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - David;   Geba;   Israel;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Geba ;   Gezer, Gezrites ;   Gibeon ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Gezer;   Rephaim;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Ga'zer;   Philis'tines;   Reph'a-Im, the Valley of,;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Hebrew Monarchy, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Geba;   Gezer;   Gibeon;   Samuel, Books of;   Siege;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Geba;   Gezer;   Gibeah;   Gibeon and Gibeonites;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

And David did so - He punctually obeyed the directions of the Lord, and then every thing succeeded to his wish.

How is it that such supernatural directions and assistances are not communicated now? Because they are not asked for; and they are not asked for because they are not expected; and they are not expected because men have not faith; and they have not faith because they are under a refined spirit of atheism, and have no spiritual intercourse with their Maker. Who believes that God sees all things and is everywhere? Who supposes that he concerns himself with the affairs of his creatures? Who acknowledges him in all his ways? Who puts not his own wisdom, prudence, and strength, in the place of God Almighty? Reader, hast thou faith in God? Then exercise it, cultivate it, and thou mayest remove mountains.

It is worthy of remark that David was, by the appointment of God, to feed the people. As he had formerly the care of a flock of sheep, which he was to watch over, defend, lead in and out, and for which he was to find pasture; now he is to watch over, defend, lead in and out, feed, and protect, the Israelites. He is to be the shepherd of the people, not the tyrant or oppressor.

In ancient times, among the Greeks, kings were denominated ποιμενες λαου, shepherds of the people; and all good kings were really such: but, in process of time, this pleasing title was changed for βασιλευς and τυραννος, sovereign and tyrant; in neither of which names does any thing of the original title exist. And such are the different political constitutions of the kingdoms of the earth, that it is impossible that in any of them, the British excepted, the king can be the shepherd and father of his people. All the other regal constitutions under the sun permit the sovereign to be despotic, and consequently oppressive and tyrannical if he please. The British alone gives no power of this kind to the prince; by the constitution he is a patriotic king, and by the influence of those maxims of state which are continually presented to his view, and according to which all acts of government are formed, he becomes habitually the father of his people, and in this light alone do the British people behold the British king.

David, by his own authority, without any form of law, could slay the Amalekite who said he had killed Saul; and could cut off the heads of Rechab and Baanah, who murdered Ish-bosheth; but, in the government of Britain, the culprit is to be heard in his vindication, witnesses are to be examined, the facts viewed by an upright judge in the light of the law; and then the alleged criminality is left to the decision of twelve honest men, the equals of the accused, who are bound by a solemn oath to decide according to the evidence brought before them. The Israelitish constitution was radically good, but the British constitution is much better. In the former, while the king ruled according to the spirit of the constitution, he could do no wrong, because he was only the vicegerent of the Almighty; in the latter, the king can do no wrong, because he is bound both by the spirit and letter of the law, to do nothing but what is according to the rules of eternal justice and equity laid down in that law; nothing is left to mere regal power or authority, and nothing trusted to human fickleness or caprice. In all his acts he is directed by his nobles and commons; who, being the representatives of all classes of the people, are always supposed to speak their mind. Well may it be said, Blessed are the people who are in such a case!

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:25". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/2-samuel-5.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Geba - Better, as in marginal reference “Gibeon.” Gazer should be “Gezer” (Joshua 10:33, etc.); it lay between the nether Bethhoron and the sea; on the direct route therefore which the Philistines, fleeing from Gibeon, would take. The exact site has now been identified (1 Kings 9:16).

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:25". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/2-samuel-5.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

2 Samuel 5:25

And David did so.

Marching orders

Each day read your chapter or passage with the idea that you are receiving your marching orders; that there is some new service to render, some new duty to perform, some new virtue to acquire. Let the attitude of your soul be indicated by Samuel’s words, “Speak, Lord, for Thy servant heareth.” When you hear, do! (F. B. Meyer.)

Do present duty

Procrastination is reckoned among the most venial of our faults, and sits so lightly on our minds that we scarcely apologise for it. But who can assure us that had not the assistance we had resolved to give to one friend in distress, or the advice to another under temptation to-day been delayed, and from mere sloth and indolence put off till to-morrow, it might not have preserved the fortune of the one, or saved the soul of the other? It is not enough that we perform duties; we must perform them at the right time. We must do the duty of every day in its own season. Every day has its own imperious duties; we must not depend upon to-day for fulfilling those Which we neglected yesterday, for to-day might not have been granted to us. Tomorrow will be equally peremptory in its demands, and the succeeding day, if we live to see it, will be ready with its proper duties. (Hannah More.)

The grasp of opportunity

Writing an article on Social Economy especially in reference to wages and industrial progress, Professor Atkinson says: “The man who had the shrewdness and capacity to seize the opportunity afforded by recent science and invention had made progress, wealth, success. While from him who had not the foresight or mental aptitude to adjust himself to the new conditions, had been taken away even the opportunity for common labour which he enjoyed before.”

Individual activity

Whatever noble work on earth is to be done you must do it yourself. If you leave it to others it will never be done. Do it yourself. Put away that poorest of poor spirits which would treat good wishes or benedictions, or even prayers, as substitutes for personal service. (Bishop Welldon.)

Doing your duty

There is one lesson which all agree that the Duke of Wellington taught, and which we are specially desirous of pointing out, viz., that throughout life, he made it a rule to do whatever he saw to be his duty at the time--a more rare and valuable quality than many suppose, unless they remember that it was a rule which he applied to small things as well as great, to the answering of a letter, and to the movement of an entire army. While he notoriously confined himself strictly to his own duties, anything and everything was regarded as a duty when laid upon him by legitimate and competent authority. It was no question for him whether the thing were too small for his powers or his dignity; he was required to do it, he could do it, and he did it--did it with all his might, whatever it was. Great as he was, he has in this left an example to the least, as well as to the greatest--to the young as well as to the old. (Great Thoughts.)
.

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Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "2 Samuel 5:25". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/2-samuel-5.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And David did so as the Lord commanded him,.... In all things he was obedient to the command of God; Saul was not: he got behind the army of the Philistines, as he was directed; and when he heard the sound in the mulberry trees, he arose and fell upon his enemies:

and smote the Philistines from Geba until thou come to Gazer; or from Gibeon, as in 1 Chronicles 14:16; a city in the tribe of Benjamin, near to which this battle was fought, and where the pursuit began, which was carried as far as Gazer, a city that lay on the borders of the Philistines, as Josephus saysF2Antiqu. l. 7. c. 4. sect. 1. ; and so far they were pursued, and were smitten as they fled; and, according to BuntingF3Travels, &c. p. 138. , it was a space of eighteen miles.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:25". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-samuel-5.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And David did so, as the LORD had commanded him; and smote the Philistines from Geba until thou come to h Gazer.

(h) Which was in the tribe of Benjamin, but the Philistines possessed it.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:25". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/2-samuel-5.html. 1599-1645.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

REFLECTIONS

BEFORE we quit this very instructive Chapter, let us, my Christian friend, look at it once more; and while we view the zeal of all the tribes of Israel in anointing David king, let you and I see whether we have manifested an equal readiness to bend the knee to the sceptre of grace before our Jesus, and crown him Lord of all. It is God the Father that hath constituted him in his mediatorial glory, King in Zion; while, in the fullness of his Godhead he is one with the Father, Universal Lord over all, God blessed forevermore. And in his Almighty hands are the issues of life and death, spiritual, temporal, and eternal. Yes! blessed Jesus, thy kingdom is thy church; thy body, thy fair one, thy spouse: thou art of our kindred, and we of thine, thy bone and thy flesh. Thou hast fought, and art still fighting for us all our battles. Thou hast led us out, and brought us in. Thou feedest thy people with thyself, for thou art both the bread of life, and the water of life. And surely the love, the service, the voluntary homage of thy people, when thou hast made them willing in the day of thy power, is thy lawful, just, and proper right. And when thou hast taken away the blind, and the lame, and entered by thine own Almighty arm and power, into the strong holds of Zion; oh! Lord Jesus, do thou dwell there, and make our souls and bodies thy temple of abode. Reader! have you and I thus bent the knee to Jesus? Have we crowned him with the crown of free grace, in ascribing all salvation to him? Is he dear, is he precious, is he the altogether lovely, is he the Lord our righteousness? Dearest Jesus! give both him that writes, and him that reads, grace to say amen: and let every high thing that would exalt itself against his sovereignty be brought down, and every thought brought into captivity to the obedience and love of Christ.

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:25". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/2-samuel-5.html. 1828.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Samuel 5:25 And David did so, as the LORD had commanded him; and smote the Philistines from Geba until thou come to Gazer.

Ver. 25. To Gazer.] Which was a city of the Philistines, saith Josephus.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:25". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-samuel-5.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

They followed their victory, and pursued them to their own borders, in which Gazer was, as Josephus relates.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:25". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-samuel-5.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

25.From Geba — Rather, from Gibeon, as in 1 Chronicles 14:16, for Geba (see note on 1 Samuel 13:3) lay to the northeast of Jerusalem, and it is not supposable that the Philistines would have passed near it in their flight. For the site of Gibeon see on Joshua 9:3.

Gazer — The same as Gezer, whose exact site has not been identified with any modern town, but must be sought somewhere between the Lower Beth-horon and the Sea. See on Joshua 10:33.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:25". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-samuel-5.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Gabaa, which some would understand of "the hills" of Bochim. (Calmet) --- But in Septuagint (Alexandrian) and in Paralipomenon, we read Gabaon, a city near the birth-place of Saul. (Haydock) --- David pursued the enemy by Gabaa, and took from them all the cities of which they had taken possession, after their victory. (Calmet) --- Gezer was in the tribe of Ephraim, (Menochius) on the confines of the Philistines. (Calmet)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:25". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/2-samuel-5.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

as = according as.

Geba. Abbreviation for "Gibeon". Compare Septuagint, and 1 Chronicles 14:16.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:25". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-samuel-5.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And David did so, as the LORD had commanded him; and smote the Philistines from Geba until thou come to Gazer.

Geba until thou come to Gazer. For Geba, see the notes at 1 Samuel 14:1-52 :; Gazer (cf. 1 Chronicles 14:16), or, as elsewhere, Gezer. It stands in Porter's, 'Handbook' in the list of places not yet identified. 'But,' says Mr. Grove (Smith's 'Dictionary,' sub voce), 'its general position is not difficult to infer.' It must have been between the lower Beth-horon and the sea (Mediterranean, Joshua 16:3; 1 Kings 4:17); therefore on the great maritime plain which lies beneath the hills of which Beitur et-Tahta is the last outpost, sad the regular coast road of communication with Egypt (1 Kings 9:16). It is therefore appropriately named as the last point to which David's pursuit of the Philistines extended on the occasion referred to in the context.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:25". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/2-samuel-5.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(25) From Geba . . . to Gazer.—In the parallel passage (1 Chronicles 14:16) it is “from Gibeon to Gazer.” One or the other is a slip of the scribe, and there can be little question that Gibeon is the true reading, since it lies about five and a half miles northwest of Jerusalem, while Geba (Gibeah) is about seven and a half miles north-east. The site of Gazer (or Gezer) has not been exactly identified, but it was certainly just on the edge of the Philistine plain. The distance of the pursuit from Gibeon was about twelve miles, and six miles more must already have been passed over before reaching Gibeon from the valley of Rephaim. The flight of the Philistines was determined in this north-westerly direction at first, from the fact that David had “fetched a compass,” and attacked them from the south. In 1 Chronicles 14:8-17, these battles are placed between the unsuccessful (2 Samuel 13:5-14) and the successful (2 Samuel 15) attempts to bring up the ark to Jerusalem. It is impossible now to determine the exact details of the chronology.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:25". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-samuel-5.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And David did so, as the LORD had commanded him; and smote the Philistines from Geba until thou come to Gazer.
Geba
1 Chronicles 14:16
Gibeon
Gazer.
Joshua 16:10 Reciprocal: Psalm 18:29 - by thee;  Isaiah 28:21 - the valley

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:25". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-samuel-5.html.