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Bible Commentaries

Everett's Study Notes on the Holy Scriptures

Luke 8

Verses 1-21

Indoctrination: Jesus Testifies of His Word In Luke 7:1 to Luke 8:21 Jesus testifies about His Word. He first demonstrates the power of His Word to heal the centurion’s servant (Luke 7:1-10), to raise the dead son of the widow of Nain (Luke 7:11-17), to work miracles (Luke 7:18-35), and to forgive sins (Luke 7:36-50). He then teaches a discourse on the Parable of the Sower in order to explain how the preaching of the Gospel affects the hearts of men (Luke 8:1-21).

Outline: Here is a proposed outline:

1. Narrative: Jesus Demonstrates His Doctrine (Capernaum) Luke 7:1-50

Verses 1-56

Witnesses of Jesus Justifying Him as the Saviour of the World (God the Father’s Justification of Jesus) Luke 4:31 to Luke 21:38 contains the testimony of Jesus’ public ministry, as He justifies Himself as the Saviour of the world. In this major section Jesus demonstrates His divine authority over man, over the Law, and over creation itself, until finally He reveals Himself to His three close disciples on the Mount of Transfiguration as God manifested in the flesh. Jesus is the Saviour over every area of man’s life and over creation itself, a role that can only be identified with God Himself. This was the revelation that Peter had when he said that Jesus was Christ, the Son of the Living God. Luke 4:14 to Luke 9:50 begins with His rejection in His hometown of Nazareth and this section culminates in Luke 9:50 with Peter’s confession and testimony of Jesus as the Anointed One sent from God. In summary, this section of material is a collection of narratives that testifies to Jesus’ authority over every aspect of humanity to be called the Christ, or the Saviour of the world.

Luke presents Jesus Christ as the Saviour of the world that was presently under the authority of Roman rule. He was writing to a Roman official who was able to exercise his authority over men. Thus, Luke was able to contrast Jesus’ divine authority and power to that of the Roman rule. Jesus rightfully held the title as the Saviour of the world because of the fact that He had authority over mankind as well as the rest of God’s creation. Someone who saves and delivers a person does it because he has the authority and power over that which oppresses the person.

In a similar way, Matthew portrays Jesus Christ as the Messiah who fulfilled Old Testament prophecy. Matthew’s presentation of Jesus as the King of the Jews supports His claim as the Messiah. John gives us the testimony of God the Father, who says that Jesus Christ is the Son of God. John uses the additional testimonies of John the Baptist, of His miracles, of the fulfillment of Old Testament prophecies and of Jesus Himself to support this claim. Mark testifies of the many miracles of the Lord Jesus Christ by emphasizing the preaching of the Gospel as the way in which these miracles take place.

This major section of the public ministry of Jesus Christ can be subdivided into His prophetic testimonies. In Luke 4:31 to Luke 6:49 Jesus testifies of true justification in the Kingdom of God. In Luke 7:1 to Luke 8:21 Jesus testifies of His doctrine. In Luke 8:22 to Luke 10:37 Jesus testifies of divine service in the Kingdom of God as He sets His face towards Jerusalem. In Luke 10:38 to Luke 17:10 Jesus testifies of perseverance in the Kingdom of God as He travels towards Jerusalem. Finally, in Luke 17:11 to Luke 21:38 Jesus teaches on glorification in the Kingdom of God.

The Two-Fold Structure in Luke of Doing/Teaching As Reflected in the Prologue to the Book of Acts - The prologue to the book of Acts serves as a brief summary and outline of the Gospel of Luke. In Acts 1:1 the writer makes a clear reference to the Gospel of Luke, as a companion book to the book of Acts, by telling us that this “former treatise” was about “all that Jesus began to do and to teach.” If we examine the Gospel of Luke we can find two major divisions in the narrative material of Jesus’ earthly ministry leading up to His Passion. In Luke 4:14 to Luke 9:50 we have the testimony of His Galilean Ministry in which Jesus did many wonderful miracles to reveal His divine authority as the Christ, the Son of God. This passage emphasized the works that Jesus did to testify of Himself as the Saviour of the world. The emphasis then shifts beginning in Luke 9:51 to Luke 21:38 as it focuses upon Jesus teaching and preparing His disciples to do the work of the Kingdom of God. Thus, Luke 4:14 to Luke 21:38 can be divided into this two-fold emphasis of Jesus’ works and His teachings. [186]

[186] We can also see this two-fold aspect of doing and teaching in the Gospel of Matthew, as Jesus always demonstrated the work of the ministry before teaching it in one of His five major discourses. The narrative material preceding his discourses serves as a demonstration of what He then taught. For example, in Matthew 8:1 to 9:38, Jesus performed nine miracles before teaching His disciples in Matthew 10:1-42 and sending them out to perform these same types of miracles. In Matthew 11:1 to 12:50 this Gospel records examples of how people reacted to the preaching of the Gospel before Jesus teaches on this same subject in the parables of Matthew 13:1-52. We see examples of how Jesus handled offences in Matthew 13:53 to 17:27 before He teaches on this subject in Matthew 18:1-35. Jesus also prepares for His departure in Matthew 19:1 to 25:46 before teaching on His second coming in Matthew 24-25.

Jesus’ Public Ministry One observation that can be made about Jesus’ Galilean ministry and his lengthy travel narrative to Jerusalem is that He attempts to visit every city and village in Israel that will receive Him. He even sends out His disciples in order to reach them all. But why is such an effort made to preach the Gospel to all of Israel during Jesus’ earthly ministry? Part of the answer lies in the fact that Jesus wanted everyone to have the opportunity to hear and believe. For those who rejected Him, they now will stand before God on the great Judgment Day without an excuse for their sinful lifestyles. Jesus wanted everyone to have the opportunity to believe and be saved. This seemed to be His passion throughout His Public Ministry. Another aspect of the answer is the impending outpouring of the Holy Ghost and the sending out of the Twelve to the uttermost parts of the earth. Jesus understood the necessity to first preach the Gospel to all of Israel before sending out the apostles to other cities and nations.

Verses 22-56

Divine Service: Jesus Testifies of Divine Service In Luke 8:22 to Luke 10:37 Jesus testifies of divine service in the Kingdom of God. In Luke 8:22-56 He demonstrates His authority in divine service by calming a storm (the natural realm), casting out demons (the spiritual realm), and healing two individuals who exercised faith in His word (the physical realm). He then delegates this authority to His disciples and allows them to go out and preach the Gospel, heal the sick, and feed the five thousand (Luke 9:1-17). This experience will culminate on the Mount of Transfiguration with Peter’s confession that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God (Luke 9:18-50). Jesus will deliver a discourse to the Seventy to prepare them for divine service (Luke 10:1-24). It is the story of the Good Samaritan that best illustrates the spirit of divine service, which is loving our neighbour (Luke 10:25-37).

Outline: Here is a proposed outline:

1. Narrative: Jesus Demonstrates Divine Service (Galilee) Luke 8:22 to Luke 9:50

2. Discourse: Jesus Trains 70 Disciples (Faces Jerusalem) Luke 9:51 to Luke 10:37

Verses 22-56

Divine Service: Jesus Testifies of Divine Service In Luke 8:22 to Luke 10:37 Jesus testifies of divine service in the Kingdom of God. In Luke 8:22-56 He demonstrates His authority in divine service by calming a storm (the natural realm), casting out demons (the spiritual realm), and healing two individuals who exercised faith in His word (the physical realm). He then delegates this authority to His disciples and allows them to go out and preach the Gospel, heal the sick, and feed the five thousand (Luke 9:1-17). This experience will culminate on the Mount of Transfiguration with Peter’s confession that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God (Luke 9:18-50). Jesus will deliver a discourse to the Seventy to prepare them for divine service (Luke 10:1-24). It is the story of the Good Samaritan that best illustrates the spirit of divine service, which is loving our neighbour (Luke 10:25-37).

Outline: Here is a proposed outline:

1. Narrative: Jesus Demonstrates Divine Service (Galilee) Luke 8:22 to Luke 9:50

2. Discourse: Jesus Trains 70 Disciples (Faces Jerusalem) Luke 9:51 to Luke 10:37

Copyright Statement
These files are copyrighted by the author, Gary Everett. Used by Permission.
No distribution beyond personal use without permission.
Bibliographical Information
Everett, Gary H. "Commentary on Luke 8". Everett's Study Notes on the Holy Scriptures. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/eng/ghe/luke-8.html. 2013.