Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Samuel 7:18

Then David the king went in and sat before the Lord , and he said, "Who am I, O Lord God , and what is my house, that You have brought me this far?
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - David;   House;   Humility;   Prayer;   Scofield Reference Index - Bible Prayers;   Thompson Chain Reference - Ask;   Christ;   Church;   Family;   Humility;   Humility-Pride;   Importunity;   Prayer;   Secret Prayer;   United Prayer;   Unwise Prayers;   Wicked, the;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Prayer, Private;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Temple;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Israel;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Chronicles, Books of;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Midwives;   Prayer;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Gestures;   Samuel, Books of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Adoration;   Covenant;   David;   Jerusalem;   Nathan;   Prayer;   Samuel, Books of;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - David ;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Temple;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - David;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Houses;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Hebrew Monarchy, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Adoration;   Christ, Offices of;   Hitherto;   Intercession;   Nathan (1);   Promise;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Aibu (Ibu) B. Naggari;   Prayer;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Sat before the Lord - Sometimes, when a Hindoo seeks a favor from a superior, he sits down in his presence in silence; or if he solicits some favor of a god, as riches, children, etc., he places himself before the idol, and remains in a waiting posture, or repeats the name of the god, counting the beads in his necklace. - Ward.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 7:18". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/2-samuel-7.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Sat before the Lord - In the tent where the ark was. Standing or kneeling was the usual attitude of prayer (1 Kings 8:22, 1 Kings 8:54-55; but compare Exodus 17:12). Modern commentators mostly take the word here in the sense of waiting, abiding, not sitting: but sat is the natural rendering. David sat down to meditate, and then rose up to pray.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 7:18". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/2-samuel-7.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

DAVID'S PRAYER OF GRATITUDE TO GOD

"Then King David went in and sat before the Lord, and said, "Who am I, O Lord God, and what is my house, that thou hast brought me thus far? And yet this was a small thing in thy eyes, O Lord God; thou hast spoken also of thy servant's house for a great while to come, and hast shown me future generations, O Lord God. And what more can David say to thee? For thou knowest thy servant, O Lord God! Because of thy promise, and according to thine own heart, thou hast wrought all this greatness to make thy servant know it. Therefore thou art great, O Lord God; for there is none like thee, and there is no God besides thee, according to all that we have heard with our ears. What other nation on earth is like thy people Israel, whom God went to redeem to be his people, making himself a name, and doing for them great and terrible things, by driving out before his people a nation and its gods? And thou didst establish for thyself thy people Israel to be thy people forever; and thou, O Lord, didst become their God. And now, O Lord God, confirm forever the word which thou hast spoken concerning thy servant and concerning his house, and do as thou hast spoken; and thy name will be magnified forever, saying, `The Lord of Hosts is God over Israel,' and the house of thy servant David will be established before thee. For thou, O Lord of hosts, the God of Israel, hast made this revelation to thy servant David, saying, `I will build you a house'; therefore thy servant has found courage to pray this prayer to thee. And now, O Lord God, thou art God, and thy words are true, and thou hast promised this good thing to thy servant; now therefore may it please thee to bless the house of thy servant, that it may continue forever before thee; for thou, O Lord God, hast spoken, and with thy blessing shall the house of thy servant be blessed forever."

This remarkable prayer has a number of very interesting features.

"David went in and sat before the Lord" (2 Samuel 7:18). This is an unusual posture for prayer; and a number of scholars interpret it to mean that he knelt down and leaned back on his heels, looking upward, similar to what Moslems do today.

"O Lord God" (2 Samuel 7:19,20,22,24,25,28,29). Two different words for God are used in these verses, as well as several other names such as "Lord of Hosts," and "God of Israel," another example among hundreds of others that multiple names for God never meant either "various sources" or multiple authors.

"Thou hast shown me future generations" (2 Samuel 7:19). It was indeed many generations later when Jeconiah, the last of David's earthly house to sit on his throne, lived out his days in Babylon.

"Driving out before his people a nation and its gods" (2 Samuel 7:23). This word in David's prayer indicates his understanding of why God had replaced the Canaanites with Israel. It was all because of the idolatry of the Canaanites.

"Thou didst establish for thyself thy people Israel to be thy people forever" (2 Samuel 7:24). There is hardly any way that David could have understood that such a truth as this had no reference whatever to any mere race of people; but that God's Israel in future times would be defined solely and exclusively as the servants and followers of that Greater Son of David, not any of Israel's wicked monarchs, but the Christ of Glory.

"May it please thee that the house of thy servant may continue forever before thee" (2 Samuel 7:29). There can be little doubt that David's prayer here was a plea upon behalf of his physical posterity, but God's answer of such a prayer uttered by a faithful and loving parent must always depend to a great extent upon the descendants of such a parent. When the physical descendants of David became wicked and reprobate, they, along with all of the apostate nation, were displaced and punished by their exile in Babylon. However, there were two very significant ways in which God answered this prayer.

(1) The descendants of David were indeed continued upon the earth "before the Lord" until, in the fullness of time, the terminal heir to David's throne, namely, Joseph the son of Jacob, was able to pass it on to Christ the Messiah, who was the legal heir of Joseph, but not his literal son (Matthew 1:16).

(2) The other way consisted in the continuity of David's personal descendants through his son Nathan, until Jesus Christ was born miraculously of the Virgin Mary (whose husband Joseph was the son-in-law of Heli, Mary's father. See Luke 3:23) the daughter of Heli, directly descended from David through Nathan. Thus in this manner, David's house was continued "forever" before the Lord, especially in consequence of the fact that Christ himself and the total of that Israel (of all races and kindreds of men) which constitutes his "spiritual body" are also reckoned in the "house of David" (Matthew 1:1).

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 7:18". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/2-samuel-7.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Then went King David in,.... Into the tabernacle where the ark was, which he had prepared for it, 2 Samuel 6:17,

and sat before the Lord; before the ark, the symbol of his presence, and prayed, and gave thanks, as follows: from whence it appears that a sitting posture was sometimes used in prayer, of which we have other instances, Exodus 17:11. It is saidF25Vid. D. Herbert. de Cherbury de Relig. Gent. c. 7. p. 65. that Pythagoras, and also Numa, ordered that worshippers should sit. So that this act of devotion is not to be limited to any particular posture, though it seems most agreeable either to stand or kneel; and the Jews look upon this to be a peculiar case, and infer from hence that none were allowed to sit in the court but the kings of the house of JudahF26T. Bab. Yoma, fol. 69. 2. Maimon & Bartenor. in Misn. Yoma, c. 7. sect. 1. ; and some of themF1Midrash in Abarbinel in loc. will not allow that to them, since the seraphim above are even said to stand, Isaiah 6:2; and suppose the meaning of this to be only that David supported himself in the court; and some render the words, "he remained before the Lord"F2וישב "et mansit", Vatablus. ; he continued in meditation, prayer, and thanksgiving, and such like acts of devotion, for a considerable time; so the Targum, in 1 Chronicles 17:16."King David came and continued in prayer before the Lord:"

and he said, who am I, O Lord God? a creature, a sinful creature, a mean and unworthy one, undeserving of a place in the house of God, and of access unto him, and to receive any favour from him, less than the least of all saints, less than the least of all mercies:

and what is my house: or family of which he was, the family of Jesse; for though it sprung from a prince in Israel, yet was but low and mean, in comparison of some others, and especially unworthy of the regard of the great God:

that thou hast brought me hitherto? to such grandeur and dignity, as to be king over all Israel and Judah, to have all his enemies subdued under him, and to be at peace and rest from them, and established in his kingdom; and which he signifies the Lord alone had brought him to, through many difficulties and tribulations, and which he could never have attained unto by his own wisdom and power, nor by the assistance of his friends; it was all the Lord's doing, and wondrous in his eyes.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 7:18". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-samuel-7.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

2 Samuel 7:18-29. David‘s prayer and thanksgiving.

Then went king David in, and sat before the Lord — Sitting was anciently an attitude for worship (Exodus 17:12; 1 Samuel 4:13; 1 Kings 19:4). As to the particular attitude David sat, most probably, upon his heels. It was the posture of the ancient Egyptians before the shrines; it is the posture of deepest respect before a superior in the East. Persons of highest dignity sit thus when they do sit in the presence of kings and it is the only sitting attitude assumed by the modern Mohammedans in their places and rites of devotion.

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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 7:18". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/2-samuel-7.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Then went king David in, and sat before the LORD, and he said, Who am I, O Lord GOD? and what is my house, that thou hast brought me hitherto?

In — Into the tabernacle.

Sat — He might sit for a season whilst he was meditating upon these things, and then alter his posture and betake himself to prayer.

Who am I, … — How infinitely unworthy am I and my family of this great honour and happiness!

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 7:18". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/2-samuel-7.html. 1765.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

DAVID AT PRAYER

‘Then went king David in, and sat before the Lord, and said,’ etc.

2 Samuel 7:18

We are chiefly concerned with the matter of David’s prayer.

We have said that he was alone with God. Consequently we find here much as to David, but even more as to God.

I. Now see what David says of himself.—‘Who am I, O Lord God, and what is my house, that Thou hast brought me hitherto?’ His tone was very humble. He owed nothing to himself or to his parentage.

‘Is this the manner of man, O Lord God?’ He does not assume, as some do, to understand the philosophy of God’s actions (19). The words are not quite clear, but they probably mean either that God’s ways are not man’s ways (‘And this is the law of man’), or that he was amazed that this decree (16) should be made for such weak human beings as himself and his descendants. ‘Can this be the kind of man God chooses?’ As the old saint cried, when wave upon wave of Divine communion rolled over his soul, ‘Why me, Lord, why me?’

But he accepted at once the honour put upon him. ‘What can David say more unto Thee? for Thou, Lord God, knowest Thy servant.’ There is no true modesty in shrinking back, as Moses did at first when he was called in the wilderness. It is always safe to be in the way of God’s appointing.

For David saw now (19, 21) that he was an instrument in God’s hands. ‘For Thy word’s sake, and according to Thine own heart, hast Thou done all these things, to make Thy servant know them.’ God was fulfilling Himself. He is faithful to His promises and to His purposes.

One more point as to himself. Humble, not pretending to understand God’s dealings; meekly accepting these great honours which were laid upon him; recognizing that he was simply an instrument in God’s hands, David saw also that if he and his son were to be established upon the throne it would have to be by their remaining close to God. See how he links these two together. ‘Let Thy name be magnified, and let the house of David be established before Thee.’ Had David always lived ‘more nearly as he prayed’ his reign would have been even more glorious than it was.

II. Notice, again, what David says here as to God.—Much may be learned from the titles with which he addresses God. ‘O Lord God.’ Wherever God is thus printed in small capitals it represents the sacred name of Jehovah. From very ancient times the Jewish practice in reading the Scriptures has been to substitute in place of Jehovah Adonai, which means my Lord, or Lord; or if the title Adonai is joined with Jehovah, as here (v. 18), Elohim which means God. The English version follows the Jewish practice in giving Lord and God, and whenever they represent the name Jehovah indicates the fact by the use of capitals, ‘Lord God,’ which represents ‘my Lord Jehovah,’ must therefore be disguished from ‘Lord God’ (v. 25) which represents Jehovah Elohim, i.e. ‘Jehovah God.’ ‘O Lord God’ (18) ‘O Lord God’ (22), ‘their God’ (24), ‘The Lord of hosts’ (26), here are the names which David uses.

Briefly, we may sum up the principal points as to what David says about God.

He recognises God’s supremacy (22), His universal government (23–25), His glory (‘let Thy name be magnified,’ 26), His special and personal care for David (27), and His sure faithfulness (28, 29). It is natural to ask, Were these great promises made to David and to his descendants fulfilled? Literally, they were not. They were made conditional (14), and the conditions were broken. But the spiritual kingdom was established in the person of Christ. ‘Great David’s greater Son.’ ‘Unto the Son He saith, Thy Throne, O God, is for ever and ever: a sceptre of righteousness is the sceptre of Thy kingdom.’ It is impossible to do full justice to this prophecy without going through David to Him Who, while He was David’s Son, was also David’s Lord. This is a good time in which to say a word or two as to prayer. For one thing, is it not in the highest degree reasonable? David comes at once into living contact with his best friend, with the Lord of hosts, with the Governor of the whole universe. Prayer links him in with all that is best and wisest and strongest in earth and heaven. But was not David disappointed when the answer to his dearest wish was made known to him? He was like Moses, who came to the borders of Canaan and yet entered not in. He did want to build the house for God himself. Prayer is not always answered as we expect or hope. We may say ‘to-day,’ but God may say ‘to-morrow.’ We may say ‘I,’ but God may say ‘thy son.’ If every letter were to be answered just as we expected, there would be no need for any answer at all. God’s appointments are often man’s disappointments. Take them where David took his, into the presence of God. The light which fills the hour of prayer is the only light in which to read God’s will concerning us.

Illustrations

(1) ‘Notice two things about David praying: (1) He went direct to God. Nathan, who appears now for the first time, was a pure-hearted, fearless man, “the hope of the new generation,” but when David prayed he did not call in Nathan. In the great emergencies of life prayer is personal and private. It belongs only to God and the soul. (2) David prayed in the accustomed place. “He went in.” Prayer anywhere may soon become prayer nowhere. He does not now remain in his house, but he goes into the sanctuary. It is well that many churches are open in the business hours of the week for any who desire a quiet minute or two just when the tide of life runs fastest.’

(2) ‘The main lesson of David’s prayer is that promise should ever be the basis and measure of prayer. The mould into which our petitions should run is, “Do as Thou hast said.” There is no presumption in taking God at His word. Let us seek to stretch our desires to the width of God’s promises, and to confine our wishes within their bounds.’

(3) ‘“According to His own heart” (v. 20) God blesses me. I fancy that this second clause outruns and surpasses the first, glorious although the first is. The language of the lips cannot unveil all that lies in the soul; the promises of my Lord do not explain and exhaust His thoughts of peace: God’s heart is fuller, profounder, sweeter, more mysterious, more ineffable, than God’s word. Only heaven and the everlasting ages will reveal to me what He has planned and what he has gained for me in Jesus Christ, my “boundless and running over” Lord. Am I not a prince in the blood-royal of the skies?’

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Nisbet, James. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 7:18". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/2-samuel-7.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Samuel 7:18 Then went king David in, and sat before the LORD, and he said, Who [am] I, O Lord GOD? and what [is] my house, that thou hast brought me hitherto?

Ver. 18. And sat before the Lord.] So Elias sat under the juniper, and prayed; Stephen kneeled; [Acts 7:60] so did Paul and his company. [Acts 20:36] The publican stood and prayed. [Luke 18:13] And the Jews had a proverb, Absque stationibus non subsisteret mundus: Were it not that the saints stood in prayer, the world would not stand. The rule here given for gesture in prayer is, that that is to be used in private which we find fittest to excite our inward devotion; and that in public there be a uniformity observed.

Who am I, O Lord?] Thus use good men to vilify and nullify themselves before the Lord. [Proverbs 30:2]

That thou hast brought me hitherto?] Eξ οιων εις οια, as that noble Iphicrates said: How greatly am I advanced? May not every saint say as much See Ezekiel 16:3-15.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 7:18". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-samuel-7.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

2 Samuel 7:18. And sat before the Lord Dr. Pococke, in his first volume, p. 213, has given us the figure of a person half sitting, and half kneeling; that is, kneeling so far as to rest the most muscular part of his body on his heels: which, he observes, is the manner in which inferior persons sit at this day before great men, and that it is considered as a very humble posture. Agreeably to which he informs us, in his second volume, p. 102, that the attendants of the English consul, when he waited on the Caiah of the Pasha of Tripoli, sat in this manner resting behind on their hams. In this manner, I suppose, it was that David sat before the Lord, when he went into the sanctuary to bless him for his promise concerning his family. Abarbanel, and some Christian expositors, seem perplexed about the word sitting before the Lord; but sitting after this manner was expressive of the greatest humiliation, and therefore no improper posture for one who appeared before the ark of God. Observations, p. 263.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 7:18". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/2-samuel-7.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Sat: this word may note either, first, His bodily posture, for there is no certain gesture to which prayer is limited and we have examples of saints praying in that posture, Exodus 17:12 1 Kings 19:4; or he might sit for a season whilst he was meditating upon these things, and then alter his posture, (though it be not here expressed,) and betake himself to prayer. Or rather, secondly, His continuance, as this Hebrew word is oft used, as Genesis 22:11 Leviticus 14:8 1 Samuel 1:22 20:19, that he did not barely present himself before God but abode there for some competent time, that he might with God’s leave pour out his soul freely before him. For howsoever one may in some cases pray sitting, yet it is most probable that David would in this holy place, and upon this occasion, use a more humble and reverent gesture, such as kneeling is, which therefore David prescribeth or adviseth, Psalms 95:6 and Solomon accordingly practiseth, 1 Kings 8:54 2 Chronicles 6:13.

Who am I, and what is my house, that thou hast brought me hitherto? how indefinitely unworthy am I and my family of this great honour and happiness!

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Samuel 7:18". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-samuel-7.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

DAVID’S PRAYER, 2 Samuel 7:18-29.

18.Sat before the Lord — In the sanctuary on Zion before the ark of the covenant. ישׁב, sat, cannot be pressed to show the posture of David while he prayed, for the word may also be rendered waited, or tarried.

Brought me hitherto — From a humble shepherd boy to be ruler of all Israel. 2 Samuel 7:8.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 7:18". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-samuel-7.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

2 Samuel 7:18. Then went King David in — Into the tabernacle. And sat before the Lord — That is, before the ark, the symbol of the divine presence, and where God was then peculiarly present, and was believed by David to be so. David probably sat for a season, while he meditated on these things, and then altered his posture and betook himself to prayer. It must be observed, however, that the Hebrew word, ישׁב, jashab, here rendered sat, may with equal propriety be translated, remained before the Lord. The Hebrews never addressed prayers or praises to God but either standing up or prostrate on the earth, and even their kings are always described as standing when they prayed or gave thanks in the temple. See Ezekiel 46:1-2; compared with 2 Kings 11:14, and 2 Chronicles 23:13. Nor is there any other posture of worship mentioned in Scripture, but standing, or kneeling, or falling on the face. Who am I, O Lord God? — How infinitely unworthy am I and my family of this great honour and happiness! Thus David begins his address to God in a becoming spirit of humility and self-abasement, acknowledging his utter unworthiness of the blessings which God had already bestowed on him.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 7:18". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/2-samuel-7.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Lord. "More in soul, than by this posture of the body, remaining quiet in meditation and prayer." (Cajetan) --- Vatable says only kings were allowed to pary sitting, (Sa; Menochius) and they must be of the house of Juda. (Maimonides) --- they say the priests always stood in the temple. But Josephus mentions seats of lead for them. (Jewish Wars vii. 11.) The Hebrew expression may denote no more, than that David continued for a long time in fervent prayer; Josephus says, prostrate on the ground before the ark. It is not so much the posture of the body as the fervour of the soul, which God regards. See St. Augustine, ad Simp. ii. q. 4.) Pythagoras ordered his disciples to pray sitting; and Homer represents Thetis in that attitude. (Calmet) --- Far, in power and glory. (Haydock)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 7:18". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/2-samuel-7.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Then. It is grace that really humbles.

sat before the LORD. Very different from sitting before one"s self, as in 2 Samuel 7:1.

Who am I . . . ? Figure of speech Erotesis. App-6. Compare 2 Samuel 7:1. When David sat in his own house he sat before him-self. See Structure, p. 416, "Q" and "Q".

O Lord GOD = O Adonai Jehovah. Adonai because

(1) David is the servant and He the master;

(2) because this title has to do with lordship in the earth. App-4. Compare verses: 2 Samuel 7:7, 2 Samuel 7:19 (twice), 2 Samuel 7:20, 2 Samuel 7:28, 2 Samuel 7:29, six times in this chapter.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 7:18". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-samuel-7.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Then went king David in, and sat before the LORD, and he said, Who am I, O Lord GOD? and what is my house, that thou hast brought me hitherto?

Then went king David in, and sat before the Lord. Sitting was anciently an attitude for worship (Exodus 17:12; 1 Samuel 4:13; 1 Kings 19:4). As to the particular attitude, David sat most probably upon his heels. It was the posture of the ancient Egyptians before the shrines; it is the posture of deepest respect before a superior in the East. Persons of highest dignity sit thus when they do sit in the presence of kings; and it is the only sitting attitude assumed by the modern Mohammedans in their places and rites of devotion. In Pococke's Travels' is drawn the figure of a person half-sitting, half-kneeling, that is, kneeling so as to rest the muscular part of the body upon the heels. This, he informs us, is the attitude in which inferiors sit at this day before great men in the East; and it is regarded as a posture of proper humility. Who am I, O Lord God? and what is my house? This prayer breathes throughout a spirit of joyful surprise and overflowing gratitude. The exordium shows that David's thoughts had been taking a rapid retrospective survey of his marvelous career, from his humble origin until his elevation to the throne-a career distinguished in every stage by signal tokens of the divine favour, the crowning expression of which was the promised prosperity of his royal line (Psalms 21:3 : see Pye Smith's 'Scripture Testimony,' p. 117).

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 7:18". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/2-samuel-7.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(18) Then went king David in, and sat.—As always at every important point in his life, David’s first care is to take that which he has in his mind before the Lord. The place to which he went must be the tent he had pitched for the ark. Here he sat to meditate in God’s presence upon the communication which had now been made to him, and then to offer his thanksgiving (2 Samuel 7:18-21), praise (2 Samuel 7:22-24), and prayer (2 Samuel 7:25-29).

The Divine Name is here printed with the word GOD in small capitals. This is always done in the Authorised Version wherever it stands for JEHOVAH in the original. The same custom is also followed with the word LORD. Out of reverence for the name, Jehovah never has its own vowels in Hebrew, but is printed with those belonging to Lord, or in case this word also is used, then with those belonging to God.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 7:18". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-samuel-7.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Then went king David in, and sat before the LORD, and he said, Who am I, O Lord GOD? and what is my house, that thou hast brought me hitherto?
sat
1 Chronicles 17:16; Isaiah 37:14
Who am I
Genesis 32:10; Exodus 3:11; Judges 6:15; 1 Samuel 9:21; 15:17; 18:18; Psalms 8:4; Ephesians 3:8
Reciprocal: Genesis 24:21 - wondering at;  2 Samuel 12:20 - the house;  2 Samuel 23:5 - Although;  2 Kings 19:15 - prayed;  1 Chronicles 29:14 - who am I:2 Chronicles 2:6 - who am I then;  Psalm 60:6 - rejoice;  Isaiah 37:15 - GeneralJeremiah 32:16 - I Prayed;  Luke 1:48 - regarded;  Acts 7:46 - found;  1 Thessalonians 3:9 - what

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 7:18". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-samuel-7.html.

18. Toen ging de koning David in het op Sion opgerichte heiligdom en bleef 1) voor het aangezicht van de HEERE om zijn dank voor de ontvangen genadige belofte en zijn wens voor haar vervulling in een vurig gebed uit te drukken, en hij zei, allereerst zijn onwaardigheid bekennende met betrekking tot al het goede, dat hem vroeger geschonken en nu door deze bijzonder heerlijke belofte in buitengewone mate vermeerderd was: Wie ben ik, Heere, HEERE! en wat is mijn huis, dat Gij mij tot hiertoe gebracht hebt (Genesis 32:10 Psalm 8:5; 144:3)?

1) In het Hebreeuws joscheeb bleef, in de zin van, vertoefde, al staande, in tegenoverstelling tot zat. Hij staat hier voor het aangezicht van de Heere in het gevoel en in het bewustzijn van zijn geringheid en kleinheid tegenover de Grootheid en nooit genoeg volprezen Goedheid van God. De goedertierenheid van de Heere en de opsomming daarvan, de beloften hem geschonken hebben hem klein en ootmoedig gemaakt. Hij moet zijn hart uitstorten voor zijn God, en straks Hem smeken om genadige vervulling van de belofte..