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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 8:3

and Joanna the wife of Chuza, Herod's steward, and Susanna, and many others who were contributing to their support out of their private means.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Herod's steward - Though the original word, επιτροπος, signifies sometimes the inspector or overseer of a province, and sometimes a tutor of children, yet here it seems to signify the overseer of Herod's domestic affairs: the steward of his household. Steward of the household was an office in the king's palace by s. 24, of Hen. VIII. The person is now entitled lord steward of the king's household, and the office is, I believe, more honorable and of more importance than when it was first created. Junius derives the word from the Islandic stivardur, which is compounded of stia, work, and vardur, a keeper, or overseer: hence our words, warder, warden, ward, guard, guardian, etc. The Greek word in Hebrew letters is frequent in the rabbinical writings, אפיטדופום , and signifies among them the deputy ruler of a province. See on Luke 16:1; (note). In the Islandic version, it is forsionarmanns .

Unto him - Instead of αυτῳ, to him, meaning Christ, many of the best MSS. and versions have αυτοις, to them, meaning both our Lord and the twelve apostles, see Luke 8:1. This is unquestionably the true meaning.

Christ receives these assistances and ministrations, says pious Quesnel, -

  1. To honor poverty by subjecting himself to it.
  • To humble himself in receiving from his creatures.
  • That he may teach the ministers of the Gospel to depend on the providence of their heavenly Father.
  • To make way for the gratitude of those he had healed. And,
  • 5. That he might not be burthensome to the poor to whom he went to preach.


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    Bibliography
    Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 8:3". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-8.html. 1832.

    Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

    Herod‘s steward - Herod Antipas, who reigned in Galilee. He was a son of Herod the Great. The word “steward” means one who has charge of the domestic affairs of a family, to provide for it. This office was generally held by a “slave” who was esteemed the most faithful, and was often conferred as a reward of fidelity.

    Ministered - Gave for his support.

    Of their substance - Their property; their possessions. Christians then believed, when they professed to follow Christ, that it was proper to give “all” up to him - their property as well as their hearts; and the same thing is still required that is, to commit all that we have to his disposal; to be willing to part with it for the promotion of his glory, and to leave it when he calls us away from it.


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    Bibliography
    Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 8:3". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-8.html. 1870.

    John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

    And Joanna, the wife of Chuza, Herod's steward,.... Joanna, or Juchan, as the Syriac version calls her, was a name, among the Jews, for a woman, as Jochanan, or John, was for a man. In the TalmudF5T. Bab. Sota, fol. 22. 1. we read of one Jochani, or Joanni, the daughter of Retibi, the same name with this. Her husband's name was Chuza. Dr. Lightfoot observes, from a Talmudic treatiseF6Massechet Sopherim, c. 13. sect. 6. , such a name in the genealogy of Haman, who is called the son of Chuza; and Haman being an Edomite, and this man being in the family of Herod, who was of that race, suggests it to be an Idumean name. But in my edition of that treatise, Haman is not called the son of Chuza, but בר כיזא, "the son of Ciza"; and besides, Chuza is a Jewish name, and the name of a family of note among the Jews: hence we readF7T. Bab. Tasnith, fol. 22. 1. of R. Broka the Chuzite; where the gloss is, "for he was", מבי חוזאי, "of the family of Chuzai". And elsewhereF8T. Bab. Nedarim, fol. 22. 1. mention is made of two sons of Chuzai; and both the gloss, and Piske Harosh upon the place, say, "they were Jews": so Abimi is said to be of the family of Chuzai, or the ChuzitesF9Juchasin, fol. 75. 1. ; and the same is said of R. AchaF11Juchasin, fol. 78. 1. . This man, here mentioned, was Herod's steward; a steward of Herod the "tetrarch", of Galilee. The Arabic version calls him his "treasurer"; and the Vulgate Latin, and the Ethiopic versions, his "procurator"; and some have thought him to be a deputy governor of the province under him; but he seems rather to be a governor, or "chief of his house", as the Syriac version renders it: he was one that presided in his family, and managed his domestic affairs; was an overseer of them, as Joseph was in Potiphar's house; and the same Greek word that is here used, is adopted by the Jews into their language, and used of JosephF12Targum Jon. & Jerus. in Gen. xxxix. 4. : and who moreover sayF13T. Bab. Beracot, fol 63. 1. & Maimon lssure Bia, c. 22. sect. 15. & Maggid Misn. in ib. ,

    "let not a man appoint a steward in his house; for if Potiphar had not appointed Joseph, אפוטרופוס, "a steward" in his house, he had not come into that matter,'

    of calumny and reproach. It was common for kings, princes, and great men, to have such an officer in their families. We readF14T. Bab. Sacca, fol. 27. 1. of a steward of king Agrippa's, who was of this same family. The Persic version is very foreign to the purpose, making Chuza to be "of the family of Herod". This man might be either dead, as some have conjectured; or, if living, might be secretly a friend of Christ, and so willing that his wife should follow him; or, if an enemy, such was her zeal for Christ, that she cheerfully exposed herself to all his resentments; and chose rather meanness, contempt, and persecution with Christ, and for his sake, than to enjoy all the pleasures of Herod's court without him.

    And Susannah; this also was a name for a woman with the, Jews, as appears from the history of one of this name with them, which stands among the apocryphal writings. She, as well as Joanna, and perhaps also Mary Magdalene, were rich, and persons of substance, as well as note, as should seem by what follows: "and many others"; that is, many other women; for the words, are of the feminine gender:

    which ministered unto him of their substance; four ancient copies of Beza's, and five of Stephens's, and the Syriac version read, "which ministered unto them"; that is, to Christ, and his disciples, as the Persic version expresses it. This shows the gratitude of these women, who having received favours from Christ, both for their souls and bodies, make returns to him out of their worldly substance, in a way of thankfulness; and also the low estate of Christ, and his disciples, who stood in need of such ministrations; and may be an instruction to the churches of Christ to take care of their ministers, and to communicate in all good things to them, of whose spiritual things they partake; and may be a direction to them to minister to them of what is their own substance, and not another's; and to minister a proper part, and not the whole, as these women ministered to Christ, and his apostles, of substance which was their own, and that not all of it, but out of it.


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    Bibliography
    Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 8:3". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-8.html. 1999.

    Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

    Joanna, wife of Chuza, Herod‘s steward — If the steward of such a godless, cruel, and licentious wretch as Herod Antipas (see on Mark 6:14, etc.) differed greatly from himself, his post would be no easy or enviable one. That he was a disciple of Christ is very improbable, though he might be favorably disposed towards Him. But what we know not of him, and may fear he lacked, we are sure his wife possessed. Healed either of “evil spirits” or of some one of the “infirmities” here referred to - the ordinary diseases of humanity - she joins in the Savior's train of grateful, clinging followers. Of “Susanna,” next mentioned, we know nothing but the name, and that here only. But her services on this memorable occasion have immortalized her name. “Wheresoever this gospel shall be preached throughout the whole world, this also that she hath done,” in ministering to the Lord of her substance on His Galilean tour, “shall be spoken of as a memorial of her” (Mark 14:9).

    many others — that is, many other healed women. What a train! and all ministering unto Him of their substance, and He allowing them to do it and subsisting upon it! “He who was the support of the spiritual life of His people disdained not to be supported by them in the body. He was not ashamed to penetrate so far into the depths of poverty as to live upon the alms of love. He only fed others miraculously; for Himself, He lived upon the love of His people. He gave all things to men, His brethren, and received all things from them, enjoying thereby the pure blessing of love: which is then only perfect when it is at the same time both giving and receiving. Who could invent such things as these? It was necessary to live in this manner that it might be so recorded” [Olshausen].


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    These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
    This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

    Bibliography
    Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 8:3". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-8.html. 1871-8.

    John Lightfoot's Commentary on the Gospels

    3. And Joanna the wife of Chuza Herod's steward, and Susanna, and many others, which ministered unto him of their substance.

    [The wife of Chusa.] We meet with such a name in Haman's genealogy: "The king promoted Haman the Hammedathite, the Agathite, the son of Cusa," &c. The Targumist, Esther 5, reckoning up the same genealogy, mentions not this name, and differs in others. Only this let us take notice of by the way, that Chusa is a name in the family of Haman the Edomite, and this Cusa here was in the family of Herod, who himself was of the blood of the Edomites.


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    Bibliography
    Lightfoot, John. "Commentary on Luke 8:3". "John Lightfoot Commentary on the Gospels". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jlc/luke-8.html. 1675.

    People's New Testament

    Joanna the wife of Chuza. Nothing more is known of her. As her husband held a very responsible position, she must have been a woman of wealth and influence.

    Herod. Herod Antipas. See notes on Matthew 2:1.

    Susanna. Not named elsewhere.

    Ministered unto him. Contributed to his support. They used their means to support Jesus and the apostles while preaching.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
    Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

    Bibliography
    Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on Luke 8:3". "People's New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/luke-8.html. 1891.

    Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

    Joanna (ΙωαναIōana). Her husband ΧυζαChuzā steward (επιτροπουepitropou) of Herod, is held by some to be the nobleman (βασιλικοςbasilikos) of John 4:46-53 who believed and all his house. At any rate Christ had a follower from the household of Herod Antipas who had such curiosity to see and hear him. One may recall also Manaen (Acts 13:1), Herod‘s foster brother. Joanna is mentioned again with Mary Magdalene in Luke 24:10.

    Who ministered unto them (αιτινες διηκονουν αυτοιςhaitines diēkonoun autois). Imperfect active of διακονεωdiakoneō common verb, but note augment as if from διαdia and ακονεωakoneō but from διακονοςdiakonos and that from διαdia and κονιςkonis (dust). The very fact that Jesus now had twelve men going with him called for help from others and the women of means responded to the demand.

    Of their substance (εκ των υπαρχοντων αυταιςek tōn huparchontōn autais). From the things belonging to them. This is the first woman‘s missionary society for the support of missionaries of the Gospel. They had difficulties in their way, but they overcame these, so great was their gratitude and zeal.


    Copyright Statement
    The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

    Bibliography
    Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 8:3". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-8.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

    Vincent's Word Studies

    Steward ( ἐπιτρόπου )

    From ἐπιτρέπω , to turn toward; thence to turn over to, transfer, and so commit or intrust to. The word thus literally means, one to whom the management of affairs is turned over.

    sa40


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    Bibliography
    Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 8:3". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-8.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

    The Fourfold Gospel

    and Joanna the wife of Chuzas Herod's steward1, and Susanna2, and many others, who ministered unto them of their substance3.

    1. Joanna the wife of Chuzas Herod's steward. Joanna is mentioned again at Luke 24:10. Of Chuzas we know nothing more than what is stated here. There are two Greek words for steward, "epitropos" and "oikonomos". The first may be translated "administrator, superintendent, or governor". It conveys the impression of an officer or higher rank. The Jewish rabbis called Obadiah the "epitropos" of Ahab. This was the office held by Chuzas, and its translated "treasurer" in the Arabic version. The second word may be translated "housekeeper, or domestic manager". It was an office usually held by some trusted slave as a reward for his fidelity. Chuzas was no doubt a man of means and influence. As there was no order of nobility in Galilee, and as such an officer might be nevertheless styled a nobleman, this Chuzas was very likely the nobleman of John 4:46. If so, the second miracle at Cana explains the devotion of Joanna to Jesus. Herod's capital was at Sepphoris, on an elevated tableland not far from Capernaum.

    2. Susanna. Of Susanna there is no other record, this being enough to memorialize her.

    3. And many others, who ministered unto them of their substance. The ministration of these women shows the poverty of Christ and his apostles, and explains how they were able to give themselves so unremittingly to the work. Some of the apostles also may have had means enough to contribute somewhat to the support of the company, but in any event the support was meager enough, for Jesus was among the poorest of earth (Luke 9:58; Matthew 17:24; 2 Corinthians 8:9). His reaping of carnal things was as scanty as his sowing of spiritual things was abundant (1 Corinthians 9:11). We should note how Jesus began to remove the fetters of custom which bound women, and to bring about a condition of universal freedom (Galatians 3:28).


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

    Bibliography
    J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 8:3". "The Fourfold Gospel". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-8.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

    Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

    Herod's. This was Herod Antipas, the son of old King Herod, and the tetrarch of this part of his father's dominions.--Of their substance; of their property. This and other allusions show that Jesus did not throw himself upon the local and casual charity of the people among whom he travelled, but made, himself, a proper provision for the wants of his company, from the contributions of known and tried friends. From Luke 9:13, it seems that they were accustomed to travel with supplies of provisions and money. Perhaps Philip at one time, (John 6:5,) and certainly Judas afterwards, acted as treasurer and steward. In the same way, we ought, in all our religious enterprises, to make provision ourselves, in the most systematic and business-like manner, for all the wants which the most active sagacity can foresee; and never make faith a substitute for forethought, or expect aid, from divine interpositions, in emergencies which might have been provided for by prudential arrangements of our own.


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    Bibliography
    Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Luke 8:3". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/luke-8.html. 1878.

    Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

    Luke 8:3.Joanna, the wife of Chuza It is uncertain whether or not Luke intended his statement to be applied to those women in the same manner as to Mary To me it appears probable that she is placed first in order, as a person in whom Christ had given a signal display of his power; and that the wife of Chuza, and Susanna, matrons of respectability and of spotless reputation, are mentioned afterwards, because they had only been cured of ordinary diseases. Those matrons being wealthy and of high rank, it reflects higher commendation on their pious zeal, that they supply Christ’s expenses out of their own property, and, not satisfied with so doing, leave the care of their household affairs, and choose to follow him, attended by reproach and many other inconveniences, through various and uncertain habitations, instead of living quietly and at ease in their own houses. It is even possible, that Chuza, Herod’s steward, being too like his master, was strongly opposed to what his wife did in this matter, but that the pious woman overcame this opposition by the ardor and constancy of her zeal.


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    Bibliography
    Calvin, John. "Commentary on Luke 8:3". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/luke-8.html. 1840-57.

    Scofield's Reference Notes

    Herod

    See margin ref., (See Scofield "Matthew 14:1").


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    Bibliography
    Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Luke 8:3". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/luke-8.html. 1917.

    John Trapp Complete Commentary

    3 And Joanna the wife of Chuza Herod’s steward, and Susanna, and many others, which ministered unto him of their substance.

    Ver. 3. Joanna, the wife of Chuza, Herod’s steward] Or treasurer, as the Arabic calleth him, his vicar-general, or protetrarch. This court lady followeth Christ: so did Serena the empress, who was therefore martyred by her husband Diocletian. So Elizabeth, Queen of Denmark; of whom Luther testifieth (in Epist. ad Jo. Agrieol.) that she died a faithful professor of the reformed religion; and addeth, Scilicet Christus etiam aliquando voluit Reginam in coelum vehere. Christ would once save a queen: which he doth not often.


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    Bibliography
    Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 8:3". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-8.html. 1865-1868.

    Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

    3.] Prof. Blunt has observed in his Coincidences, that we find a reason here why Herod should say to his servants (Matthew 14:2), ‘This is John the Baptist,’ &c., viz.—because his steward’s wife was a disciple of Jesus, and so there would be frequent mention of Him among the servants in Herod’s court.

    This is Herod Antipas.

    Johanna is mentioned again ch. Luke 24:10, and again in company with Mary Magdalene and others. Susanna is not again mentioned.

    διηκ., providing food, and giving other necessary attentions.


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    Bibliography
    Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 8:3". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-8.html. 1863-1878.

    Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

    Luke 8:3. ἰωάννα, Joanna) the wife of a husband of high standing in the world. [Her public attendance on the Saviour does not seem to have been without effect, in bringing it about that Herod came to know something concerning Jesus, ch. Luke 9:7.—V. g.]: yet in the household of Jesus Mary Magdalene takes precedency of her.— ἐπιτρόπου, steward).— διηκόνουν, ministered) The record of their ministry to the Lord is an ample reward of their liberality. But at that time, no doubt, many supposed them to be silly women.


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    Bibliography
    Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 8:3". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-8.html. 1897.

    Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

    See Poole on "Luke 8:3"


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    Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 8:3". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-8.html. 1685.

    Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

    3. Ἰωάννα. She is mentioned only in Luke 24:10, but had apparently been healed of some infirmity.

    γυνὴ Χουζᾶ ἐπιτρόπου Ἡρώδου. She was probably a widow of Chuzas. See Luke 24:10. On ἐπιτρόπου without the article see note on Luke 2:36. The courtiers of Antipas were well aware of the ministry and claims of Jesus. Not only had John the Baptist been a familiar figure among them, but Manaen, Herod’s foster-brother, early became a Christian (Acts 13:1), and whether Chuzas be the courtier (βασιλικος, E. V. “nobleman”) of John 4:46 or not, that courtier could only have been in the retinue of Antipas, and must have made known the healing of his son by Jesus. The word ἐπίτροπος, ‘administrator,’ conveys the impression of a higher rank than “steward” (οἰκονομος). The Rabbis adopted the word in Hebrew letters, and said that Obadiah was Ahab’s ἐπίτροπος. Manaen at Antioch was perhaps the source of St Luke’s special knowledge about the Herodian family.

    Σουσάννα. The name means ‘Lily.’

    ἕτεραι πολλαί. See Matthew 27:55.

    αἵτινες διηκόνουν αὐτοῖς ἐκ τῶν ὑπαρχόντων αὐταῖς. The verb διακονεῖν in the sense of pecuniary help is found also in Romans 15:25. This notice is deeply interesting as throwing light on the otherwise unsolved problem of the means of livelihood possessed by Jesus and His Apostles. They had a common purse which sufficed not only for their own needs but for those of the poor (John 13:29). The Apostles had absolutely forsaken their daily callings, but we may suppose that some of them (like Matthew and the sons of the wealthier fisherman Zebedee) had some small resources of their own, and here we see that these women, some of whom (as tradition says of Mary of Magdala) were rich, helped to maintain them. It must also be borne in mind [1] that the needs of an Oriental are very small. A few dates, a little parched corn, a draught of water, a few figs or grapes plucked from the roadside trees, suffice him; and in that climate he can sleep during most of the year in the open air wrapped up in the same outer garment which serves him for the day. Hence the standard of maintenance for a poor man in Palestine is wholly different from that required in such countries as ours with their many artificial needs. And yet [2] in spite of this our Lord was so poor as to be homeless (Luke 9:58), and without the means of even paying the small Temple-tribute of a didrachm (about 1 Samuel 6 d.), which was demanded from every adult Jew. Matthew 17:24; 2 Corinthians 8:9.


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    Bibliography
    "Commentary on Luke 8:3". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/luke-8.html. 1896.

    Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

    3. Joanna—The feminine of John, (see note on Luke 1:13,) and the same as Jane.

    Chuza… Herod’s steward—The manager of his property concerns and his household affairs. The royal residence of Herod Antipas, Sepphoris, which was the Roman capital of Galilee, stood near the centre of that province, on an elevated table-land but a small distance from Capernaum. From the mountain which separated it from the broad plain Nazareth was plainly visible. Hence Herod, the actual sovereign, and Jesus, the rightful sovereign by birth, were in close proximity. And hence the wife of Herod’s steward might easily hear of such miracles as the healing the centurion’s servant and the raising of the widow’s son at Nain. There were saints, perhaps, in Herod’s house, as there afterwards were in Caesar’s.

    See note on Matthew 14:2.

    Of their substance—These seem to be mentioned by Luke, including Mary Magdalene, as women of rank, wealth, and character. In a very incidental way he gives us to understand how the Son of man was as a man supported. He did not live by miracle. He commanded no stones to be made bread. The kingdom of God is to be built up, society is to be improved and renovated, not by miracle, but by the natural process of human agency.


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    Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 8:3". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-8.html. 1874-1909.

    Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

    Luke 8:3. Joanna. Her name appears again in chap. Luke 24:10.

    The wife, perhaps at that time a widow, of Chuzas Herod’s steward, i.e., the ‘house-steward’ of Herod Antipas. Through this family Herod and his servants (Matthew 14:2) might have heard of Jesus. Some have identified Chuzas with the ‘nobleman’ whose son was healed by our Lord (John 4:46-54); but the reason for Joanna’s gratitude was that she had herself been healed (Luke 8:2).

    Susanna (‘lily’). Not mentioned again.

    And many others. Comp. Matthew 27:55.

    Who ministered. All of them were such as thus ‘ministered,’ i.e., provided food and other necessary attentions.

    Unto them (the better supported reading), i.e., to the whole company. The alteration to the singular was probably designed to exalt the service of the women; but what was done to the disciples was done to Christ, according to His own words (Matthew 25:40).

    From their substance. This implies that some, perhaps most of them, were persons of means.

    Our Lord confided in the purity and faithfulness of His Galilean friends; He exalted women into the circle of His followers; woman’s work was at once a service of grateful love (a diaconate); these women of high position felt that constant temporal service was a fitting, though insufficient, return for spiritual benefits.—Such a circle as this is possible only where Christ is; about Him as the centre, gather preaching men and ministering women in purity and harmony.


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    Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 8:3". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-8.html. 1879-90.

    George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

    The wife of Chusa, Herod's steward. Literally, his procurator, as in the Rheims translation. The Greek signifies one that provides for another, or manages his concerns. The same word is used, Matthew xx. 8. and Galatians iv. 2. (Witham) --- the Greek word is epitropou. It was the custom of the Jews, says St. Jerome, that pious women should minister of their substance, meat, drink, and clothing, to their teachers going about with them. But as this might have given cause of scandal among the Gentiles, St. Paul mentions that he allowed it not. (1 Corinthians ix. 5. 12.) They thus ministered to our Lord and his apostles of their worldly substance, from whom they received spiritual riches.


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    Bibliography
    Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Luke 8:3". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/luke-8.html. 1859.

    E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

    the wife. She may have been the cause of Herod"s interest. Mark 6:14-16. Mark 23:8.

    others. Greek. Plural of heteros. App-124. See Matthew 27:55. which. Marking a class.

    of = from. apo as in Luke 8:2, but all the texts read ek.

    substance = property.


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    Bibliography
    Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 8:3". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-8.html. 1909-1922.

    Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

    And Joanna the wife of Chuza Herod's steward, and Susanna, and many others, which ministered unto him of their substance.

    And Joanna the wife of Chuza Herod's steward. If the steward of such a godless, cruel, and licentious sovereign as Herod Antipas (see the note at Mark 6:14, etc.) differed greatly from himself, his post would be no easy or enviable one. That he was a disciple of Christ is very improbable, though he might be favourably disposed toward Him. But what we know not of him, and may fear he wanted, we are sure his, wife possessed. Healed either of "evil spirits" or of some one of the "infirmities" here referred to-the ordinary diseases of humanity-she joins in the Saviour's train of grateful, clinging followers.

    And Susanna. Of her we know nothing but the name, and that in this one place only; but her services on this memorable occasion have immortalized her name - "Wheresoever this Gospel shall be preached throughout the whole world, this also that she hath done," in ministering to the Lord of her substance on this Galilean tour, "shall be spoken of as a memorial of her" (Mark 14:9).

    And many others , [ kai (Greek #2532) heterai (Greek #2087) pollai (Greek #4183)] - that is, 'many other healed women,'

    Which ministered unto him - rather, according to the better supported reading, 'unto them;' that is, to the Lord and the Twelve.

    Remarks:

    (1) What a train have we here! all ministering to the Lord of their substance, and He allowing them to do it, and subsisting upon it. Blessed Saviour! It melts us to see Thee living upon the love of Thy ransomed people. That they bring Thee their poor offerings we wonder not. Thou hast sown unto them spiritual things, and they think it, as well they might, a small thing that Thou shouldst reap their carnal things (1 Corinthians 9:11). But dost Thou take it at their hand, and subsist upon it? "O the depth of the riches" - of this poverty of His! Very noble are the words of Olshausen upon this scene: 'He who was the support of the spiritual life of His people disdained not to be supported by them in the body. He was not ashamed to penetrate so far into the depths of poverty as to live upon the alms of love. He only fed others miraculously: for Himself, He lived upon the love of His people. He gave all things to men His brethren, and received all things from them, enjoying thereby the pure blessing of love; which is then only perfect when it is at the same time both giving and receiving. Who could invent such things as these? It was necessary to live in this manner that it might be so recorded.' See more on this exalted subject, at Luke 19:28-44. Remark 2, at the close of that section. But

    (2) May not His loving people, and particularly those of the tender clinging sex, still accompany Him as He goes from land to land preaching, by His servants, and showing the glad tidings of the kingdom of God? and may they not minister to Him of their substance by sustaining and cheering these agents of His? Verily they may; and they do. "Inasmuch as ye have done it unto the least of these My brethren, ye have done it unto Me." Yes, as He is with them "alway, even unto the end of the world," in preaching and showing the glad tidings of the kingdom of God, even so, as many as are with the faithful workers of this work, and helpful to them in it, are accompanying Him and ministering to Him of their substance. But see the notes at Matthew 25:31-46, concluding Remarks.


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    Bibliography
    Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 8:3". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-8.html. 1871-8.

    The Bible Study New Testament

    Joanna. Nothing more is known of her. Note that her husband was an officer in Herod's court, which shows her social standing. [Herod Antipas. See note on Matthew 2:1.] Susanna. Mentioned only here. Who used their own resources. Note that they financed this tour of missions. What they were doing was unusual, but the customs of Palestine permitted them to do this [without scandal] to show their gratitude and devotion.


    Copyright Statement
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    Bibliography
    Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Luke 8:3". "The Bible Study New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/luke-8.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

    Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

    (3) Joanna, the wife of Chuza.—Here again we have a convert of the upper class. The name was the feminine form of Joannes, and appears in modern languages abbreviated into Joanne, Joan, or Jane. Nothing further is known of Chuza—but the “steward” (the same word as in Matthew 20:8, and the “tutor” or “guardian” of Galatians 4:2) of the Tetrarch, the manager of his income and expenditure, must have been a man of some mark. We may think of him and his wife as having probably come under the influence of the Baptist or of Manaen, the foster-brother of the Tetrarch, probably also of one of the “servants” to whom Antipas imparted his belief that John the Baptist was risen from the dead. Joanna appears again in the history of the Resurrection (Luke 24:10). It is possible, as suggested in the Note on John 4:46, that he may have been identical with the “nobleman” or “member of the royal household” at Capernaum. On this supposition her ministration may have been the result of overflowing gratitude for the restored life of her son.

    Susanna.—The name, which meant a “lily” (comp. Rhoda, “a rose,” in Acts 12:13, and Tamar, “a palm,” in Genesis 38:6, 2 Samuel 13:2, as parallel instances of feminine names derived from flowers or trees), meets us in the well-known Apocryphal addition to the Book of Daniel known as Susanna and the Elders. Nothing further is known of the person thus named.

    Many others.—It seems clear that St. Luke must have come into personal contact with some, at least, of those whom he describes so fully. They were, we may well believe, among the “eye-witnesses and ministers of the word” (Luke 1:2) from whom he derived much of his information. (See Introduction.)


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 8:3". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-8.html. 1905.

    Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

    And Joanna the wife of Chuza Herod's steward, and Susanna, and many others, which ministered unto him of their substance.
    Joanna
    24:10
    Herod's
    9:7-9; John 4:46-53; Acts 13:1; Philippians 4:22
    of their
    1 Chronicles 29:14; Isaiah 23:18; Matthew 2:11; 25:40; 26:11; Acts 9:36-39; 2 Corinthians 8:9; 1 Timothy 5:10

    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 8:3". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-8.html.

    Lectionary Calendar
    Sunday, July 12th, 2020
    the Week of Proper 10 / Ordinary 15
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