Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 18:2

Now Judas also, who was betraying Him, knew the place, for Jesus had often met there with His disciples.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Gethsemane;   Jesus, the Christ;   Judas (Jude);   Prophecy;   Traitor;   The Topic Concordance - Judas Iscariot;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Gardens;   Kidron or Cedron;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Gethsemane;   Judas;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Gardens;   Torches;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Gethsemane;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Garden;   Gethsemane;   John, the Gospel of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Arrest ;   Garden ;   Gethsemane ;   Judas Iscariot (2);   Mount of Olives ;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Gethsemane ;   Judas Iscariot ;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Cedron;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Gethsemane;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Gethsem'a-Ne;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Jesus Christ, the Arrest and Trial of;   Judas Iscariot;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Judas - knew the place - As many had come from different quarters to celebrate the passover at Jerusalem, it could not be an easy matter to find lodging in the city: Jesus therefore chose to pass the night in the garden with his disciples which, from this verse, and from Luke 22:39, we find was his frequent custom, though he often lodged in Bethany. But, as he had supped in the city this evening, Judas took it for granted that he had not gone to Bethany, and therefore was to be met with in the garden; and, having given this information to the priests, they gave him some soldiers and others that he might be the better enabled to seize and bring him away.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 18:2". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-18.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Jesus ofttimes resorted thither - For what purpose he went there is not declared, but it is probable that it was for retirement and prayer. He had no home in the city, and he sought this place, away from the bustle and confusion of the capital, for private communion with God. Every Christian should have some place - be it a grove, a room, or a garden - where he may be alone and offer his devotions to God. We are not told much of the private habits of Jesus, but we are permitted to know so much of him as to be assured that he was accustomed to seek for a place of retirement, and during the great feasts of the Jews the Mount of Olives was the place which he chose, Luke 21:37; Matthew 21:17; John 8:1.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on John 18:2". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/john-18.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

Now Judas also, who betrayed him, knew the place: for Jesus oft-times resorted thither with his disciples.

There were doubtless several places to which Jesus might have gone that night if he had wished to hide; but this choice of a place Judas knew well showed his willingness to suffer.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 18:2". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-18.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And Judas also which betrayed him, knew the place,.... This character is given of Judas, to distinguish him from another disciple of the same name; and though as yet he had not betrayed him, yet it was determined he should, and Christ knew it, and he was now about to do it: and it is observed, that Judas was as well acquainted with the place of Christ's resort, and knew the garden he frequently retired to, as the rest of the disciples; to show that Christ did not go there to hide and secure himself from him, but to meet him, and that he might have an opportunity of finding him with the greater case:

for Jesus often times resorted thither with his disciples; when at Jerusalem at any of the feasts, and at this festival; partly for refreshment and rest after he had been preaching in the temple, and partly for prayer, and also for private conversation with his disciples.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on John 18:2". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-18.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

knew the place, for Jesus ofttimes — see John 8:1; Luke 21:37.

resorted thither with his disciples — The baseness of this abuse of knowledge in Judas, derived from admission to the closest privacies of his Master, is most touchingly conveyed here, though nothing beyond bare narrative is expressed. Jesus, however, knowing that in this spot Judas would expect to find Him, instead of avoiding it, hies Him thither, as a Lamb to the slaughter. “No man taketh My life from Me, but I lay it down of Myself” (John 10:18). Besides, the scene which was to fill up the little breathing-time, the awful interval, between the Supper and the Apprehension - like the “silence in heaven for about the space of half an hour” between the breaking of the Apocalyptic Seals and the peal of the Trumpets of war (Revelation 8:1) - the AGONY - would have been too terrible for the upper room; nor would He cloud the delightful associations of the last Passover and the first Supper by pouring out the anguish of His soul there. The garden, however, with its amplitude, its shady olives, its endeared associations, would be congenial to His heart. Here He had room enough to retire - first, from eight of them, and then from the more favored three; and here, when that mysterious scene was over, the stillness would only be broken by the tread of the traitor.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 18:2". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/john-18.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Resorted thither (συνηχτη εκειsunēchthē ekei). First aorist passive indicative of συναγωsunagō old verb to gather together. A bit awkward here till you add “with his disciples.” Judas knew the place, and the habit of Jesus to come here at night for prayer (Luke 22:39). Hence his offer to catch Jesus while the feast was going on, catch him at night and alone in his usual place of prayer (the very spirit of the devil).

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright © Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 18:2". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-18.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Which betrayed ( ὁ παραδιδοὺς )

The present participle, marking the betrayal as in progress. Literally, who is betraying.

Resorted ( συνήχθη )

Literally, assembled. The items of this verse are peculiar to John.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on John 18:2". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/john-18.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And Judas also, which betrayed him, knew the place: for Jesus ofttimes resorted thither with his disciples.

Mark 14:43; Luke 22:47.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on John 18:2". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/john-18.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

Now Judas also, who betrayed him, knew the place1: for Jesus oft-times resorted thither with his disciples.
    JESUS BETRAYED, ARRESTED, AND FORSAKEN. (Gethsemane. Friday, several hours before dawn.) Matthew 26:47-56; Mark 14:43-52; Luke 22:47-53; John 18:2-11

  1. Now Judas also, who betrayed him, knew the place. See Luke 21:37; Luke 22:39.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
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J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 18:2". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-18.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 And Judas also, which betrayed him, knew the place: for Jesus ofttimes resorted thither with his disciples.

Ver. 2. And Judas also which betrayed him] No such danger to Christ’s Church by any as by apostates and false brethren, Galatians 2:4. Julian of a forward professor became a furious persecutor, and drew more from the faith by fraud and craft than all the heathen emperors before him had done by their force and cruelty. He persecuted by his persuasions, as Nazianzen witnesseth, and called back the bishops that were banished by Constantine, that, by their mutual wranglings among themselves they might embroil and overthrow the Church. Eo tantum fine ut ipsi ob mutuam inter se contentionem bello intestine oppugnarent ecclesiam. (Sozom.) About the year of grace 1240, one Robert, a Bulgarian, fell away from the Waldenses, and, turning to be a Dominican, he proved to be a sore enemy to the Church of Christ, in Flanders especially. Bishop Bonner was at first advanced by Cromwell, and seemed much to dislike Stephen Gardiner for his Popery. His words to Grafton at Paris when he was newly made bishop of London were these, Before God, the greatest fault that I ever found in Stokesly (who was his predecessor) was for vexing and troubling poor men for their religion, as Lobly the bookbinder, and others, for having the Scripture in English and (God willing) he did not so much hinder it, but I will as much further it, &c. Baldwin the renegade and Bolsecus (that was hired by the Papists to write Calvin’s life) were desperate enemies to the truth they had formerly professed. Harding, that had conference with Jewell, was once a zealous Protestant, and chaplain to Lady Jane Grey. Champian of St John’s college in Oxford, proctor of the University, 1568, dissembled the Protestant religion, which he afterwards opposed to his utmost. So did Parsons, who was of Baliol college, till he was for his dishonesty expelled with disgrace, and fled to the Papists. Christ’s greatest enemies are usually those of his own house. He was of the society of Jesus that betrayed him.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 18:2". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-18.html. 1865-1868.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

2.] often,—see Luke 21:37 [ch. John 8:1]. These accurate notices of our Evangelist are especially found in this last portion of his Gospel: cf. John 18:13; John 18:24; John 18:28; ch. John 19:14; John 19:20; John 19:41, &c.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on John 18:2". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/john-18.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

John 18:2. τὸν τόπον) the place, and the plan of the whole place. [It is truly the worst of all sins, when one perverts to a bad use the knowledge of a good cause, which he had formerly possessed.—V. g.]— ἐκεῖ, there) in the scene of His approaching agony.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 18:2". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-18.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

We read that Christ, when he was at Jerusalem, was wont at night for privacy to retire to the mount of Olives, Luke 21:37 22:39 and it should seem that he was wont ordinarily to go to this garden, which made Judas know the particular place where he might find him.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 18:2". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-18.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

2.Jesus ofttimes resorted thither—Where, beneath shadowing olive trees, he held discourse with his followers. Hence this is the place where Judas, whom we last saw departing from the supper-table, (xiii, 30,) was again to meet his Master. At this point, according to the other Evangelists, is to be inserted the narrative of the agony of Gethsemane. By a ruthless criticism, Strauss and others infer from the silence of John and the triumphant tone of the valedictory and prayer of the previous chapters, that the agony never took place. We apprehend that the answers are ample. Why should John insert what had been so fully given by his predecessors? And who cannot see that the sorrows of Gethsemane are truly preluded by the sad undertone, mentioned in our closing note to the last chapter, both of the valedictory and the prayer? Nor are we able to conceive how a scene so wonderful in its conception, so unparalleled and mysterious in its character, so surpassing any passage of classic antiquity, could have been framed without the basis of truth, either by the genius of the Evangelists or the mind of the early Christian Church. No truly Christian heart needs any defence of this passage from a criticism so utterly uncritical.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 18:2". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-18.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘Now Judas also, who betrayed him, knew the place, for Jesus often went there with his disciples.’

This important piece of information explains why Judas was able to find him so easily and why he was needed in order to obtain the arrest. They had tried to arrest Jesus in official places when people were present and had been unable to do so. Judas provided them with the opportunity of finding Him comparatively alone in a private and secluded place.

The fact that this was a regular rendezvous ties in with Luke 21:37 where we are told that Jesus taught in the Temple by day, and by night would go to the Mount of Olives. It is quite possible that some provision of accommodation was made for Him there. Alternately they may have slept in the open air or in tents.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on John 18:2". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/john-18.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

John apparently recorded this detail because it shows that Jesus was not trying to avoid arrest. Instead He deliberately went to a place where Judas evidently anticipated that He would go (cf. Luke 21:37; Luke 22:39).

"This probably means that he and the disciples used to bivouac, sleeping in the open air, and probably in this very garden." [Note: Morris, p656. See Wiersbe, 1:372, for contrasts between what happened in the Garden of Eden and the Garden of Gethsemane.]

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on John 18:2". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/john-18.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

John 18:2. And Judas also, which betrayed him, knew the place: for Jesus ofttimes assembled thither with his disciples. The ‘ofttimes’ must refer to many previous visits to the garden, and not to those connected with the present brief sojourn in Jerusalem. The omission at this point of all mention of the ‘Agony’ in the garden has often occasioned great surprise, and been even used as an argument against the fidelity of the narrative of the Fourth Gospel. Yet it may be observed—(1) That, while the supplementary theory (see Introduction) cannot, as a whole, be received in explanation of the structure of our Gospel, it is quite natural to think that the Evangelist may have felt himself justified in the omission of particular scenes, because he was aware that they were already well known, through his predecessors, to the Church. (2) That his relation of the similar mental conflict and prayer in chap. 12—a relation in which he stands alone—made it both more possible and more natural for him to omit this section here. (3) That his object being now to bring prominently forward the calm majesty with which Jesus met His final sufferings, he was led to select those parts of His actions and words which peculiarly illustrate this, and to say nothing of other parts by which the picture might seem to be disturbed. Such a proceeding is consistent with the most perfect faithfulness. It was not the aim of any one of the Evangelists to present us with a complete narrative of all the life of Jesus, or of all the aspects of His character and work. Each drew rather out of His infinite fulness what was peculiarly appropriate to the design which he had himself in view, or to the range in which he felt himself called upon to work. What we have to ask is not that each shall tell us all, but that the several narratives shall not be inconsistent with each other. No such inconsistency can be urged here. The Agony is the illustration of the words,’ O my Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from me: ‘the narrative before us is the illustration of the words,’ Nevertheless, not as I will, but as thou wilt; and we know that both these sentences were uttered at the same moment by the lips of Jesus (Matthew 26:39).

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 18:2". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-18.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

John 18:2. . “And Judas also knew the place, because Jesus and His disciples had frequently assembled there” on previous visits to Jerusalem, Luke 21:37. This is inserted to account for what follows, and to remind the reader of the voluntariness of the surrender. There was no attempt to escape or hide.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on John 18:2". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/john-18.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

knew. Greek. oida. App-132.

with. Greek meta. App-104.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 18:2". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-18.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And Judas also, which betrayed him, knew the place: for Jesus ofttimes resorted thither with his disciples.

And Judas also, which betrayed him, knew the place; for Jesus ofttimes resorted there with his disciples. The baseness of this abuse of knowledge in Judas, derived from the privilege he enjoyed of admission to the closest privacies of His Master, is most touchingly conveyed here, though only in the form of simple narrative. Jesus, however, knowing that in this spot Judas would expect to find Him, instead of avoiding it, hies Him there, as a Lamb to the slaughter. "No man taketh my life from me, but I lay it down of myself" (John 10:18). For other reasons why this spot was selected, see on the Agony in the garden (Luke 22:39-46), page 331, second column, third paragraph.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 18:2". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-18.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(2) And Judas also, which betrayed.—Better, . . . who was betraying Him. The original word is a present participle, and marks the Betrayal as actually in progress.

For Jesus ofttimes resorted thither with his disciples.—This is one of the instances of St. John’s exact knowledge of the incidents which attended the Jerusalem life of our Lord. (Comp. Introduction, p. 371.) All the Evangelists narrate the coming of Judas. John only remembers that the spot was one belonging, it may be, to a friend or disciple, where Jesus was in the habit of going with His disciples, and that Judas therefore knew the place, and knew that he would probably find them there.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 18:2". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-18.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And Judas also, which betrayed him, knew the place: for Jesus ofttimes resorted thither with his disciples.
for
Mark 11:11,12; Luke 21:37; 22:39
Reciprocal: 1 Samuel 23:23 - take knowledge;  Psalm 55:12 - then I;  Matthew 10:4 - and;  Matthew 26:2 - betrayed;  Matthew 26:14 - Judas;  Mark 14:42 - GeneralLuke 22:47 - while;  John 6:71 - being;  John 12:4 - Judas Iscariot;  Acts 1:16 - spake

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 18:2". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-18.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Ver. 2. "And Judas also, which betrayed Him, knew the place; for Jesus ofttimes resorted thither with His disciples."

The owner of this place must have stood in a special relation to Jesus: this is evident, not only from His free resort to the garden, but also from the narrative of the young man in Mark 14:51-52. The young man must have belonged to the family of the owner of the garden. This is plain from his clothing—in a cold night he had on only a linen garment—which did not permit him to be taken away from the place. Sympathy for Jesus, at the time of His imminent danger, must have led him suddenly from his bed into the open air. Curiosity could not have been the motive: in that case the Evangelist would not have mentioned the matter, which was worth recording only as showing that the Apostles had ground for flying. πολλάκις, oft, cannot refer only to the few days immediately preceding the Passover. Jesus kept Himself, during the whole time between the Feast of Tabernacles and the last Passover, in Jerusalem and its neighbourhood. Yet it seems that in the last days before the Passover, Gethsemane was the special abiding-place; that He spent there the nights of Monday and Tuesday, Tuesday and Wednesday, Wednesday and Thursday; that He withdrew thither during the last two days before the festival for still seclusion; and thence sent the disciples into Jerusalem for the preparation of the Passover. If this were so, we have the reason why Judas was so sure of finding Him there. On the day of the entrance into Jerusalem, on Sunday, Jesus, according to Mark 11:11, returned with the Twelve to Bethany. In reference to the next day, we read, in Mark 11:19, "And when evening was come. He went out of the city." It is certainly not accidental that St Mark does not here, as in ver. 11, say, "to Bethany," but "outside the city." St Luke gives, in ch. Luke 21:37, a general notion of the locality where Jesus spent the remaining nights after Sunday: "And at night He went out, and abode in the mount that is called the Mount of Olives." Certainly Bethany, according to St Luke, belonged also to the Mount of Olives, ch. Luke 19:29. That we must not stop there, however, but regard him as having Gethsemane also partly in view, is shown by a comparison with ch. Luke 22:39-40. What determined our Lord to change His abode, is not clear. Probably greater nearness, probably also the household relations in Bethany.

Judas knew the place; that is, in regard to the matter now concerned, as the abode of Jesus. Jesus went designedly to the place which Judas knew. The time for hiding Himself from His enemies was past: His hour was come. He must afford the traitor an opportunity, that He might show that His surrender to death was voluntary.

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Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on John 18:2". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/john-18.html.